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Comment: Re:MOOC is designed like a physical classroom (Score 2) 182

by AuMatar (#47899531) Attached to: The MOOC Revolution That Wasn't

Feynman's statement is one of the most misapplied quotes of our lifetime. You can give the 10000 foot view of a subject in simple terms, usually. And that's what he meant. That's not the purpose of a college course- the purpose is to give you all the details, so you can apply them in new and novel ways. That requires lots of facts being thrown at you, lots of math, and lots of detail. Any attempt to do it otherwise IS being simplistic.

Comment: Re:Good intentions vs free time (Score 1) 182

by AuMatar (#47899479) Attached to: The MOOC Revolution That Wasn't

Its kind of hard to list all the prerequisites for everything. Especially since by the time you'd hit AI in any college course, you'd have taken probability and calculus years ago. Do I need to list understanding of the scientific method as a prerequisite for chem 300? The ability to read and write? There is a baseline knowledge you just have to assume- that's why you generally need to take the baseline courses like calc first in college.

What you can't do is take the math out- doing so waters down the course and makes it less usable for those who do have the knowledge, and gives you an incomplete understanding. Far better to have a few drop do to not understanding the math than to not provide the knowledge the course needs to in order to pass them.

Comment: Re: Good intentions vs free time (Score 1) 182

by AuMatar (#47899461) Attached to: The MOOC Revolution That Wasn't

Your metric needs improvement too. Cut off the employer part. No employer needs someone to take a MOOC in history, music theory, etc. Yet they exist and people love them. The real metric for success is how many people are able to learn about a field that under other circumstances they never could. Whether they ever use that knowledge, professionally or personally, isn't relevant.

Comment: Re:Slashvertisement (Score 1) 182

by AuMatar (#47899445) Attached to: The MOOC Revolution That Wasn't

Depends on how you define success. If you define success as being a replacement for college, you're right. They aren't, and likely never will be that. If by success you mean a place where motivated adults can learn about a subject without the costs and commitment of a degree program then they're a rousing success. And that's where the people who start MOOCs went wrong- they were thinking of them as college replacements. Think of them as adult learning at a university level for people who don't plan on making a career out of the knowledge, or for people who want to study a subfield they didn't in college. At that level they work very well. And if someone drops the course its no big deal- they just decided they didn't need it/want it after all.

Comment: Re:About Time The Market Got Hot (Score 1) 123

by AuMatar (#47895621) Attached to: Harvard's CompSci Intro Course Boasts Record-Breaking Enrollment

Here's the top hits in order for me:

Sherrif's office- http://www.teamdane.com/Securi...

Simply hired- clicking through shows that nothing on the first page of results actually calls the job that- the first results are signal support systems specialist, Sr client support specialist, field technician support specialist, Mac Support Specialist, and a SOX compliance officer.

Another link to Dane County

Another job site, a similar mix of results none of which actually use that title, although these tend to match the word security rather than support specialist

And finally a Cisco cert, for those who still give a shit about such things.

And a glass door salary link which shows two people nationwide using that title both at USAA.

Yeah, made up title.

Comment: Re:About Time The Market Got Hot (Score 1) 123

by AuMatar (#47895599) Attached to: Harvard's CompSci Intro Course Boasts Record-Breaking Enrollment

Ghosting takes minutes. Even doing analysis to figure out what's wrong would take far more than the entire process. And if you really have everything automated to the point it can be done in 15-30 minutes, then there's no human input at all- your job is a script that can run nightly on each machine, with 1 guy to update the files the script pulls.

Comment: Re:About Time The Market Got Hot (Score 1) 123

by AuMatar (#47895595) Attached to: Harvard's CompSci Intro Course Boasts Record-Breaking Enrollment

Sys admin? I'm a programmer. Don't have the temperment to be a sysadmin, I'd be miserable at it. I know exactly what dev ops is, I was in the room when a former boss said they were firing the sys admins and we were all now dev ops. It was a miserable experience all around. And that's exactly what devops is 90% of the time- its taking programmers and sticking them with the support job too. Maybe at some place once it worked differently and they really hired for a specific hybrid role- but don't kid yourself its the majority of the time. Usually its just the programmer who can most be spared from the real coding.

Computers can figure out all kinds of problems, except the things in the world that just don't add up.

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