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Submission + - Cameron tells pornography websites to block access by children or face closure (theguardian.com)

An anonymous reader writes: David Cameron is to give pornography websites one last chance to produce an effective voluntary scheme for age-restricted controls on their sites or he will introduce legislation that could see them shut down.

At the election the then culture secretary, Sajid Javid, said the party would act to ensure under-18s were locked out of adult content and the Conservative election Facebook page in April promised legislation to achieve this.

It followed a Childline poll that found nearly one in 10 12-13-year-olds were worried they were addicted to pornography and 18% had seen shocking or upsetting images.

In a consultation to be launched in the autumn, the government will seek views on how best to introduce measures to further restrict under-18s’ access to pornographic websites.

Submission + - CISA: the dirty deal between Google and the NSA that no one is talking about (thehill.com)

schwit1 writes: It's hard to find a more perfect example of this collusion than in a bill that's headed for a vote soon in the U.S. Senate: the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act, or CISA.

CISA is an out and out surveillance bill masquerading as a cybersecurity bill. It won't stop hackers. Instead, it essentially legalizes all forms of government and corporate spying.

Here's how it works. Companies would be given new authority to monitor their users — on their own systems as well as those of any other entity — and then, in order to get immunity from virtually all existing surveillance laws, they would be encouraged to share vaguely defined "cyber threat indicators" with the government. This could be anything from email content, to passwords, IP addresses, or personal information associated with an account. The language of the bill is written to encourage companies to share liberally and include as many personal details as possible.

That information could then be used to further exploit a loophole in surveillance laws that gives the government legal authority for their holy grail — "upstream" collection of domestic data directly from the cables and switches that make up the Internet.

Submission + - George R R Martin Reveals His Secret Weapon for Writing GOT- Wordstar

Hugh Pickens DOT Com writes: Ryan Reed writes that when most Game of Thrones fans imagine George R.R. Martin writing his epic fantasy novels, they probably picture the author working on a futuristic desktop (or possibly carving his words onto massive stones like the Ten Commandments). But the truth is that Martin works on an outdated DOS machine using Eighties word processor WordStar 4.0, as he revealed during an interview on Conan. "I actually like it," says Martin. "It does everything I want a word processing program to do, and it doesn't do anything else. I don't want any help. I hate some of these modern systems where you type a lower case letter and it becomes a capital letter. I don't want a capital. If I wanted a capital, I would have typed a capital. I know how to work the shift key." “I actually have two computers," Martin continued. “I have a computer I browse the Internet with and I get my email on, and I do my taxes on. And then I have my writing computer, which is a DOS machine, not connected to the Internet."

Submission + - Microsoft invites to dig E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial video game burial site (xbox.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Microsoft announced that the excavation of the long-rumored “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial” video game burial site will occur on April 26, 2014 and will be open to the public. Spectators are invited to watch the team uncover the infamous Atari game cartridge grave.
The Atari Corporation – faced with overwhelmingly negative response to the “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial” video game – allegedly disposed of millions of unsold game cartridges by burying them in the small town of Alamogordo, New Mexico in 1983.

Submission + - GOST 28147-89 block cipher gets 512 bit and 1 kbit keys (openwall.com)

grfrkr writes: From the OSS-security mailing list:

'The GOST 28147-89 block cipher celebrates its' 25-years jubilee this year. First published in 1989, it's one of the oldest (if not the most) of all symmetric block ciphers which are currently in use.
Original publishing describes possible key sizes of 32, 64, 128 and 256 bits. However, the internal representation of key data consists of 32 subkeys of 32 bits each'

This allows to use extremely robust keys of up to 1024-bits long.

'Also, the number of rounds for 512 bits and 1 kbit keys encryption will be increased up to 48 and 64 respectively.

This makes GOST 28147-89 the second (after Threefish) block cipher capable of using 512 bit and 1 kbit keys. Together with its' resistance against superpipelined bruteforcing (rumoured to be effectively used somewhere in South-Eastern Asia to break Rijndael), that means the "old horse" is still running.

The updated standard will get the new GOST registry number from the GOST-R 34.xxx series and is expected to be published till the end of 2014.'

Network

Submission + - Fujitsu's New Data Transfer Protocol 30 Times Faster than TCP (paritynews.com) 1

hypnosec writes: Japan based technology giant, Fujitsu, has announced a new data transfer protocol that is capable of transferring data up to 30 times faster than that of currently used Transmission Control Protocol (TCP). The new technology, which is a proprietary, has been developed through a software-only approach and is based on User Datagram Protocol (UDP) that is used in streaming media. Even though UDP is a stateless protocol, Fujitsu’s technology has been developed such that it can differentiate between dropped packers and those which haven’t managed to reach the intended destination. Fujitsu carried out tests between US and Japan and the results were amazing – a 30 times improvement over TCP communications in data transfer throughput and a reduction in packet delivery latency to a sixth of previous levels.
Politics

Submission + - Secession petitions flood White House website (politico.com) 1

RNLockwood writes: Political.com reports that several petitions to secede from the Union have been created at the White House site, We The People, for many states; all since Obama's re-election. Texas and Louisiana lead the list with Texas needing only 7,000 more signatures to qualify for a White House response, probably less now as more Americans have become aware of the petitions. (Probably there is no mapping to post election racist tweets Post Election Racist Tweets Map )

If the petitions spark the state legislatures to petition congress and the nation agrees to allow Louisiana and Texas to secede the we will save a LOT of money. For instance the Corps of Engineers will no longer be spend tax dollars to prevent flooding in Louisiana. Think of the savings if all the Federal buildings, bases, and facilities in Texas are closed! The residents of those states can take charge of their problems without federal interference at last. Since the citizens and businesses won't be paying Federa taxes, money saved will be used to create jobs, prosperity will follow, and show how just right Romney and Bush really were.

IMHO this is an experiment worth trying!! Slashdotters, get busy and sign as many of those petitions as you can.

Submission + - X-Ray Laser for creating supercharged particles (sciencedaily.com)

William Robinson writes: Scientists have found way to use X-Ray Laser for creating supercharged particles. The specific tuning of the laser's properties can cause atoms and molecules to resonate. The resonance excites the atoms and causes them to shake off electrons at a rate that otherwise would require higher energies. This could be used to create highly charged plasma.
Space

Submission + - Global warming felt by space junk, satellites (msn.com)

An anonymous reader writes: From msnbc.msn.com, "Rising carbon dioxide levels at the edge of space are apparently reducing the pull that Earth's atmosphere has on satellites and space junk, researchers say. The findings suggest that man made increases in carbon dioxide might be having effects on the Earth that are larger than expected, scientists added... in the highest reaches of the atmosphere, carbon dioxide can actually have a cooling effect. The main effects of carbon dioxide up there come from its collisions with oxygen atoms. These impacts excite carbon dioxide molecules, making them radiate heat. The density of carbon dioxide is too thin above altitudes of about 30 miles (50 kilometers) for the molecules to recapture this heat. Cooling the upper atmosphere causes it to contract, exerting less drag on satellites."

Notice: Your tin foil hats may need to be turned in for bunkers against falling space debris.

Submission + - Molten Salt Reactors would solve most of the problems (discovery.com)

Grayhand writes: Normally I'm opposed to more nuclear reactors because of the long term waste and risks involved. Molten Salt Reactors would get rid of most of the risks and would address the long term waste problems we have now. Build them next to existing reactors and the transport issues would also be solved.
Businesses

Submission + - Microsoft Unveils Incredible Real-Time Language Translation Technology (ibtimes.com)

redletterdave writes: "Thanks to a breakthrough accomplished just a little over two years ago — a joint achievement by Microsoft Research and the University of Toronto — a new technique known as "Deep Neural Networks," which is patterned after a human's own brain behavior, researchers have been able to make speech recognition, and thus, translation, significantly more discriminative and accurate. With improved listening skills, Microsoft was able to achieve better voice recognition software and then simultaneously feed that data into a language translation engine to break down the text, find the properly translated equivalent in the new language, and, the hardest part, reorder the words to make it appropriate for the intended listener. The result: Near-instant language translation, where the highly accurate final translation is delivered in what resembles the user's own unique voice.

The technology was demonstrated for the first time at Microsoft Research Asia's 21st Century Computing event; upon hearing Microsoft research chief Rick Rashid's voice translated perfectly in Mandarin Chinese — in his own voice, no less — the crowd erupted in several rounds of enormous applause."

Censorship

Submission + - China Blocks Google.com, Gmail, Maps and more during 18th party Congress (ibtimes.co.uk)

DavidGilbert99 writes: "In an extraordinary move, the Chinese authorities have blocked access to Google.com, Gmail, Google Maps, Google Docs, and many more Google services as the Communist Party of China holds the 18th Party Congress.

The blocking of these sites was reported by Chinese web monitoring site GreatFire.org, which said "Never before have so many people been affected by a decision to block a website."

The latest move in a long line of disputes between the Chinese government and Google, it is unclear yet whether this denial will be temporary (like a similar one in 2010) or permanent."

Microsoft

Submission + - Microsoft demos English-to-Chinese translator that keeps your voice and accent (extremetech.com)

MrSeb writes: "At an event in China, Microsoft Research chief Rick Rashid has demonstrated a real-time English-to-Mandarin speech-to-speech translation engine. Not only is the translation very accurate, but the software also preserves the user’s accent and intonation. We’re not just talking about a digitized, robotic translator here — this is firmly within the realms of Doctor Who or Star Trek universal translation. There is, of course, a lot of technological wizardry occurring behind the scenes. For a start, the software needs to be trained — both with a few hours of native, spoken Chinese, and an hour of Rick Rashid’s spoken English. From this, the software essentially breaks your speech down into the smallest components (phonemes), and then mushes them together with the Chinese equivalent, creating a big map of English to Mandarin sounds. Then, during the actual on-stage presentation, the software converts his speech into text, his text into Mandarin text, and then the Rashid/Chinese mash-up created during the training process is used to turn that text into spoken words. The end result definitely has a strong hint of digitized, robotic Microsoft Sam, but it’s surprising just how much of Rashid’s accent, timbre, and intonation is preserved."
Power

Submission + - Germany exports more power than ever despite phasing out nuclear enegery (google.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The german magazine "Der Spiegel" writes, that "the current export from Germany reached a record high this year — despite nuclear phase. Reason is the boom in green energy." Especially in the Netherlands power-plants are shut down because "electricity imported from Germany is cheaper." Is Germany an example of forward looking energy policy after all?

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