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Comment The MDM server is in Austria! (Score 1) 123

You have a good point:

$ host has address

$ whois ... snip...
netname: Schneid-GmbH
descr: Schneid GmbH
descr: Herbert Schneid
descr: PIRKA
descr: IPs statically assigned
country: AT

maxmind corroborates the information.

So... Sprint are putting control of your phone into the hands of someone in Austria. Nice going, guys!

Comment Reprogramming at the factory. (Score 1) 205

Okay, so, instead the blackhats break into the factory that is manufacturing the chips and modify the firmware that is being written to them. Now, every USB keyboard that the company manufactures looks to the computer as both a USB keyboard, and a USB network device.

I'm sure you remember those instances where malware was being pre-installed onto pre-formatted external drives, right?

Sure, there's a lot more to be done to turn that "Fake network device" into something that can trick the OS into treating it as a default gateway, as well as acting as a forwarding device so that modified packets can make it out the _real_ gateway, but... it only needs one weird combination of behaviours... somewhere... to be effective.

Comment It depends! (Score 1) 1086

I just helped a friend out with a ton of javascript animation for his webcomic (blatant plug: ), creating a 3d, semi-interactive environment, all in JS/CSS, and I ended up using a ton of math for it. Simple offset calculations, trig, parabolic arcs, exponential decay, and so on. Ended up giving up some things that would have required finding cubic roots of bezier curves because my math wasn't good enough.

But apart from that, I haven't used any serious math in a long time.

So, it depends... I think the more you rely on interacting or emulating "the real world", the more important math is.

Comment Colobot (Score 1) 704

Hunt down an oldish game called Colobot. Windows only game. Its a typical "world exploration" game but with one very interesting addition.

You can either control the myriad of robots manually, OR... program in a very C++-like language and let them "have at it".

The game encourages code re-use, so once you've coded a particular operation, you're encouraged to re-use it for subsequent levels.

One of the most fun coding experiences I've ever had.

No problem is so formidable that you can't just walk away from it. -- C. Schulz