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Comment: look at the back legs (Score 1) 62

by Chirs (#49802719) Attached to: MIT Trains Robots To Jump

The reason why this thing uses the front legs for the initial vertical push is that the back legs are shorter than on most running animals. Notice when it's running that the back legs and front legs never overlap, while on an actual cheetah their back legs stretch forwards past the front legs in order to allow the more powerful hind muscles to do more of the work.

Comment: if you're not a coder.... (Score 1) 147

by Chirs (#49701641) Attached to: Mechanical 'Clicky' Keyboards Still Have Followers (Video)

For regular typing the "truly ergonomic keyboard" is actually really nice. Symmetric stagger but the rows are not straight...they curve to match finger length.

For coding I found that the punctuation keys (the huge cluster by the right pinky) were moved around too much and it was hard to switch between it and a normal keyboard.

Comment: most systems vulnerable, not as bad as it looks (Score 2) 95

by Chirs (#49682187) Attached to: 'Venom' Security Vulnerability Threatens Most Datacenters

There's a recent post on the openstack-operators mailing list talking about this, but the basic gist is that pretty much all versions of qemu are susceptible to the bug, but that in practice it's not quite as big a deal as it sounds.

The thing to note is that the major linux distros by default enable something called "sVirt" which basically locks down qemu to using only the resources that have been explicitly assigned to it. This should make it hard (ideally impossible) to break out and compromise the host or other qemu processes.

Also, on most major linux distros qemu doesn't run as root but rather as a separate user with lower privileges.

Comment: I would qualify that... (Score 1) 532

by Chirs (#49630843) Attached to: The Medical Bill Mystery

Our medical care is second to none in quality and capability.

I'd be willing to posit that if you can afford to pay at the highest level then you can get the highest level of care. According to the New York Times though the USA doesn't provide the highest-qualtiy health care in all areas:

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08...

Comment: I usually wouldn't bother for a sore throat (Score 1) 532

by Chirs (#49630739) Attached to: The Medical Bill Mystery

Most of the time a sore throat isn't something you need to see a doctor about:
http://www.mayoclinic.org/dise...

In Canada we have a free healthcare phone number that you can call and talk to a Registered Nurse. They'll ask questions and clarify whether or not you should even both going in to see a doctor.

Comment: another Canadian begs to differ (Score 1) 532

by Chirs (#49630691) Attached to: The Medical Bill Mystery

Sure I can. I can call up my family doc and book an appointment (generally within 1 week), or if I don't want to wait that long I can go to the local clinic and wait for the on-call doc to see me, or if it's really serious I can go to Emergency at the hospital.

Now if you want to see a specialist then you might be waiting a while. But if the GP thinks your case is serious then they'll bump you further up the queue, and if it's really serious they can generally get you in right away.

The biggest failing is in highly specialized stuff like pediatric psychiatry, or health care for really remote areas, but I suspect that would be an issue under most forms of health care.

Comment: Is this Google's fault? (Score 1) 434

by Chirs (#49625035) Attached to: Google Can't Ignore the Android Update Problem Any Longer

Technically 5.1 is out and there's supposed to be an update coming for my Moto G, but it hasn't arrived yet. Arguably this is Moto's fault more than Google's.

That said, from what I hear Android 5.0 wasn't all that stable, so it seems likely that a lot of manufacturers just skipped it in favour of waiting for 5.1.

Comment: calculus (Score 1) 425

by Chirs (#49622951) Attached to: The Programming Talent Myth

My high school calculus teacher observed that the marks for that class over decades of teaching tended towards bimodal. To some extent, either you "got it" or you didn't.

This post (https://gasstationwithoutpumps.wordpress.com/tag/bimodal-distribution/) based on USA stats for 2010 suggests that "many of the exams that require math had this sort of bimodal distribution."

The best laid plans of mice and men are held up in the legal department.

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