Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Jezebel? (Score 1) 299

by Chalnoth (#47675111) Attached to: Writer: Internet Comments Belong On Personal Blogs, Not News Sites

1. Rapes in prisons hardly factor into the daily lives of people outside of prisons. Women in prisons face a far, far higher chance of being raped than men in prisons.

2. Women are approximately three times more likely to be on the receiving end of intimate partner violence, according to this link.

3. Black people are far, far more likely to be convicted of the same crime than white people, so it isn't at all clear that they are more violent in actuality.

Comment: Re:Jezebel? (Score 1) 299

by Chalnoth (#47667585) Attached to: Writer: Internet Comments Belong On Personal Blogs, Not News Sites

How about, "More than their percent in the population," which in this case would be about 50%. Women face injury and death in far, far higher numbers at the hands of men than the reverse. They also face rape at the hands of men in far, far higher numbers than the reverse. And when they post online, they face threats of rape in far, far higher numbers than men do.

Comment: Re:Tiemann = Messiah (Score 1) 41

by Chalnoth (#47609987) Attached to: Open Source Pioneer Michael Tiemann On Open Source Business Success

Indeed. The tone of the article was seriously grating. Open source is, I think, good for the industry as a whole. It's also good for consumers. But it is not unambiguously good for every individual software company.

I'd really like it if we could get some government regulation to promote more open source software, but saying, "This one guy I know was really really successful using open source!" in no way means that every business will be similarly successful.

Comment: Re:What about existing evidence? (Score 1) 227

by Chalnoth (#47527083) Attached to: Black Holes Not Black After All, Theorize Physicists

Obtaining observations that are close enough to the event horizon for this theoretical model to make a difference are really really difficult to perform. For instance, our current best estimates for the radius of the supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy are only able to nail it down to smaller than five and a half times the Schwarzschild radius. So I'm pretty sure that this model is well within current observational limits.

It probably won't be long, however, before we have observations that can distinguish between a Schwarzschild-radius black hole and this new model of a black hole.

Comment: Re:Absolutely - it is filthy (Score 1) 156

by Chalnoth (#47490839) Attached to: Japan To Offer $20,000 Subsidy For Fuel-Cell Cars

Electrolysis is energetically very expensive. We don't have huge amounts of electrical power to spare for such wasteful pursuits. I doubt we ever will.

My naive expectation is that fifty years from now, we'll have transitioned most of our energy over to wind and solar power, with primarily algae-based biofuels making up for situations where we need to store energy (e.g. long-distance transportation). I'm a bit skeptical that nuclear will really take off. It'd be nice if the engineering challenges for breeder reactors were overcome, but I'm not sure they will be.

Comment: Carbon impact is misleading (Score 4, Informative) 156

by Chalnoth (#47489557) Attached to: Japan To Offer $20,000 Subsidy For Fuel-Cell Cars

The issue is that the dominant technology for producing hydrogen is steam reforming, which emits carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide as byproducts. This means that hydrogen fuel cells are most definitely not "carbon free" in any reasonable sense.

Perhaps at some point in the future it will become more common to generate hydrogen through some other means that doesn't produce CO/CO2, but we're definitely not there yet. So I'm not really sure that this technology is any better than electric vehicles. (which face a similar problem, but effective technologies to produce the electricity are already cost-competitive and on the rise as a result).

Comment: Re:Dumb dumb dumb advice... (Score 1) 280

by Chalnoth (#47475145) Attached to: Selectively Reusing Bad Passwords Is Not a Bad Idea, Researchers Say

At some level, security boils down to trust. At least, it does today. You have to ensure that your password manager is controlled by an organization that you trust: one that has very strict security safeguards. I do think that LastPass meets this requirement, though you're welcome to investigate yourself.

That said, in a few years we might not be so concerned about this sort of thing. We might be using secure keys instead of passwords, such as the keys that Google is working on.

Comment: Re:Simpler approach... (Score 1) 280

by Chalnoth (#47470825) Attached to: Selectively Reusing Bad Passwords Is Not a Bad Idea, Researchers Say

If you use a password generator, it doesn't have the weaknesses you mention. It really is 5000^4 entropy. Which is about as good as an 8-character randomized password from a generator that uses 64 characters. And if you're going to consider longer passwords or using more special characters, then you should compare that against simply adding more words.

You can obviously vary the number of common words used to increase or decrease the strength of the password. The point is that random word combinations are likely going to be easier to remember.

That said, a potentially even better method is supported by LastPass's generator: generate a pronounceable password of arbitrary length. I like to use this generator for passwords that I have to enter manually.

Comment: Re:Dumb dumb dumb advice... (Score 1) 280

by Chalnoth (#47470747) Attached to: Selectively Reusing Bad Passwords Is Not a Bad Idea, Researchers Say

Except password managers are far, far easier to use than remembering the passwords for a bajillion sites. The answer to the problem of password reuse is to lower the bar to make use of a password manager at the browser level. That means having encrypted cloud storage of passwords combined with an extremely easy-to-use password generator.

I do think that Lastpass gets about 90% there, but still has some hurdles for casual users (you have to install a plugin, and some of the password generator options can be a little confusing for casual users).

Comment: Re:The Internet is meant to be anonymous (Score 1) 238

by Chalnoth (#47470007) Attached to: Pseudonyms Now Allowed On Google+

It's easy to say that when you're not at risk for harassment. Internet can and does spill over into real life, and many people in marginalized groups or politically-oppressive areas do not feel safe posting under their real names.

Implementing a real name policy, therefore, has the effect of silencing many voices of women, minorities, and people in politically-oppressive regimes.

I don't believe for a moment that it has a significant impact on trollish behavior.

"If there isn't a population problem, why is the government putting cancer in the cigarettes?" -- the elder Steptoe, c. 1970

Working...