Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Communications

Chacham's Journal: Verbiage: Mental Maturity (2) 12

Journal by Chacham

In the previous post about mental maturity, an Idealist responded with something like "it's 'we' not 'me'".

While reading John Maxwell's second chapter of an upcoming book, he speaks about maturity

Maturity is the ability to see and act on behalf of others. Immature people don't see things from someone else's point of view. They rarely concern themselves with what's best for others. In many ways, they act like small children.

I think he expresses the Idealist's mental maturity quite well. It's not just being empathic. It's being so empathic that the other is more important.

This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Verbiage: Mental Maturity (2)

Comments Filter:
  • Only compassion. In fact, the one thing that almost everybody with my disability has is an utter lack of empathy. We're immature in that way.

    Our idealism comes from needing a concrete foundation for our lives. Most autistic people I know are religious- not out of empathy for others, but out of wanting a safety net for ourselves.

    • by Chacham (981)

      the one thing that almost everybody with my disability has is an utter lack of empathy.

      Are you an Idealist (NF) or are you a Rational (NT)?

      INTPs seem (to others) to have no empathy. Jung's lifecycle (explained by Jacobi) puts F last for the ITPs.

      • I jump between the two- INFP or INTJ, with more emphasis on INFP. I'm a strong idealist, with rationalist tendencies.

        Empathy is a foreign concept to autistics; what little we see in others we suspect to be just a parlor trick.

        My love of idealism, and wish to see idealism encoded into law, comes more from my fear of change than anything else.

        • by Chacham (981)

          I jump between the two- INFP or INTJ, with more emphasis on INFP. I'm a strong idealist, with rationalist tendencies.

          INFP is dominant F, INTJ is dominant N, so that would be hard to fit into Jung's methodology.

          Empathy is a foreign concept to autistics; what little we see in others we suspect to be just a parlor trick.

          Empathy is not appreciating what you see. It is caring about another. The care brings about of feeling for their wants much as one feels for his own wants.

          My love of idealism, and wish to see i

          • Empathy is not appreciating what you see. It is caring about another. The care brings about of feeling for their wants much as one feels for his own wants.

            Exactly what I've seen some autistics label telepathy- how do you know what the other person wants? How can you tell what they want? The real answer is so strongly rooted in such things as body language and tone of voice that is simply *missing information* to the autistic.

            My fear of change has almost nothing to do with the J trait- it

            • by Chacham (981)

              Interesting. Though, i don't really know any autistic people, so i am afraid i do not appreciate the approach.

              Thanx for replying.

  • You're stopping too short, methinks. You're focused on just the advancement from the "there is only my POV" stage to the discovery that there are other people in the world who have other, differing P'sOV. So you draw a connection between mental maturity and (your definition of) empathy. But there's a more final stage where it's not just the P'sOV of you and other people, but that there can be ones that maybe aren't even being currently held by anyone!

    So mental maturity is a broadening of the mind. And givin

    • by Chacham (981)

      Hmm... I get the feeling i am being misunderstood. I also realize you are making a point. I want to address both.

      So you draw a connection between mental maturity and (your definition of) empathy.

      Yes, for the NF. Originally, though, i meant mental maturity as opposed to physical maturity. But, perhaps there is yet another split. Mental maturity has both internal and external sides. The external side would likely follow the Keirsian types.

      But there's a more final stage where it's not just the P'sOV of you and

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by Bill Dog (726542)

        I was exploring the concepts you brought up, but in general, whereas you meant to primarily examine them in the context of certain personality classifications (which I looked up for several minutes and do not understand and then unsurprisingly also do not understand how anyone except the rarest of mental deviants could be *predominately* any one of those).

        • by Chacham (981)

          how anyone except the rarest of mental deviants could be *predominately* any one of those

          Heh.

          Keirsey's types, that is the four types of temperament, have a 2000+ year history starting with Plato. Paracelsus, Spranger, and many more in between also wrote about the same four types. With so much observation of these types, perhaps they deserve a second look. Well, at least that what got me interested. 2000 years is a bit more than a fad.

          The MBTI preferences is an extension of Jung's work on brain functions, wh

          • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

            by Bill Dog (726542)

            But if you do care, i'd love to have more input on this subject.

            I'm going to make you regret that. :) As this [wikipedia.org] as a basis for reference, the 4 temperaments and the 16 role variants seem (to my untrained eye) like horoscopes -- applies to everyone. The 4 are really ridiculous, as either I'm an unusually well-balanced person and there are an appreciable number of defective personalities out there, or I'm missing something. On the 16, the most I can narrow myself down to is a I***. That is, I've always been les

            • by Chacham (981)

              I'm going to make you regret that. :)

              Heh.

              As this as a basis for reference, the 4 temperaments and the 16 role variants seem (to my untrained eye) like horoscopes -- applies to everyone.

              They do apply to everyone. The question is, what is your preference when dealing with the outside world?

              The 4 are really ridiculous, as either I'm an unusually well-balanced person and there are an appreciable number of defective personalities out there, or I'm missing something.

              Probably missing something. Sometimes, a person

How many Unix hacks does it take to change a light bulb? Let's see, can you use a shell script for that or does it need a C program?

Working...