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Comment Re:Definitely not a violation. (Score 1) 330

This was a case of an un-authorized service which creates a security hole.

No, it wasn't. The only security hole, was the security of Apple's income from customers dum enough to buy their products.

Think about this again: A non licensed repair to a car may make the car less safe, but that does not, under any circumstances give the car manufacturer the right to sneak in an willfully destroy the car. Nor does it make sense them them to do so, except to protect their own repair shop income.

Comment Re:duh (Score 1) 182

Though if they want to maximize readability, why aren't the using
fonts with the little training wheels specially designed to make
letters faster to read and easier to recognize in bad reading
conditions, what's the name: SERIF fonts!

For road signs, they don't want to maximize readability, they want
to maximize legibility, which is not the same thing.

No, but serif fonts are also more legible. It was previously believed sans-serif were better at this, but new research is proving it wrong. When we can't see a shape clearly we guess details, this is why with a sans-serif fonts, c e a all look like o or s (depending on the person) at a distiance. Add serifs to those shapes, and the breaks in round shape warns the brain that it is not an o.

Comment Re:duh (Score 1) 182

Open Source highway gothic font created by Red Hat.

http://overpassfont.org/

Problem solved.

Another link: http://www.fontsquirrel.com/fo...

While highway gothis was more readable than the clearview. This version doesn't help.

Though if they want to maximize readability, why aren't the using fonts with the little training wheels specially designed to make letters faster to read and easier to recognize in bad reading conditions, what's the name: SERIF fonts!

It seems to be a global mistake though.

Comment Re:The earth is flat? (Score 1) 234

Actually, according to them the North Pole really isn't the issue. It's the South Pole that doesn't exist. Instead there's a wall of ice around Antarctica that's guarded by NASA employees to keep people from finding the truth (I'm not actually making that up, unfortunately).

But they are. Flat Earth Society was founded by physicists to make fun of creationists, it is a parody of creationism. Unfortunately Poe's Law applies to some people and they end up believing in the parody.

Comment Re:A good thing? (Score 1) 160

Anything to force vendors to, you know, provide up-to-date software. Unfortunately, this probably won't have much of an effect...

Even the most up-to-date software allows a user to be an idiot and install untrusted software and give it permission to take his phone ransom. It is not abusing a software vulnerablity, but an idiot user vulnerablity, and those are not easily fixed without taking away user freedom.

Comment Re:QWERTZ auch (Score 1) 315

I occasionally have to type in French, but I can't stand using AZERTY.

Setting an English keyboard to Welsh/UK extended allows you to enter them with combinations of Alt-Gr and dead keys. Before I accidentally discovered this, I had to faff around with charmap.

There is also a keymap called US international that does something similar and turns the accents into dead-keys and the right-alt into AltGr. It makes writing real text with a US keyboard halfway plausible

Comment Re:Trump just says stuff (Score 1) 875

If you vote republican and accept Medicare and social security you are a hypocrite.

Hardly! That is not how a representative democracy works. You vote for who and to a lessor extent how you think things ought to be and then you play by the rules the winners set for society. Its does not make someone a hypocrite for accepting medicare or social security, while voting to end them. Since that person does not get a choice about paying medicare and social security taxes while they are working, they are as entitled as everyone else to accept the benefit.

Accept it as a good policy, not accept it as a personal gain once it is already there. There is a difference.

Comment Re:"just a century"? (Score 1) 412

I guess it could have been build over thousands of years, but most of the time when we haven't been recording it and when we did photograph the star 100 years ago covering parts of the star we couldn't see, and now the structure is rotating into our line of sight (possibly again) covering it a bit, until it rotates out of sight again. Or it could be a gas cloud that we are now seeing through at the worst angle. In both case it should slowly go away again as they rotate and or out viewing angle subtle changes.

Comment Re:"Support" vs "Use all the bells and whistles"? (Score 1) 458

A Skylake processor is a lot more than the CPU. For instance it also contains a new generation of GPU that needs to be supported, on top of that a Skylake system comes with a new chipset, with new generations of all controllers, USB, Ethernet, etc.. Many of these new devices needs new drivers.

Comment Re:That, and with contractual agreement not to use (Score 1) 127

Most international and US domestic employees include clauses in the employee contract that explicitly permit company monitoring of content on work owned or devices, including work owned telephones and networks. There is effectively no "private communication" on your corporate laptop or machines you use for work.

And those clauses would in invalid in Germany and many other countries and any company trying to enforce it would be commiting crimes.

... unfortunately. Why is "work resources = work-related matters" so unreasonable?

Because we are not slaves?

Comment Re:Correct me if I am wrong (Score 1) 60

But since this is a client bug, you would actually have to connect to a malicious SSHD session, correct?

If that is the case... I don't see how this is a huge deal. Who SSH's to weird unknown servers?

It is pretty common for git. Upload your public key and then connect using git over SSH. All it takes from then is to compromise the git-servers, or use a DNS attack to get the connection to the wrong servers.

Comment Re:That, and with contractual agreement not to use (Score 2) 127

Most international and US domestic employees include clauses in the employee contract that explicitly permit company monitoring of content on work owned or devices, including work owned telephones and networks. There is effectively no "private communication" on your corporate laptop or machines you use for work.

And those clauses would in invalid in Germany and many other countries and any company trying to enforce it would be commiting crimes.

Comment Re:Simple explanation (Score 1) 165

So, your program allocates some memory. Should it initialize the memory to make sure it's all a bunch of zeros? Apparently, Nvidia doesn't think so. So, a program running on your OS requests some memory. Should the OS initialize the memory before handing it to the application? Apparently, Apple doesn't think so. Either answer is right.

Not really. An application will typically allocate and release memory all the time, being forced to clear it every time is massive overkill and a performance problem. The driver exposes the GPU memory, the OS allocates it to applications just like with RAM. It's the only one that knows when memory switches application context and must be cleared. So there's really only one sane solution.

No. The driver knows as well. There is a concept called OpenGL contexts, and they can be configured to share texture data with eachother, the problem is that the driver leaks texture-data between contexts that shouldn't be sharing texture data. They perfectly well know those contexts should not be sharing texture data.

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