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Comment: Re:Here we go again (Score 1) 475

by Carewolf (#48438115) Attached to: As Amazon Grows In Seattle, Pay Equity For Women Declines

It's more subtle than that. Better paying jobs are more likely to go to men, so a women with similar qualifications and experience is likely, on average, to earn less than a man. It's easy to fix too, just make the jobs more accessible to female candidates. Obviously you still hire the best candidate, it's not about favouritism.

For example, a lot of well paying jobs are found through networking. If most of your current employees are male and network with other males, you are less likely to get female candidates applying or head hunted. All you need to do to correct that is to make an effort to network with women, and maybe ask some of the women in your company to put the word out. It benefits you because you have a wider pool of talent to pick from. It's actually dumb not to do it.

There is also bias at the hiring stage that can be eliminated. Some managers don't want to hire women because they worry that they will go on maternity leave or quit completely if they get pregnant. That one is harder to deal with, but does again exclude good candidates and diversity from the company.

How would that help tech companies to hire female tech talent that does not exist?

How do you suggest we get around the problem of companies trying to hire equally in a field that women dispite heavy positive discrimination on their behalf choose not to enter?

Comment: Re:In Order To Meet Contract Obligations (Score 1) 70

in order to meet "obligations under a contract"

Coming soon from ISPs: Legalese buried deep in your contract with them that essentially states "We [the ISP] have the contractual obligation to muck with any website as we see fit whenever we want to do so."

They're contractually obligated to slow down your Netflix speeds because they really wanted to and the contract means they are now obligated to slow down Netflix.

Yeah. The idea is not bad, but that is how it would end unless they demand it to be very explicit. Basically this is how everybody already sells fixed phone lines. The phone lines have a reserved bandwidth that can't be used by the internet though it uses the same line of copper or fiber, but that bandwidth is not advertised as part of the internet connection. I think if it is fine that they can do all kinds of crazy things, they just can't call it internet or broadband and can't advertise bandwidth not treated neutrally as part of their broadband offering.

Comment: Re:Also in iBooks (Score 1) 102

But there can still be in-book purchases.

Pay $1.99 at the end of chapter 10 or the author kills off your favourite character.

Which is why the extra label below warning about in-app purchaces is a good idea. Still haven't seen that with books though, but if they keep getting away with it elsewhere it is just a matter of time.

Comment: Re:Go back in time 5 years (Score 1) 534

by Carewolf (#48424445) Attached to: Debian Votes Against Mandating Non-systemd Compatibility

Can you boot with init=/systemd/init/from/6/months/ago ?

Yeah, that's how modular it is. People don't care if things are in separate processes; we care whether it's highly coupled. ... Please don't overwrite /sbin/init with an older version, you want to be able to get back to a working system :)

Yes. I am running Debian. At the moment I can even install sysv-init or openrc init and replace systemd with it. In the future that might make some other unrelated packages uninstall, but currently it still works just fine.

Comment: Re:Go back in time 5 years (Score 2) 534

by Carewolf (#48417975) Attached to: Debian Votes Against Mandating Non-systemd Compatibility

All so completely co-dependent that they are an all or nothing proposition. Thus, one massive program.

No it isn't. It is completely modular. In only have the init part installed, I can choose to opt in to other modules as I wish. It is all one project, but it is a MODULAR project.

Comment: Re:How much longer will Foxconn need Apple? (Score 1) 107

by Carewolf (#48415923) Attached to: Nokia's N1 Android Tablet Is Actually a Foxconn Tablet

Even basic stuff like copying memory from one location in the CPU to another location is drastically faster on an iOS processor.

That would not mean anything about the CPU. Copying memory is limited by memory speed. Nice that they have fast memory though. Maybe the other tablets need to use faster memory chips too.

Comment: Re:"...moving east." (Score 1) 69

by Carewolf (#48410003) Attached to: Fascinating Rosetta Image Captures Philae's Comet Bounce

What if it is spinning on more than one axis, ie tumbling? The direction where the sun rises for a given point on the comet will change all the time.

I have no idea if the comet is actually doing this, but I imagine that being a scenario where computing "east" being rather difficult.

A ball at least can only rotate around one axis (any superposition of two rotations can be described as a single combined rotation), but the poster above me had the better answer. East is the direction of the rotation, it just happens to also be where everything stationary or far away that is not constantly visible would rise.

Comment: Re:Paralyzed yet Fully Aware (Score 1) 105

by Carewolf (#48397003) Attached to: How To Anesthetize an Octopus

This reminds me of the cases where they used Curare for anesthesia. Turns out all it was doing was paralyzing the motor systems so the still fully conscious patients couldn't scream or otherwise react as the surgeons operated.

Might be a good idea to ask the octopuses afterwards if they remember from during the anesthetized time period. This can be done and would find out if they're really out cold or if they're just locked in.

Actually that would require two of the three drugs to fail. They give or gave one to paralyze you, one to kill pain and one to shut off short term memory. The scary part was that sometimes the painkiller failed, so the patiant would be awake fealing pain, but they would not remember it afterwards unless the memory drug also failed.

Comment: Re:Stupid, trucks cause the problem (Score 1) 554

by Carewolf (#48394989) Attached to: The Downside to Low Gas Prices

none of that has anything to do with our spending on roads, we have a spending problem to begin with. we would have plenty of money to fix our roads if we stopped spending it on social programs and wars and went back to the basics.

Ha, no! If you cut down on social programs you would have less money as more people would fall into inescapable poverty and be unable to contribute to your society...

Comment: Re:You don't have it straight ... (Score 1) 328

by Carewolf (#48394969) Attached to: Former Police Officer Indicted For Teaching How To Pass a Polygraph Test

... a former police officer has been dragged into court by the U.S. Department of Justice for teaching people how to beat a pseudoscientific method of detecting whether somebody is lying, a method that itself isn't even admissible as evidence courts in most parts of the world? What's next? Will the surgeon general drag people into court for pointing out that when consuming a homeopathic remedy with 30C dilution, one would need to swallow a volume greater than all the water present in all the oceans of our entire planet in order to stand a good chance of swallowing just one molecule of the original substance?

He entered into a conspiracy to lie to government investigators.

Here I thought he was teaching people how to see through the lies of government investigators.

From the indictment: "trained an individual posing as a federal law enforcement officer to lie and conceal involvement in criminal activity from an internal agency investigation"

Since polygraphs are not working, the investigators claim they do, and the only effect they have is if people believe in them.

So they are useful, a prop of intimidation. Belief trumps reality. If a subject is tricked into honesty or tricked into avoiding circumstances where they will face a polygraph its a win from the government's perspective.

Another prop could be police brutalitu, are you pro that too, or are your fascist tendencies limited to quack science?

Comment: Re:Check your local community first (Score 1) 111

by Carewolf (#48394963) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Who's the Doctors Without Borders of Technology?

but many people in the world need basic services like toilets a lot more than they need electronics.

You would be surprised. After the earthquake in Haiti one of the main problems ended up being setting up electronic infrastructure for all the other workers coming in rebuilding and treating victims. Everybody send doctors and construction workers, but it became a real mess when noone send computer experts to set up internet and cellphone infrastructure for the doctors, engineers, construction workers and not least thousands of journalists to use.

Comment: Re:You don't have it straight ... (Score 1) 328

by Carewolf (#48393595) Attached to: Former Police Officer Indicted For Teaching How To Pass a Polygraph Test

... a former police officer has been dragged into court by the U.S. Department of Justice for teaching people how to beat a pseudoscientific method of detecting whether somebody is lying, a method that itself isn't even admissible as evidence courts in most parts of the world? What's next? Will the surgeon general drag people into court for pointing out that when consuming a homeopathic remedy with 30C dilution, one would need to swallow a volume greater than all the water present in all the oceans of our entire planet in order to stand a good chance of swallowing just one molecule of the original substance?

He entered into a conspiracy to lie to government investigators.

Here I thought he was teaching people how to see through the lies of government investigators. Since polygraphs are not working, the investigators claim they do, and the only effect they have is if people believe in them.

The biggest mistake you can make is to believe that you are working for someone else.

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