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Comment: Re:Dear Hugh: (Score 1) 948

by CaptainPatent (#38680784) Attached to: Do Companies Punish Workers Who Take Vacations?
Maybe you misunderstood what I was saying.

This doesn't affect me at all. My job is production based so as long as I do what I need to do, I'm good. While there are bad weeks where I have to put in 60+ hours, a fair number are great and I only need to put in 20-30 so it balances out well. They're also good about time off and vacation so for me there aren't many worries.

I got to this position because I earned my Computer Engineering degree and work as a skilled laborer. There are many people that have jobs that are far less skilled making them more and more expendable. Some people like this are in a position where one of the only things they can get going for them is the knowledge they can be walked all over.

And you can unionize unskilled labor all you want... When it gets to pricey, it'll just be moved away like so many other jobs to governments who give even less of a f**k. Even skilled labor can run into problems if there's decent competition.

Perhaps add this episode of This American Life to your playlist to see how depressing that situation currently is. It talks about Shenzhen and not just worker rights abuses there, but human rights abuses faced by employees.

Comment: Dear Hugh: (Score 2) 948

by CaptainPatent (#38679370) Attached to: Do Companies Punish Workers Who Take Vacations?
While my job is largely production based, the unemployment rate is currently 8.5%

I think most people would rather not be seen as being in the bottom 50% of workers where they are for fear of layoffs or any sort of cutback.

I think most people would rather take a small increase in work-stress to forgo a lot of financial related stress down the road.

+ - On the destructive nature of narcissist CEOs->

Submitted by bdking
bdking (1938328) writes "You need a healthy ego to be a chief executive. But if a healthy ego spills over into narcissism, it can lead to all kinds of trouble for a company. Research shows that narcissist CEOs tend to spend more, overpay for acquisitions and ignore objective measures of their performance, creating a situation where shareholder value can easily be destroyed."
Link to Original Source
Space

+ - 'Saturn on Steroids' Exoplanet Discovered?->

Submitted by
astroengine
astroengine writes "By analyzing the silhouette of an exoplanet passing in front of its parent star 420 light-years away, astronomers have discovered what may be a large gas giant world sporting a ring system. Could it be Saturn's twin? Possibly.

"When I first saw the light curve, I knew we had found a very weird and unique object," said University of Rochester astronomer Eric Mamajek. "After we ruled out the eclipse being due to a spherical star or a circumstellar disk passing in front of the star, I realized that the only plausible explanation was some sort of dust ring system orbiting a smaller companion — basically a 'Saturn on steroids.'""

Link to Original Source

+ - The author of SOPA is a copyright violator->

Submitted by
TheNextCorner
TheNextCorner writes "Lamar Smith is the author of the SOPA bill, a US congress member and supposedly an expert on copyright. The author of this article checked the website of Smith, and found some interesting facts!

I contacted DJ, to find out if Lamar had asked permission to use the image and he told me that he had no record of Lamar, or anyone from his organization, requesting permission to use it: "I switched my images from traditional copyright protection to be protected under the Creative Commons license a few years ago, which simply states that they can use my images as long as they attribute the image to me and do not use it for commercial purposes."

Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Cell jammer (Score 1) 1003

by CaptainPatent (#38387620) Attached to: Why the NTSB Is Wrong About Cellphones
Awesome Idea - until the person beside you is using the cell network to navigate and is quietly listening to directions until the cellphone stops working.

Then distracted by the lack of directions starts messing with the phone to fix the problem getting far more distracted from the road than they already were.

Or someone who is texting every couple of minutes... instead of hanging on to the phone for a few seconds at a time they'll now probably study the phone until the text goes through... which will be far longer.

Or worst yet, someone who needs the phone for a true emergency.

Man, that sounds like it will make drivers less distracted *rolls eyes* And don't get me wrong - I don't advocate actively using your phone while driving at all, but your "solution" will at best do nothing, and at worst just create a bigger problem.

Comment: Re:32 GB in my Mac Pro (Score 4, Informative) 543

by CaptainPatent (#38065586) Attached to: RAM in my most-used personal computer:

Memory is the first thing you should upgrade, followed by an SSD.

One size does not fit all.

There are valid reasons that memory should be a primary concern for upgrade just as there are valid reasons your processor, video card, or hard drive may be more optimal for immediate upgrade. While this is an extreme example, I guarantee an old Duron processor running in a server motherboard with 16GB of ram will lose every benchmark test to a new i7 running alongside 2GB of ram.

It also depends on what you're doing:
Is it a file server for a small set of files? - the solid state would probably be better.
Is it a gaming machine? Perhaps a video card or better processor would be more cost-effective.

I'm not saying that more memory is bad, I just hate it when people think it's a one-size-fits-all scenario.

Comment: Re:Old computers don't die, they just get repurpos (Score 1) 317

by CaptainPatent (#37266210) Attached to: I've lost more computers to ...
I used to have this same mentality. At one point in my college dorm I had 7 different computers running as everything from a homebuilt linux router to a fileserver to a compile server I could offload long compile jobs to. Sadly both marriage and no longer having free unlimited power have changed that. I have to justify having the computers around that I do and many of the old ones get pruned out by my wife. I've found out that having an effective virtual machine setup on a couple higher efficiency new or new-ish computers is actually cheaper in the long run than keeping old ones around. Afterall - instead of paying between $20 and $30 per month per additional computer for any ~200W always-on system in addition to your main higher-end computers, it's much more cost effective to buy a $400 tower (or cheaper in many cases) and conglomerate all of your always-on functionality into VMs on one box. I personally save up to $60 per month just by combining a few of my lower horsepower boxes and only running 3 now (mainbox / DVR / VM taskbox.) it makes up that $400 cost in very little time at all.

Reference the NULL within NULL, it is the gateway to all wizardry.

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