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Submission + - Virgin Galactic SpaceShipTwo's Re-entry Tech: The Feather

Dutch Gun writes: When most people think about rocket science, they think of the challenge of getting a spacecraft into space. However, the problem of safely re-entering the atmosphere is a daunting challenge as well. Virgin Galactic introduces us to the concept of "the feather", their term for the combination of fixed-wing and capsule based solutions both used by spaceships in the past, and explain how they believe this hybrid approach to be a superior solution.

SpaceShipTwo folds its wings in the initial decent, acting a bit like a badminton shuttlecock, when a capsule decent has the most advantages. In the latter part of the decent, the wings are extended, giving the vehicle the advantages of a glider-like landing.

Submission + - The Courage of Bystanders Who Press 'Record' writes: Robinson Meyer writes in The Atlantic that in the past year, after the killings of Michael Brown and Tamir Rice, many police departments and police reformists have agreed on the necessity of police-worn body cameras. But the most powerful cameras aren’t those on officer’s bodies but those wielded by bystanders. We don’t yet know who shot videos of officer officer, Michael T. Slager, shooting Walter Scott eight times as he runs away but "unknown cameramen and women lived out high democratic ideals: They watched a cop kill someone, shoot recklessly at someone running away, and they kept the camera trained on the cop," writes Robinson. "They were there, on an ordinary, hazy Saturday morning, and they chose to be courageous. They bore witness, at unknown risk to themselves."

“We have been talking about police brutality for years. And now, because of videos, we are seeing just how systemic and widespread it is,” tweeted Deray McKesson, an activist in Ferguson, after the videos emerged Tuesday night. “The videos over the past seven months have empowered us to ask deeper questions, to push more forcefully in confronting the system.” The process of ascertaining the truth of the world has to start somewhere. A video is one more assertion made about what is real concludes Robinson. "Today, through some unknown hero’s stubborn internal choice to witness instead of flee, to press record and to watch something terrible unfold, we have one more such assertion of reality."

Submission + - Officer Not Charged In Michael Brown Shooting ( 3

An anonymous reader writes: A grand jury in Missouri has decided there is no probable cause to charge police officer Darren Wilson in the shooting death of Michael Brown. "A grand jury of nine whites and three blacks had been meeting weekly since Aug. 20 to consider evidence. At least nine votes would have been required to indict Wilson. The Justice Department is conducting an investigation into possible civil rights violations that could result in federal charges." Government officials and Brown's family are urging calm in Ferguson after the contentious protests that followed Brown's death.

Submission + - Thrust: Chromium-based cross-platform / cross-language application framework (

Captain Arr Morgan writes: "Thrust is require/import-able, it lets you distribute NodeJS, Go or Python GUI apps directly through their native package managers.

Thrust is based on Chromium's Content Module and is supported on Linux, MacOSX and Windows"

And being based on Chromium (libchromiumcontent to be specific) it provides backing for building a browser but is not limited to. Unlike other application frameworks like atom-shell or node-webkit, Thrust does not embed any specific language runtime (like NodeJS in both their cases) but uses a local RPC so any language can provide a binding. As an example, I've create a (janky) browser in about 6KB of Javascript. JankyBrowser

Submission + - Was really compromised? (

Captain Arr Morgan writes: Just yesterday Slashdot reported had been compromised ( ) to serve malware.

But on the same day the jQuery blog reported they (along with RiskIQ) were unable to actually find evidence that the compromise took place. Is this sensationalism? Why did both groups report different findings on the same day? More importantly, did the compromise actually happen?

"Sometimes insanity is the only alternative" -- button at a Science Fiction convention.