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Comment: Re:Again? (Score 1) 557

by CaptSolo (#46937727) Attached to: Actual Results of Crimean Secession Vote Leaked

Intercepted phone call (video w. English subs) re. how Russian politicians are orchestrating the May 11 "referendum" in Donestk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?...

In Crimea vote they might have been more subtle but there still were armed "pro-Russia" forces (in contact w. Russia) inciting and carrying out Crimea vote. When you hear text like this re. Donetsk (in the link above):

"write something like 99% [voting "yes"] down - are you going to [actually] walk around and collect [vote] papers? are you fucking insane?"

... it casts more doubt on the Crimea vote too. After all, same forces are working in both places.

Comment: Latency vs. bandwidth (Score 1) 151

by aharth (#37256538) Attached to: Google and OpenDNS Work On Global Internet Speedup
There are two factors that affect the performance of web (HTTP) lookups: latency and bandwidth. Latency depends on the distance between client and server. You won't be able to send data faster than the speed of light. Bringing the data closer to the client helps to reduce latency, especially for small lookups. Bandwidth becomes the limiting factor when you transfer (large amounts of) data over under-dimensioned pipes. In general, I'd be a much more happy person if people would use HTTP caching headers (Expires and such) more often, as then a Squid proxy can bring substantial performance gains.

Comment: Linked Data? (Score 1) 62

by aharth (#31419106) Attached to: Open Data Needs Open Source Tools
Semantic Web technologies (in particular RDF, a graph-structured data format) are ideally suited for publishing data. Also, these technologies facilitate the integration of separate pieces of information; integration is what you want to do if thousands of people start publishing structured data. Linked Data (RDF using HTTP URIs to identify things) is already used by the NYT and the UK government to publish data online.

Comment: Re:Data Search Interface (Score 1) 65

by aharth (#30840246) Attached to: Attractive Open Source Search Interfaces?
Yes, the better the data the better the system will work. However, VisiNav works quite well on relatively scruffy web data due to the integrated ranking component.
The underlying data has to be in graph-structured format (in RDF syntax); reasoning, most notably object consolidation, is supported via OWL. Once the data is indexed, users can search and browse right away. There's no configuration needed, because the ordering of data is done based on the calculated ranks. The UI can be configured via XSLT and CSS for adding a logo or changing the look and feel.
We've developed VisiNav as part of a research project, and the university owns (and manages) the IP. I guess they will make it available free of charge for educational and research organisations, but commercial applications would require a license.

Comment: Data Search Interface (Score 1) 65

by aharth (#30759202) Attached to: Attractive Open Source Search Interfaces?
Hi, there's also VisiNav which lets you assemble complex queries over data, covering keyword search and faceted browsing (as Flamenco) and a bit more (path navigation). Drag and drop UI, where people who don't know facets or path navigation can do keyword search without being distracted. -- Andreas. Disclaimer: I'm one of the developers of VisiNav.

+ - UPC Ireland latest to do a DNS hijacking trial->

Submitted by CaptSolo
CaptSolo (899152) writes "UPC Ireland has started a trial of a DNS hijacking "service", in a violation of net neutrality. When users enter a URL for a non-existing domain, they are redirected to a landing page (for example, this). They do provide instructions for disabling this service, consisting of a PDF with screenshots demonstrating how Windows users can change DNS servers.

An example log of a hijacked HTTP request: http://gist.github.com/211317

Related: http://slashdot.org/story/09/08/05/1926257/Comcast-the-Latest-ISP-To-Try-DNS-Hijacking"

Link to Original Source

+ - Cisco, Nokia take aim at net neutrality->

Submitted by
angry tapir
angry tapir writes "FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski announced last month that he would seek to develop formal rules prohibiting Internet service providers from selectively blocking or slowing Web content and applications. However, 44 companies — including Cisco Systems, Alcatel-Lucent, Corning, Ericsson, Motorola and Nokia — have sent a letter to the FCC saying new regulations could hinder the development of the Internet. A group of 18 Republican U.S. senators have also sent a letter to Genachowski raising concerns about net neutrality regulations"
Link to Original Source

+ - What makes a beautiful machine? 1

Submitted by
Nefarious Wheel
Nefarious Wheel writes "One of the great perks of the company where I work is a huge variety of technical magazines in the coffee room, often having to do with industrial machinery, the aircraft industry, logistics, the world of the intensely practical application. Leafing through these I'm struck by how some very mundane machinery is really very beautiful. I guess form follows function, and beauty is in the eye of the beholder, but — why are some machines just simply beautiful to look at? Is it a case of things attracting us for monkey reasons, or intelligence crossing the barrier to emotion because of some line drawn by an artist masquerading as an engineer? Why is the nacelle of a commercial jet, a scanning electron microscope, a magnet of the LHC beautiful, when it was designed entirely to suit a practical purpose?"

+ - IntelliJ Goes Open Source->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "IntelliJ IDEA, the popular closed-source Java IDE is to go partially open source with the introduction of a new community version Jetbrains have announced. The community addition includes full Java code support — various refactorings and code inspections, coding assistance; debugging, TestNG and JUnit testing; CVS, Subversion and Git support; Ant and Maven build integration; and Groovy and Scala support (through a separate plugin). The commercial Ultimate Edition will add support for features such as Android, GWT, Flex, JEE and OSGi"
Link to Original Source

Comment: Future Internet Symposium 2009 (Score 1) 370

by aharth (#29201845) Attached to: Who Will Fix the Internet? No One, Apparently
There's the Future Internet Symposium 2009 (http://www.fis2009.org/ ) in Berlin next week which exactly targets the topic in the post. From the call for papers: "With over a billion users today's Internet is arguably the most successful human artifact ever created. The Internet's physical infrastructure, software, and content now play an integral part of the lives of everyone on the planet, whether they interact with it directly or not. Now nearing its fifth decade, the Internet has shown remarkable resilience and flexibility in the face of ever increasing numbers of users, data volume, and changing usage patterns, but faces growing challenges in meetings the needs of our knowledge society. Yet, Internet access moves increasingly from fixed to mobile, the trend towards mobile usage is undeniable and predictions are that by 2014 about 2 billion users will access the Internet via mobile broadband services. This adds a further layer of complexity to the already immense challenges."

It is wrong always, everywhere and for everyone to believe anything upon insufficient evidence. - W. K. Clifford, British philosopher, circa 1876

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