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Comment: Re:This is a bit wrongfooted. (Score 1) 269

by CanHasDIY (#47808379) Attached to: In Maryland, a Soviet-Style Punishment For a Novelist

They're looking for crazies that go on shooting sprees. What they should be doing is checking EVERYONE... not just people that publish books about school shootings while working at schools.

I frankly don't have a problem with them investigating the guy so long as they do it respectfully. That said, everyone should be checked out. These mass shootings are just crazy people acting out. Nothing more.

OR, and I know this is a long shot, but they could consider accepting that a free nation is an inherently dangerous one, and either accept that individuals have a right to live their lives without constantly being spied upon by a crazy government so paranoid it makes tweekers seem like reasonable people, or find some other, "safer" country to move to.

I know - leaving other people to their business so long as it's not directly and immediately affecting you - crazy idea, right?

Comment: Re:change.org petition (Score 1) 269

by CanHasDIY (#47808339) Attached to: In Maryland, a Soviet-Style Punishment For a Novelist

Has *anything* ever changed from having a bunch of people sign a change.org petition?

People have signed Change.org petitions about things, and those things have changed.

Proof of causation? No, but equally, proof that signing Change.org petitions may not be wasted effort.

Are you sure you're not thinking of "We The People" petitions?

Comment: Re:Union? (Score 1) 269

by CanHasDIY (#47808217) Attached to: In Maryland, a Soviet-Style Punishment For a Novelist

Yeah, I think we're missing a big chunk of the story. He constitutionally can't be held against his will unless he's being charged with a crime past a certain point (24 hours I think?)

Not to mention, one is typically "arrested" in conjunction with being charged with a crime, not kidnapped for "emergency medical evaluation"

Comment: Re:Property rights (Score 1) 198

by CanHasDIY (#47807939) Attached to: Hidden Obstacles For Delivery Drones

The various flight ceilings on commercial aviation might speak to that, but I seriously doubt any court is going to interpret the law as being about property rights as opposed to public safety / nuisance.

I used to seriously doubt that any court in the US would allow a lawsuit against an inanimate object, but apparently many municipal governments make fat bank doing just that, all the time, with Philadelphia leading the pack.

Now I know better than to "seriously doubt" any of the the idiotic things our legal system allows for.

Comment: Re:The main problem: they don't make sense (Score 1) 198

by CanHasDIY (#47807881) Attached to: Hidden Obstacles For Delivery Drones

Further to this. If we do see self driving vehicles any time soon I would have thought that would have been infinitely preferable to drones. Some kind of system that gets you to meet the truck - calling or texting minutes before arrival. A bay that only has your parcel in it.

A lot of parcels are shipped in standard boxes these days so that shouldn't be too difficult a system to build. It wouldn't replace a driver with odd or bulky parcels of course.

If you're going to go that route with it, society could easily start building both residential and commercial structures with built-in receptacle ports designed to mate with the port on the delivery vehicle, eliminating the "someone needs to be there to accept delivery" issue.

That is, presuming the industry standardizes the port design, rather than every single manufacturer having a proprietary one that nobody else's equipment will fit.

Comment: Re:Do not want (Score 1) 198

by CanHasDIY (#47807047) Attached to: Hidden Obstacles For Delivery Drones

Drone delivery may be good for a farm out in the country where we don't want to waste time sending a truck and driver to the only order in fifty miles.

Well, except the fact that most figures I've seen show there is no efficient, cost-effective way to build a drone that can carry 50+ lbs and have over 100 miles of range.

At those rates, you'd be better off sending a dude in a truck.

Comment: Re:Do not want (Score 1) 198

by CanHasDIY (#47807033) Attached to: Hidden Obstacles For Delivery Drones

And how exactly is a drone supposed to make a delivery to my apartment on the 56th floor in the middle of Manhattan?

It could deliver to the roof. Then you could go up and get it, or a robot could bring it to your apartment.

What happens when it's raining? Does the drone/robot just dump your shit in a puddle?

Anyway, this idea means building the infrastructure in to every single existing and new high-rise building, and passing the costs along to the residents.

How, again, is this supposed to be an improvement over the current method of paying some guy $12/hr to drive around dropping off boxes?

Comment: Re:Do not want (Score 1) 198

by CanHasDIY (#47807001) Attached to: Hidden Obstacles For Delivery Drones

The number of UAVs it would take to replace a single FedEx or UPS truck would certainly be several orders of magnitude noisier.

Not to mention, it seems like it would be far more expensive.

What do you suppose is the annual TCO on all the drones that would be in the aforementioned, hypothetical fleet? Not just cheap toys, but robust airframes capable of carrying 50 lbs+ loads over several miles of space? Figure that up, then compare it to how much it costs to pay 1 guy $12.50/hr, or $26,000/yr, to drive a truck that runs about $10,000/yr to own.

Comment: Re: Two words: (Score 1) 198

by CanHasDIY (#47806949) Attached to: Hidden Obstacles For Delivery Drones

People like you are why we cant have nice things.

You can have all the nice things you want, provided you're not using them to violate the private property rights of others.

What you mean to say here is, "People like you are why I can't ignore your rights and play with my toys as I please."

I'm glad for people like them.

Comment: Actually Slower than Walking to the Damn Thing (Score 2) 64

by CanHasDIY (#47786657) Attached to: Robot Printer Brings Documents To Your Desk

From TFS:

Once the printer receives the job, it moves to the intended recipient who then has to display a smart card to activate printing.

So, instead of:

- send my job to the printer

- walk all of 10 feet to pick it up,

I now have to:

- send the print job

- wait for the printer to finish with the last person

- wait for the printer to get to my desk from $deity-knows-where in the building (and it's a big fucking building)

- wave some card at the printer

- wait for the printer to finish and go away.

Talk about "technology for technology's sake." I've seen drunk frat boys invent more useful shit than this.

What this country needs is a good five dollar plasma weapon.

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