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Comment: Actually Slower than Walking to the Damn Thing (Score 2) 64

by CanHasDIY (#47786657) Attached to: Robot Printer Brings Documents To Your Desk

From TFS:

Once the printer receives the job, it moves to the intended recipient who then has to display a smart card to activate printing.

So, instead of:

- send my job to the printer

- walk all of 10 feet to pick it up,

I now have to:

- send the print job

- wait for the printer to finish with the last person

- wait for the printer to get to my desk from $deity-knows-where in the building (and it's a big fucking building)

- wave some card at the printer

- wait for the printer to finish and go away.

Talk about "technology for technology's sake." I've seen drunk frat boys invent more useful shit than this.

Comment: Re:Slashdot comments indicative of the problem (Score 1) 1215

Somebody created an account just to harass a person whose honesty has come into question before, and they just so happened to do it less than 5 minutes before someone who wasn't logged in and didn't do an actual search somehow found the user page?

Sounds like someone doesn't know how Twitter works.

Actually, I do, which is why I find the screenshot questionable - the only way to get such as screen in that exact format would be to deliberately try and hide your tracks (logging out, clearing the search bar before taking the screenshot, etc). Deliberation implies intent.

Let's say someone else follows her. They see the @her tweets. So they see it, and make the screen capture. But, they don't want to get involved in the mess, so they save the search, log out, and paste in the URL, showing the tweets in that search, without showing the person who captured it or how they searched for it.

Again, deliberation - the narrative could just as easily be that someone created a fake account, sent a handful of tweets, then did the search/logout/paste trick to cover their tracks.

My point is, we don't know the truth, and being American I tend to default to the belief of innocence until guilt is proven, which the plaintiff has failed to do thus far.

You realize you just contradicted yourself here, right? If trust is a binary decision, than the statement "Trust all the time isn't the same as trust everyone all the time." would be invalid, since it implies degrees of trust rather than a "yes/no" configuration.

No. That's not a contradiction. Trust is binary.

If trust is "true/false," and trust is necessary to live in a society, Then why won't you give me your banking access information? You trust me, right?

But trust isn't a single act. It's a binary between "yes" or "no" but not for all options. If your friend has been playing the "pull the chair" joke, you could trust your chair to hold you, but not trust it to be there. You still have trust all the time, just not in everything all the time. I trust that my next breath will contain oxygen. That is permanent, unless I'm in a fire or otherwise in trouble. But that doesn't mean that I have to trust everything all the time. Just that not trusting anything at any point in time would result in paralysis, and is mostly impossible. 10 minutes of analysis of the air before each breath isn't sustainable.

Methinks, in this paragraph, you are conflating "trust" with knowledge. See, I don't "trust" a chair to hold me, because that would imply that I don't know the condition of the chair prior to sitting in it. I know it will hold me, because I visually (and perhaps physically) verified the integrity of the structure prior to sitting in it. Same with the air you breathe - you're not "trusting it to contain oxygen," you know it contains breathable oxygen. That's why you don't try to breathe underwater - not because you don't trust water, but because you know that there's no breathable oxygen in it.

"Verify, then trust," makes a hell of a lot more sense than the inverse.

+ - Fraunhofer's Google Glass App Detects Human Emotions in Real Time->

Submitted by Zothecula
Zothecula (1870348) writes "Over a number of years, researchers at Germany's Fraunhofer Institute have developed software to measure human emotion through face detection and analysis. Dubbed SHORE (Sophisticated High-speed Object Recognition), the technology has the potential to aid communication for those with disabilities. Now the team has repurposed the software as an app for Google Glass, with a view to bringing its emotion-detecting technology to the world."
Link to Original Source

+ - DeepFlight Dragon Set to Usher in the Era of the Personal Submarine->

Submitted by Zothecula
Zothecula (1870348) writes "No one with red blood in their veins buys a sports car and hands the keys to a chauffeur, so one of the barriers to truly personal submarining has long been the need for a trained pilot, not to mention the massive logistics involved in transporting, garaging and launching the underwater craft ... until now. Pioneering underwater aviation company DeepFlight is set to show an entirely new type of personal submarine at the 2014 Monaco Yacht Show next week, launching the personal submarine era with a submersible that's reportedly so easy to pilot that it's likely to create a new niche in the tourism and rental market."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Slashdot comments indicative of the problem (Score 1) 1215

If this were a courtroom, she would be the plaintiff (because she's the one making an accusation of harassment), and thus would be required to provide the supporting documentation that gives her claimed evidence credibility.

No, that's not how it works. In a courtroom, the balance of the evidence is not slanted to any special requirement of "proof", just "preponderance". And a screen shot of harassment is evidence that could be sufficient for a "win".

Unless the defense can cast a reasonable doubt on the veracity of said evidence, which IMO has happened with this case. Somebody created an account just to harass a person whose honesty has come into question before, and they just so happened to do it less than 5 minutes before someone who wasn't logged in and didn't do an actual search somehow found the user page? For me, that's enough to say that the "evidence" presented is not strong enough for a conviction, and would require supplemental exhibits.

OK, so what's your banking access information? What, don't you trust me (and the rest of the Slashdot community)?

Trust all the time isn't the same as trust everyone all the time.

When your argument predicates social interaction on generic "trust," that very much is what you're saying.

Do you also trust that the voting machine you use hasn't been tampered with, or is there that nagging little thought in the back of your head that something could have been rigged?

There has never been a voting machine type that hasn't been tampered with, even paper and pen methods. Do "trust until proven otherwise" wouldn't apply, as "proven otherwise" has been met.

OK, so the woman in question has been called out previously for making dubious and outright dishonest statements.

Also, the men who trusted Jeffrey Dahmer died before (or rather, as) he could prove himself otherwise.

  "Don't assume to know a man's heart until you've walked a mile in his shoes."

Obviously, and contrary to what is apparently popular opinion on Slashdot, trust is not a binary decision.

But it is. You either do it or you don't. How do you 37.5% trust your chair to not break when you sit in it? Find a weight exactly 37.5% of your weight and place it on the chair to test it before sitting down?

You realize you just contradicted yourself here, right? If trust is a binary decision, than the statement "Trust all the time isn't the same as trust everyone all the time." would be invalid, since it implies degrees of trust rather than a "yes/no" configuration.

Comment: Re:Slashdot comments indicative of the problem (Score 1) 1215

Do you trust me? Why should you?

There are levels of trust,

Well at least you accept that. Now we just have to work out the details.

but you've given me no reason to distrust you on certain things.

Equally, I've given you no reason to trust me. I could be a pathological liar, or I could be incapable of dishonesty. You have no way of knowing for sure. So wouldn't it make more sense to default to the side of caution and assume that I am not particularly trustworthy?

Do you pick up hitch-hikers? Why not, don't you trust them?

Say if you were in Second Life and you IM'd me and said, "Hey can I borrow 100L$ for a few uploads until I can get my payment situation worked out. I'd hand you 100L$.

And if I was a person on the street you'd never met before, and I asked you the same question (but with Dollars, obviously), would you be so readily willing to trust that I'm not going to steal that money?

Or maybe I offered to sell you something on Craigslist, and have you come meet me at a place of my choosing. Would you think it a bad idea to assume that there's a chance I have ill intent? Because people get robbed/murdered in similar scams quite often these days.

Ever played Rust? There's a valid allegory there.

Nope, console gamer, so none of those Zombies meets survival games...yet.

Well, the concept is that you start the game naked with nothing but a rock, and when you get killed you lose all your gear and have to start over. I haven't played either, but apparently the people who do have developed a culture that many are saying is inherently sociopathic - activities like torture, backstabbing, and senseless murder are the norm rather than the outliers.

But...in those games, wouldn't cooperating with others and forming communities together make the group so strong that the zombies wouldn't be a threat?

Yes.

Yet, that's not how the majority of people choose to play. Sure, you'll get your little enclaves of people who are Steam friends or some such, but generally speaking, on a server where no-one knows anyone, it's essentially a murderous free-for-all. To me that says something about human nature... something most people would probably prefer to assume doesn't happen.

Say you walk up to my door with a minor injury...I don't need to hand you my keys, I can say "Hey dude, need me to call someone or do you need a ride?"

Sounds like a good way to get murdered... or raped then murdered, if you're a woman. You may think that's ridiculous, but people gaining unauthorized access by feigning need is far from unheard of.

I would handle that situation by offering to call an ambulance, or at the very least having a buddy help me "stabilize the patient" while I dressed the wound.

Comment: Re:Slashdot comments indicative of the problem (Score 1) 1215

Can't a person just not trust anyone by default without being accused of racism, or misogyny, etc?

You're lucky you're not being accused of being a sociopath.

This time, lol.

Trust is the very center of society and civilization. If you can't trust, you're not going to be very good at getting along in society.

OK, so go ahead and post your banking access information in response, you know, since "Trust is the very center of society and civilization."

Comment: Re:Slashdot comments indicative of the problem (Score 1) 1215

No, we've been over this.

You're really a hypocrite. You don't recall the "calling you a stupid shit on virtue of making stupid arguments" and you being a petulant asshole pretending that was an ad hominem. Then immediately, in the very next post you made, doing the same thing regarding Jeff Bezos.

Yea, because I'm not an obsessive little prick. See, some people have more going on in their lives than what they post on Slashdot, so we tend to not bother remembering unimportant comments we made on unimportant subjects to unimportant people.

That you have double standards of that degree

Coming from you, that's really funny. Enjoy your fantasy world where you're infallible and anyone who disagrees with your holy edicts are just dumb chumps. Me, I've got more important things to do.

Comment: Re:*Dons asbestos suit* (Score 1) 1215

Number one, there's nothing "epic" about my post.

Number two, you apparently parsed it wrong. But I'll cut you some slack, since sarcasm can be hard to infer in text posts.

Number three, upon consideration of the evidence (screenshot) presented, I now find the initial claim dubious, and have since retracted my earlier stance on the matter.

Comment: Re:Slashdot comments indicative of the problem (Score 1) 1215

Isn't it also "genuine sexism" to assume she's not lying?

She's provided evidence of harassment.

No, she's providing a claim of harassment, but as has been pointed out by others, she has also been caught misrepresenting herself in the past, and the details of this new "evidence" appear to take credibility away from her claims, rather than enforce them (namely how, in the screenshot, you can see it was taken by a user not logged in, and that the account in question was created less than 5 minutes before the screenshot was taken).

If this were a courtroom, she would be the plaintiff (because she's the one making an accusation of harassment), and thus would be required to provide the supporting documentation that gives her claimed evidence credibility.

Those accusing her of lying haven't provided proof of lying.

They don't have to - burden of proof goes to the accuser, and as mentioned earlier, she is the one who is actually making an accusation here.

The win goes to the side with evidence, even if weak.

I prefer a system where the evidence is thoroughly investigated, especially if it's weak, rather than just defaulting judgement to whoever makes the most convincing case but can't actually prove their claims.

Personally, I don't trust her, not because she's a woman or anything stupid like that, but rather because I don't trust anyone I don't personally know.

If that were true, then you'd never leave your house.

Why do people assume complete trust is required for social interaction?

Assuming everyone is a violent murderer until you "know" them would be debilitating,

Yes, it would be.

and that's the natural consequence of your assertion.

No, it's not.

I trust all the time.

OK, so what's your banking access information? What, don't you trust me (and the rest of the Slashdot community)?

I trust the guy in traffic to not deliberately ram me.

Do you really? You assume he's not going to, because he's not driving like that's his intention. But say the guy in traffic is driving erratically, swerving between lanes, and being belligerent. Do you trust him to not do anything that could damage your vehicle and/or harm you?

Or do you temper your trust based on the circumstances at hand?

I trust the ATM to not give me $100 and deduct $1000 from my account.

Do you also trust that the voting machine you use hasn't been tampered with, or is there that nagging little thought in the back of your head that something could have been rigged?

I trust the store to sell me the item labeled, and not poison in a peanut butter jar.

Bad idea.

Obviously, and contrary to what is apparently popular opinion on Slashdot, trust is not a binary decision.

The economy depends about as much on economists as the weather does on weather forecasters. -- Jean-Paul Kauffmann

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