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Ask Slashdot: What Would You Do With Half a Rack of Server Space? 208

Posted by timothy
from the give-it-a-piece-of-my-mind dept.
New submitter Christian Gainsbrugh (3766717) writes I work at a company that is currently transitioning all our servers into the cloud. In the interim we have half a rack of server space in a great datacenter that will soon be sitting completely idle for the next few months until our lease runs out. Right now the space is occupied by around 8 HP g series servers, a watchguard xtm firewall, Cisco switch and some various other equipment. All in all there are probably around 20 or so physical XEON processors, and probably close to 10 tb of storage among all the machines. We have a dedicated 10 mbs connection that is burstable to 100mbs.

I'm curious what Slashdot readers would do if they were in a similar situation. Is there anything productive that could be done with these resources? Obviously something revenue generating is great, but even if there is something novel that could be done with these servers we would be interested in putting them to good use.

Comment: Re:Hallo Windows man (Score 4, Insightful) 201

by CambodiaSam (#45481929) Attached to: Microsoft Customers Hit With New Wave of Fake Tech Support Calls
I've received two calls from these scammers... and the example you provided is not far from the truth. When they claim to call from "The Windows" as the company name, it's painfully obvious what they are up to for about 99% of the computer using population. The problem is that 1%. They probably get a hit every once in a while that makes it profitable enough.
Iphone

Apple Unveils iPhone 5C, iPhone 5S 773

Posted by Soulskill
from the only-24-letters-left-to-choose-from dept.
Nerval's Lobster writes "Apple unveiled the iPhone 5C and iPhone 5S today, which will replace the company's current iPhone 5. Apple CEO Tim Cook and other executives took to a stage in California to introduce both devices. The cheaper iPhone 5C features a plastic casing available in a variety of colors (green, blue, reddish-pink, yellow, white); Apple seems to have done its best to make the device look high quality, with the backing and sides molded of a single piece of plastic; on the hardware side of things, the iPhone 5C comes with a 4-inch Retina display, A6 processor, and 8-megapixel camera. The other new Apple design, the iPhone 5S, is the company's next-generation 'hero' device. While the iPhone 5 was a radical new design, the 5S is an iterative upgrade; on the outside, it looks pretty much the same as its predecessor (the new iPhone features a new color, gold, in addition to the 'traditional' black or white aluminum body). The iPhone 5S has an A7 chip built on 64-bit architecture (capable of running 32-bit and 64-bit apps), which is pretty speedy, to put it mildly. There's also the M7 'motion co-processor' which boosts the actions of the accelerometer, compass, and gyroscope—in theory, opening the door to more refined motion-related apps, such as ones devoted to exercise." The iPhone 5S also has a sensor built into the home button that will allow you to unlock the device with your fingerprint. Both new phone will be available for purchase on Friday, Sept. 20th. Apple announced that iOS 7 will be rolling out on Wednesday, Sept. 18th.

Comment: Games requiring a server that has been shut down? (Score 1) 572

by CambodiaSam (#43367937) Attached to: Microsoft Creative Director 'Doesn't Get' Always-On DRM Concerns
Is there a list of single player games that required some type of server connection but has been shut down since introduction? The closest thing I can find is this:

http://mmohuts.com/editorials/mmo-graveyard

It's not a perfect analogy since MMOs have a reasonable need for a connection to the server, unlike single player. It would be nice to reference whenever someone argues for always-on DRM.

Comment: Local Equipment, Usable Skills (Score 2) 172

by CambodiaSam (#43271591) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Setting Up a Computer Lab In a Developing Country
I've been setting up and teaching computer skills part-time in northwestern Cambodia for about 8 years now.

Getting equipment to a remote location is an expensive and perilous task. Damage, theft, bribes, delays, fees, more bribes, and unforeseen problems will cause you more headaches than you can imagine. I buy my equipment locally from a seller I have built up a relationship with. Because I'm a repeat customer, he goes out of his way to make sure the computers keep running when I'm not there, which is most of the year.

Because Cambodia is one of the poorest countries in the world, the idea of spending $300 on a copy of Microsoft Office is unthinkable. That's enough to run a small household for a couple months. You can install open source alternatives if you like, but it might not be a necessity since the machines are chock full of apps.

Getting the lab running is frankly the easy part. Your lesson plan needs to take precedence. Teach skills that are commercially viable in the country, inspire them to learn more, and give a solid foundation of basic skills. I have former students that can directly tie their lessons to helping them find jobs later on. They then take these skills and teach others, which creates a virtuous cycle. Good luck!

Comment: Stealing Electricity (Score 4, Insightful) 884

by CambodiaSam (#42959259) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Dealing With an Advanced Wi-Fi Leech?
If someone had an extension cord plugged into my outside outlet and it ran to their house to steal power, I would walk over, knock on the door, and ask them to stop it. And yes, I would also unplug it.

If you have the means to determine where they are it's worth asking them to stop. That alone might change their attitude toward poking at networks.

Man is the best computer we can put aboard a spacecraft ... and the only one that can be mass produced with unskilled labor. -- Wernher von Braun

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