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Comment: Re:Got it backwards? (Score 5, Informative) 130

by Sneftel (#48590819) Attached to: No More Foamy Beer, Thanks To Magnets

A higher level of hop oil (or pretty much any vegetable oil, really) will indeed reduce foaming. But that is primarily of academic concern, because you simply *can't* play with the hop levels without affecting the flavor. A brewer will perfect the taste, aroma, color, texture, etc. of a beer before they even start thinking about practical concerns such as blow-off. Which is fine, because as I said, there are already solutions (pun intended) for blow-off, which don't involve reformulating your recipe.

A brewer who saw excess foaming in his dubbel, and added hop oil to try to combat it, would find that he was no longer making a dubbel.

Comment: Re:Head (Score 1, Informative) 130

by Sneftel (#48590485) Attached to: No More Foamy Beer, Thanks To Magnets

The carbon dioxide produced by fermentative carbonation is chemically identical to that involved in forced carbonation. I agree that cask ale tastes better, but that has nothing to do with where the CO2 is from. Purely looking at the gases part of the equation, it has much more to do with the *level* of carbonation, and the oxygenation provided by sparkler nozzles.

Comment: Re:Got it backwards? (Score 3, Insightful) 130

by Sneftel (#48590475) Attached to: No More Foamy Beer, Thanks To Magnets

Exactly. Brewers *already* have anti-foaming measures at their disposal. The most well-known is Fermcap, a silicone-based solution which reduces surface tension. The use of hops -- in extract form or otherwise -- has nothing to do with reducing foaming, and everything to do with flavor, aroma, and preservation.

Comment: Re:Workaround (Score 1) 269

by Sneftel (#48575935) Attached to: Keurig 2.0 Genuine K-Cup Spoofing Vulnerability

The "way we used to do it when men were men" was to roast one serving worth of beans in a skillet, grind them with a mortar and pestle, steep the grounds in water, and then strain the coffee through muslin or cheesecloth. Also you have to heat the water over a wood-burning stove. Anything less means I get to look down on you.

Comment: Re:I'll never be employed (Score 2) 139

by Sneftel (#48502037) Attached to: Want To Work For a Cool Tech Company? Hone Your Social Skills

...having people skills, being outgoing, and NOT being afraid to stand up in front of even a small group to give a presentation has carried me further than many people I knew starting out, and knew the tech far more than I did or still do.

That's a key point. I've known a lot of hugely gifted yet socially inept coders, who took their fear of personal interactions and reinterpreted it as disdain for the hoi polloi, and decided that the skills within their comfort zone were all they ever needed. And their employers saw them coming a mile away, and let them carve out their tiny moated kingdoms, for crap wages and zero upward mobility. The "genius nerd in his nerd cave" career track is a comfortable one. But it is so limiting.

Comment: General applicability (Score 3, Insightful) 139

by Sneftel (#48501897) Attached to: Want To Work For a Cool Tech Company? Hone Your Social Skills

Want to work in a decent, non-dead-end job, with the opportunity to advance your career and make a meaningful difference to the world? Learn to interact with people. Learn empathy, learn communications skills, learn to temper your urge towards condescension and dismissal. If you're a coder, it's 50% of your job, assuming you're doing your job right.

Always draw your curves, then plot your reading.

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