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Comment Re:How much is it C++ and how much the compilers? (Score 1) 757

I argue the exact opposite! C++ the programming language leaves way too many decisions to the compiler implementer. A better specified language, such as Java, Ada, Eiffel, etc, doesn't have that problem of different compiler interpretations of the standard.

Interpretations of the standard? C++ standard has few ambiguities, hard to come with many interpretations. Perhaps you mean the bits that are left as implementation-dependent? I think grandparent was talking about dumb programmers who argue about precise results of undefined behaviour.

Comment Re:Git can handle large repositories. (Score 1) 245

I would like to offer a radically different experience. I use a git repository for synching *all* my work-related files (binary or not) across four machines, one of them located abroad. Two of those repository copies are on a VirtualBox filesystem, accessed from a virtualized PC, and for one of these the .vdi file resides on a SATA HDD drive mounted over USB2, so rather low-end performance. The repository is currently at 74 GB (yes, GB), and I am entirely satisfied with git's performance when it comes to adding, merging, checking out, and so on. Only the initial git add/commit/push cycle that sent the first 50 GB abroad was a bit cumbersome (took overnight). Admittedly, this is only a huge master branch and a temporary 'scratch' branch that I switch to when pushing files between the repos, but still, I expect to hit 100 GB in a year or two and no complaints.

Comment Re:10^5 slower? (Score 1) 100

I hate when people say that something is "3 times slower," as if that means anything. I know what they are trying to say, but the correct way to express it is "one-third the speed," or "one-third as fast."

Just imagine "slowness", measured in s/m, is the reciprocal of "speed". Three times slower means its slowness is three times bigger compared to the reference, thus it's 1/3 of its speed. Worth making a fuss of?

Programmers used to batch environments may find it hard to live without giant listings; we would find it hard to use them. -- D.M. Ritchie