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Comment: Re:It's job security (Score 2) 826

by CRC'99 (#47752427) Attached to: Choose Your Side On the Linux Divide

It boils down to the old adage: "If it ain't broke, don't fix it."

This is exactly right. I was playing with the last lot of RHEL7 betas - the biggest issue I had was that ethernet adapters would randomly fail to start - and systemd would not give any details as to why. Each time I had to log in over a serial console, stop networking, disable the profile, enable the profile again, and start networking. This would work perfectly - until a random time when rebooting later on (and not every reboot) where networking wouldn't come up again.

This is not what admins need - randomly failing network connections. This is also a problem that was fixed decades ago - until systemd causes it again.

Lets ignore the problems with new aims to recreate consoles etc in systemd / userland and ignore / disable the kernel ones. Because that's a great idea *cough*

Comment: Re:Just a WM (Score 1) 611

by CRC'99 (#47141459) Attached to: Which desktop environment do you like the best?

+10 insightful.

I'd like to add my FUCK YOU to the Gnome project too :)

+1 here too.

I tried out the RHEL7 RC the other day and was very disappointed to see Gnome3 being the default desktop. No XFCE, only Gnome 3 or KDE. A bit of a shame. Means I won't be using RHEL7 on any desktops like I was hoping. At least the GUI selection won't matter for console only installs - which is the majority of my EL installations...

Right now, I'm using XFCE on Fedora 20 - and its not perfect, but does what I need. Getting Bluetooth back would be handy (blueman only works with bluez4, Fedora has bluez5).

Comment: Re:Lat / Long? (Score 1) 461

by CRC'99 (#46461535) Attached to: The $100,000 Device That Could Have Solved Missing Plane Mystery

I can see how a constant stream of telemetry might be cost-prohibitive, but what about a squirt of data consisting of -
  - Flight Number
- Lat / Long
- Airspeed
- Groundspeed
- Altitude
- Compass heeding ...sent every five minutes? At least that would give a 'last known' location.

Congratulations - You've just described ADS-B [1] - however its MUCH more often than every 5 minutes - and more airliners already have it. In fact, look at the tracking info from flightradar24.com for the flight in question [2] - then it disappeared... Having yet another bit of tech to combat this is stupid.

[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A... - Bonus: How it works - http://www.airservicesaustrali...
[2] http://theaviationist.com/wp-c...

Comment: Re:too late, Microsoft (Score 1) 172

I moved to KDE on Debian and haven't looked back.

You are hemorrhaging users to phones, tablets, OSX, gamers to game consoles, power users to Linux.... pretty much everything that isn't Windows. We told you people were only using Windows because there was no choice, but you failed to listen and use the chance to improve your technology. Now, it's too late. There are other choices, and people are moving to them. To quote B5:

"The avalanche has begun. It is too late for the pebbles to vote."

In a way, I agree - but I can't say that I like KDE or Gnome 3. I ended up settling on XFCE using Fedora 20. It boots fast, everything works as it should (except a PCI DVB card - but I already had a spare USB one that works fine).

Thunderbird for email, Chrome for web browsing, terminal, Steam for my TF2 fix, and it all 'just works' - especially now the open source radeon driver does dynamic power management correctly.

I'm just in the middle of purchasing a new laptop - and the first thing that will happen is it be formatted and Fedora 20 get installed. I've also moved away from Google for contacts / calendar sync and now using OwnCloud (private stuff ftw!), and Dropbox is also replaced by OwnCloud. I'm finally getting to have a say in my OS and data security!

Comment: Re: There'll be a killer app. (Score 1) 254

by CRC'99 (#45914379) Attached to: I think wearable computing will take off...

Seeing and recording are two different things. If you don't understand the difference, you're a moron. Actually, given all the cameras and phones and shit, I think I'm going to have to start wearing a mask anyway...

Diary / Calendar entry:
Meeting at 1300 today with Anon Coward.

Look at that, its recorded. If its in my phones calendar its even a digital recording of it. Better really get your mask on... But wait, wouldn't I still know it was you if I talked to you?

Comment: Re:This is more about Oracle Linux (Score 1) 186

by CRC'99 (#45903849) Attached to: Red Hat To Help Develop CentOS

I don't think anyone really cares about binary compatibility.

Apart from anyone wanting to run software certified for RHEL, you mean?

This is where it gets silly.... You worry about the certification for other software, but not the base OS? If the certification is important, then it would be BETTER to use the proper RHEL and not a free 'knockoff'....

Comment: Re:This is more about Oracle Linux (Score 1) 186

by CRC'99 (#45896043) Attached to: Red Hat To Help Develop CentOS

What killed the release of CentOS 6 in a timely manner was all the build dependencies. To get an exact binary-compatible RPM for foo.el6 you needed to build it on, say, Fedora 13, with libbar-verisonX.Y.Z.fc13 installed. It wasn't self-hosting or documented how to build el6. Scientific Linux came out much more quickly because they didn't care about binary compatibility.

I don't think anyone really cares about binary compatibility. I cannot think of a single operational advantage that this gives - apart from "narf, the checksums match what I could have paid for". The massive migration away from CentOS in version 6 proved this.

Comment: Re:If it means faster CentOS development, good (Score 0) 186

by CRC'99 (#45896019) Attached to: Red Hat To Help Develop CentOS

2) CentOS being a closed development group that refuses to accept any help from outsiders. Scientific Linux is another clone of Redhat that was able release their version of Redhat 6 much faster.

Correct - and the team at Scientific Linux are awesome to work with. It is a breath of fresh air from the poison that is the CentOS 'community'.

Comment: Re:hire me (Score 5, Insightful) 289

by CRC'99 (#45221725) Attached to: The Cybersecurity Industry Is Hiring, But Young People Aren't Interested

The employees are out there but they cannot work for chinese slave labor wages, nor do they want that lifestyle.

11 months ago I finished my Commercial Pilots License - I haven't been able to find any work at all since completing it. That was the last time I touched a plane.

The same problem exists. People are expected to splash $100k AUD on their license, then work for ~$25k a year. Not to mention get themselves to jobs on their own dime etc... I hear the same lines "There is a massive pilots shortage!!" - which is absolute bullshit. We just have to take other jobs to pay off the loans etc we took for our training.

It just about gutted my career - but this is the world we live in. Now I'm only casually employed - and making about the same amount as I would as a pilot - while working only a handful of hours.

Comment: Re:Network fabric != shell scripts (Score 1) 192

by CRC'99 (#45188535) Attached to: Your Next Network Operating System Is Linux

The way to get the most performance out of iptables is to make each chain as small as possible.

Thats sorta the problem. Even lowend Cisco devices will handle quite lengthy ACL tables without any performance degredation.

No, No they don't. If you look at the packet-per-second performance you get when you put even some basic rules in there, you'll be surprised. Some systems have their PPS rate halved by this...

All life evolves by the differential survival of replicating entities. -- Dawkins

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