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Comment: They've tried everything else.. see details here (Score 1) 248

by CKW (#47254845) Attached to: Canadian Court Orders Google To Remove Websites From Its Global Index

Some nice detailed info over here: http://www.equustek.info/

> In July 2012 Mr. Justice Punnett ordered that the world wide assets of Morgan Jack and Datalink be frozen. The order prohibits Datalink from carrying on business because it prohibits the sale of any inventory.
> ...
> The defendants have effectively disappeared. They have refused to provide any information about where they operate of where they manufacture the GW1000. ... Further, the company appears to be a virtual one.
> ...
> However, Datalink and Morgan Jack continue to sell their products in violation of these and other court orders.

I presume that this website is the seized website of the guy whom the BC court has ordered "all worldwide assets be seized". It looks like the BC court has tried everything underneath the sun to deal with this issue prior to going the google route. But the fact that the other guy has "gone underground" and is likely selling products from foreign jurisdictions ... I think the plaintiff and the court going the google route is totally fair and justified in this case.

If it wasn't for google and the internet, this guy, wherever he is, wouldn't be able to carry on his illegal fraudulent business.

Comment: Re:cry of a dying business (Score 1) 210

Sounds like Amazon and Netflix and Apple and others need to get together in a joint venture with Google to really go to town with Google Fiber. Imagine if all the big BIG tech vendors threw together, AND did an IPO to get enough funding to actually do it, AND did pre-sign-ups to get average people to scream blue murder to their elected representatives demanding that the TechFiber Alliance be given the same statutory access to run and bury fiber cables across people's streets and yards like the cable co's were given 50 years ago.

Comment: Re:Build another server (Score 1) 983

by CKW (#46465387) Attached to: How Do You Backup 20TB of Data?

> rsync hourly.

Noooo no no no no. That's a good way of rsync'ing an empty mount point to your target and wiping all your backup data automatically.

If you want to rsync frequently, make sure you are using --link-dest or something to multiple targets. Thus the day that you have a main array failure and you also discover that last week's rsync was "empty", you've only lost a differential and the prior month's copy is still there.

Comment: Re:Crashplan (Score 1) 983

by CKW (#46464843) Attached to: How Do You Backup 20TB of Data?

I don't know what page you are looking at, but to use their cloud storage it's $4 to $9 a month (individual/family). Their "free" offering clearly says "backup to other computers and external drives, free" -- maybe they give you a demo period of cloud storage, but clearly the free is not cloud based.

Comment: Re:Thoughts (Score 2, Insightful) 142

by CKW (#46449531) Attached to: China Deploys Satellites In Search For Missing Malaysia Airlines Flight

I was thinking about this yesterday. Doesn't the vast majority of modern aviation tracking radar systems depend pretty heavily, not just for identification but for returns at all at at long distances, on the planes own IFFtransponders for replies?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S...

Could it not "drop off" the long range radar simply by turning off it's transponder? At that distance the radar return might be low enough that without the transponder response, it'd "disappear"...

Comment: Re:Yes they did. (Score 1) 572

by CKW (#46422379) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Does Your Employer Perform HTTPS MITM Attacks On Employees?

I wanna be a fly on the wall the day (and it will happen) when a large number of people's bank accounts are drained, and the banks say "it was you, you logged in with your credentials"... then latter on the people hit and/or the banks finally figure out "oh, it was all these employees of company X whose accounts got drained" ... THEN who is up sh*t creek?

Comment: browsers part of the problem (Score 1) 164

by CKW (#46359661) Attached to: ICANN Considers Using '127.0.53.53' To Tackle DNS Namespace Collisions

I have a big enough problem with my stupid browser deciding that when I type "blahblah" into the host bar that if it can't reach "http://blahblah:80/" that it should automatically default to "http://blahblah.com/" or google "blahblah" ... yeah, that's what I need, the internal hostnames leaked to google, thanks idiot browser developer.

Okay, it's good for grandma and everyone else using browsers. There should be a clear UI element that appears when this happens to allow me to disable it.

Comment: Re:and next time, (Score 2) 62

by CKW (#46359609) Attached to: The Phone Dragnet That Caught the World's Top Drug Lord

They still need to store that massive list of crucial phone numbers somewhere, and also increase communication via other means in order to propogate the phone number changes.

The only thing burner phones is good for is not allowing the cops to easily pull your number from phone company records by name so as to put a trace on your phone.

Instead they have do do actual legwork to figure out what phone you're calling from, and depending on which opponents you are facing and whether they have "high priority" FBI/FSB van-full-of-technology-on-your-ass nearby watching the call metadata from ALL the calls to nearby towers...

Burner phones are also good for people whom the police do not know about nor whom they can physically find ... but that quickly breaks down as they hunt you down from the calls you make to numbers and people they do know about.

Comment: Re:Long Term Con? (Score 1) 695

by CKW (#46337029) Attached to: Mt. Gox Gone? Apparent Theft Shakes Bitcoin World

Shadowy japanese developer develops virtual currency.

Years latter japanese "virtual bank" dissolves with a third of a billion dollars missing.

Oh really?

The absolute best comparison would be that Eve Online bank whose founder closed shop and walked away with the ISK, or the Eve Online corporation whose director transferred all the assets and then dissolved it and walked away. Just the knowledge of those alone was enough to predict that this was inevetable with Bitcoin. I just cannot believe so many people were dumb enough to hand their virtual stuff lock stock and key to a virtual company.

If the "company" had been in Nigeria maybe they would have taken pause. But for some reason they think that "oh Japan, that's a modern country with some laws, obviously my untraceable currency will be safe with a company founded by some random nobody".

Comment: Govt positions sound like "Freemen on the Land" (Score 1) 572

> It will take years, if not decades, for us to return to the position that we had prior to his disclosures

ALL THE REST OF US believe that "the position" they "held" is and/or should be flat out ***king illegal. We think the morons passing laws that mangae to circumvent and directly violate key attributes of our democracies - are the traitors. It's getting damn close to the time when a "citizen's rights" shouldn't be bound by borders, and a governments "limitations on powers" shouldn't end at the borders nor be different outside the borders.

"Oh look, I'm outside of X, obviously no laws at all apply to me, fuck you and you and you."

Actually, that sounds exactly like the governmental state equivalent of "Freemen on the Land"!

Comment: Re:Stay behind the line! (Score 1) 388

by CKW (#45345507) Attached to: Anonymous Clashes With D.C. Police During Million Mask March

Always remember boys and girls, if you've ever been arrested for anything (not convicted, just arrested) - it's very possible that you won't ever in your life be admitted to Canada as a visitor or tourist. And that may someday extend to the rest of the entire world as well.

Same goes in reverse for Canadians who might ever wish to see some of the spectacular natural parks and things in the US.

Comment: Re:Canadians: Complain to the Privacy Comissioner (Score 1) 127

by CKW (#45206603) Attached to: Bell Canada To Collect User Data For Advertising

Doesn't that blatantly violate the copyright of the websites who are serving that data?

Doesn't doubleclick have enough lawyers to blow Bell back to the stone age?

I specifically remember years ago, when someone tried to build a CLIENT SIDE application that allowed you and others to "comment on top of" a website as it was displayed in your browser, they got completely blown out of the water over this, because they were "defacing and modifying someone else's copyright'd content" -- and that wasn't even as clear as this, that was in your browser after it had been displayed, this is flat out interception of communication between me and a third party and MODIFICATION of said data.

It's just completely fucked up. Everyone needs to enable SSL on their websites, cpu and bandwidth be damned.

Comment: linked-in "architecture" (Score 1) 78

by CKW (#44992613) Attached to: LinkedIn Agrees To Block Stalkers

Two separate times over a couple years I have gone into my linked-in profile and de-selected ALL the "email you this" and "email you that" options.

I kept getting email notifications for large numbers of things. (Yes, I waited 7+ days after each profile change.)

TWICE I've gone to their technical support staff. TWICE they've failed to figure out how to configure their systems to not send me e-mail notifications. The second time they flat out apologized for not being able to do it successfully, they were able to recognize that however their back end is configured and architected ... it's just impossible to do certain things.

Yeah, no, I'm not trusting private data to them.

Stellar rays prove fibbing never pays. Embezzlement is another matter.

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