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Submission Summary: 0 pending, 6 declined, 0 accepted (6 total, 0.00% accepted)

Censorship

+ - Digital content in conservative countries

Submitted by
Builder
Builder writes "I'm going to be travelling in some interesting parts of Africa for the next 6 months (Niger, CAR, Gabon, etc.) Having read some of the 'What gadgets to take on my travels?' Ask Slashdot stories, I believe that a number of readers are very familiar with wandering around the world, so I'm throwing myself on your not so tender mercies and asking for the wisdom of your miles.

I'm ok with the 'what to take' bit, and I've limited the technology down to just what I need to do my job. I'm not carrying any creature comfort devices and I've minimised what I need for work. But I am taking a laptop. I need it to do my job, so I figure I may as well get some personal use out of it too.

So here comes my question... Some of the countries I'm visiting have large Muslim populations and are not entirely secular. Should I avoid taking ripped copies of some of my DVDs and TV shows with me? While acceptable for most western TV stations to show, I'm concerned that some shows might be suitably offensive to my host country and I could find myself in a difficult position. I'm not talking about anything particularly controversial, only stuff that has aired on UK television during prime time viewing.

There's not a lot of clarity to be found on Google about taking digital content for personal use into these countries, but with some stricter countries banning Christian bibles and so on, I'd rather seek advice.

I can't just setup a Truecopy partition because I'm using OS X, and Apple's home directory encryption doesn't give me plausible deniability in any form."
Censorship

+ - Digital content in conservative countries

Submitted by
Builder
Builder writes "I'm going to be travelling in some interesting parts of Africa for the next 6 months (Niger, CAR, Gabon, etc.) Having read some of the 'What gadgets to take on my travels?' Ask Slashdot stories, I believe that a number of readers are very familiar with wandering around the world, so I'm throwing myself on your not so tender mercies and asking for the wisdom of your miles.

I'm ok with the 'what to take' bit, and I've limited the technology down to just what I need to do my job. I'm not carrying any creature comfort devices and I've minimised what I need for work. But I am taking a laptop. I need it to do my job, so I figure I may as well get some personal use out of it too.

So here comes my question... Some of the countries I'm visiting have large Muslim populations and are not entirely secular. Should I avoid taking ripped copies of some of my DVDs and TV shows with me? The content I'm worried about includes things like the Soprano's TV show (and please, don't post spoilers here — the final series hasn't aired in the UK yet! :)), Die Hard movies, etc. While acceptable for most western TV stations to show, I'm concerned that some of the nudity or language in these shows might be suitably offensive to my host country and I could find myself in a difficult position.

There's not a lot of clarity to be found on Google about taking digital content for personal use into these countries, but with some stricter countries banning Christian bibles and so on, I'd rather seek advice.

I can't just setup a Truecopy partition because I'm using OS X, and Apple's home directory encryption doesn't give me plausible deniability in any form."
Patents

+ - Halliburton loses software patent appeal in UK

Submitted by
Builder
Builder writes "The Register are reporting that Halliburton have lost a patent appeal in the UK.

What makes this interesting are the appeal judge's reasons for rejecting the patent.
"The English court took a rigorous approach to analysing the patents and found that it did not adequately describe the system it sought to patent. In order to be valid a patent must describe a process so completely that a person who knows that subject area must be able to replicate it using only the contents of the patent."

He went on to say that the patent was missing vital details, contained wrong equations, demanded a higher level of expertise than allowed and that it relied on material external to the patent, and therefore was not a valid patent. Sadly this patent was upheld in the USA, but is this a good way to fight patents in the future ?"

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