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Submission + - Radio Controlled Car Runs on Soda Can Rings (

polyp2000 writes: A pair of Spanish engineers have recently unveiled the dAlH2Orean (see what they did there?), a R/C car that runs on aluminum. Dropping a few soda can tabs into a tank of sodium hydroxide produces enough hydrogen to power the little speedster for 40 minutes – at almost 20mph.

Submission + - Tap tech brings touch to dumb phones (

nk497 writes: A Cambridge-based firm has come up with a way to bring touch interfaces to phones without touchscreens. According to TouchDevice, the system uses the microphone to turn any surface on a handset into a touch-sensitive input panel by analysing sound signatures. “For example, where icons are displayed on a non-touch screen display, you could tap on there and it would activate the application,” said founder Mike Bradley. TouchDevice believes there are two markets for the technology: firstly to augment input potential in touchcreen smartphones, and secondly as a way of adding touch to “dumb” displays. The system should be making its way into devices by early next year.

Submission + - Google starts charging Chrome Extension developers ( 2

trooperer writes: Yesterday, Google introduced two significant changes in the Google Chrome Extensions Gallery: a developer signup fee and a domain verification system.

The signup fee is a one-time payment of $5. Supposedly, it's purpose is to "create better safeguards against fraudulent extensions in the gallery and limit the activity of malicious developer accounts". Developers who already registered with the gallery can continue to update their extensions and publish new items without paying the fee.

Submission + - What I Learned From Being a Reality TV Character - (

MicroBerto writes: One year ago, I was thrown into a reality TV pilot titled Crash Test, which aired on Spike TV on April 27th, 2010. On Crash Test, we used top-notch stuntmen and stuntwomen to recreate accidents and crime scenes to see who was really guilty or innocent.

I was the “biomedical scientist” of the bunch, and took measurements to determine if the real-life accidents would have really occurred in our simulations had we not been using professional stuntmen and women. Here is what I learned from being the geek on the set of a Reality TV show.


Submission + - Controversy Arises Over Taliban Option in MoH (

eldavojohn writes: CVG is covering the controversy surrounding the players ability to play as a member of the Taliban in EA's Medal of Honor multiplayer. Fox News hopped on the wagon interviewing a Gold Star mom whose son died in Iraq. She said, "My son didn't get to start over when he was killed. His life was over and I had to deal with that every day. There's 1200 families from Afghanistan that have to live with this every day. And we live it — it's not a game ... EA is very cavalier about it: 'Well, it's just a game.' But it isn't a game to the people who are suffering from the loss of the children and loved ones." EA's response to this criticism of giving players the objective to 'gun down American troops' was this: 'Medal Of Honor is set in today's war, putting players in the boots of today's soldier ... We give gamers the opportunity to play both sides. Most of us have been doing this since we were seven. If someone's the cop, someone's got to be the robber, someone's got to be the pirate, somebody's got to be the alien. In Medal Of Honor multiplayer, someone has to be the Taliban.' Of course the story recalls Six Days in Fallujah which was dropped by Konami following similar controversy. It's clear at least a few people take issue with games surrounding modern conflicts.

Submission + - Sun's 'quiet period' explained (

Arvisp writes: Solar physicists may have discovered why the Sun recently experienced a prolonged period of weak activity.
The most recent so-called "solar minimum" occurred in December 2008.
Its drawn-out nature extended the total length of the last solar cycle — the repeating cycle of the Sun's activity — to 12.6 years, making it the longest in almost 200 years. The new research suggests that the longer-than-expected period of weak activity may have been linked to changes in the way a hot soup of charged particles called plasma circulated in the Sun.

Machines take me by surprise with great frequency. - Alan Turing