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Comment: Re:omg, a store will know where I am (Score 1) 57

by BronsCon (#48672853) Attached to: How Target's Mobile App Uses Location Tech To Track You
It works for everything. It's greatly reduced the number of regrettable purchases (there are still products that look good in the store but turn out to be complete garbage) and completely eliminated regrettable impulse purchases.

You have to be willing to hold yourself to the PO system, though; you won't know until you try.

Comment: Re:omg, a store will know where I am (Score 1) 57

by BronsCon (#48672731) Attached to: How Target's Mobile App Uses Location Tech To Track You
I was going to fully agree with your comment, until I read this gem:

better they track me so they put stuff i buy up front rather than me having to walk through the whole store

You think they'll bring the products you want to the front of the store just because they see that you buy them a lot? That's naively cute. It's also dead wrong.

They want you to walk through the whole store. That's how they convince you to spend more. The 2 items you're there for are almost guaranteed to be at the back of the store, on opposite sides, once they start tracking you, for that very reason. Enjoy.

Of course, they do the same thing now based entirely on sales records. This will just make it more efficient by allowing them to determine where mot people travel before finding what they're looking for, so they can optimize placement of high-margin impulse buys for customers who aren't walking the entire store.

I'm fine with this, anyway, as I've started running my household budget the same way I run my business budget: a PO for every purchase. For household, I do attach a discretionary budget to each PO, so if I see some new product I want to try, I can, but I can't fill my cart with every piece of crap they line the aisles with. The only exception to this is entertainment; if I'm actually setting out to blow money on shit I don't need, trust me when I say I know how to do that.

It hasn't killed the fun of shopping, either; I still shop. A lot. I just don't buy unless I've filled out a household PO, which actually makes the shopping trip more enjoyable, as I don't have to think about budget or if I have room in the car for whatever I'm looking at; it simply doesn't matter, it's not coming home with me today, anyway. If I absolutely must have it right now, I can always talk to my wife and we can agree on a provisional PO for that item. That works both ways, too, and has stopped her from coming home with several-hundred dollar purses on a whim (while giving me a list of awesome gift ideas); and she knows all she really has to do is come home, fill out a PO, and go buy it, so if she really wanted it that badly, she would.

Try it. You might get into it.

Comment: Re:yea no (Score 1) 57

by BronsCon (#48672677) Attached to: How Target's Mobile App Uses Location Tech To Track You
They're not what they were 14 years ago when I worked there, either. They were starting their decline around that time and I'm surprised they've lasted this long, honestly. Sad, I loved the place as a kid, which is why it was one of my first jobs as an adult (my first was within walking distance until I could afford a car).

Comment: Re:No big red button? (Score 1) 212

by BronsCon (#48657613) Attached to: Cyberattack On German Steel Factory Causes 'Massive Damage'
Interesting info. I've only encountered production automotive and small marine engines, which explains why I've never seen it. Looks like someone decided it would be a good idea to add yet another somewhat fragile hydraulic system to our vehicles while, at the same time, removing a safety feature (physical timing restrictions) and sought out to develop this after all.

It'll be interesting, when these hit the market, to see how they fare in terms of longevity. I'm sure they perform great, but what good is that if you have to rebuild it every few thousand miles?

Comment: Re:No big red button? (Score 1) 212

by BronsCon (#48647867) Attached to: Cyberattack On German Steel Factory Causes 'Massive Damage'
Do you know at all how VVT works? There are 2 distinct types of VVT systems I have encountered and both use cam rods. One has different sets of lobes (the most I've seen is 3) for discreet, still hardware-limited, valve timing, while the other uses an adjustable gear at the end of the camshaft, allowing maybe 15-20 degrees of adjustment in total; still hardware-limited. The VVT systems I've seen have all been configured such that the earliest and latest physically possible timings were still well within safe operating parameters.

Did you think the valves were individually operated by servos? Pull your valve cover and take a look sometime; it's at most a dozen bolts, most likely all 10mm.

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