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Comment: Re:The Religious Right will have your head on a pl (Score 3, Insightful) 470

by Brian_Ellenberger (#46669065) Attached to: It's Time To Bring Pseudoscience Into the Science Classroom

You can't teach critical thinking in schools. The Texas state Republican party platform is explicitly opposed to it.

--
I piss off bigots

Your sig is ironic since your opinion is quite bigoted. There is a great deal of pseudoscience belief on both sides of the isle. The left has irrational beliefs on nuclear power, GMO foods, etc. There was an article in the Washington Post about Democrats believing in horoscope and astrology more than Republicans/Independents: http://www.washingtonpost.com/...

Comment: Re: Solution - Face-saving way out (Score 1, Insightful) 482

The entire pro-choice movement is based on the concept of "My Body My Choice". You start forcing people to accept injections of anything into their bodies and you lose the moral basis for that argument. How do you "force" people to accept vaccines? Strap them down and inject them? Could anything be more frightening than the government forcing chemicals into someone's veins? That will make people even more anti-vaccine than ever.

I'm am very pro-vaccine. From childhood illnesses to flu to hpv, I want them all for myself and kids. And I have gotten into arguments with ignorant anti-vaccine people. What I have found is that they simply have lost all faith in "authority" because they have been lied to time and time again. WMD in Iraq! You can keep your insurance! Eat the food pyramid because you need to eat twice as much bread as you do veggies (not kidding, look it up). Leaders lie and lie and lie again to get what they want. Is it any wonder why people don't believe anything. In fact, it seems like the more forceful the denial the more likely the lie. You try and make vaccines mandatory you WILL make a bigger anti-vaccine movement.

Comment: Re: First blacks, (Score 1) 917

by Brian_Ellenberger (#46341367) Attached to: Apple Urges Arizona Governor To Veto Anti-Gay Legislation

Congratulations, your hateful vitriol against people who believe differently than you does more to justify the need for this legislation than any argument supporters could make....

Tolerance comes in both directions. If you can't see the difference between refusing to serve someone based on skin color and refusing to go to and participate in a ceremony that your religion disagrees with, I genuinely feel sorry for your blind hatred.

Comment: IDE for search, refactoring, etc (Score 2) 627

by Brian_Ellenberger (#46328245) Attached to: Does Relying On an IDE Make You a Bad Programmer?

I'm surprised that so many of the comments for IDEs are restricted to things like autocomplete. IDEs do far more than that. Things like smart refactoring (beyond GREP/Replace), code searches and navigation (find references, go up and down the object hierarchy, find impls), and debugging (attach to remote process, breakpoints, etc).

Comment: Re:End of November (Score 1) 250

by Brian_Ellenberger (#45241889) Attached to: Jeffrey Zients Appointed To Fix Healthcare.gov

Not really. It sounds like a position that should have been filled from the beginning is just now getting filled.

The mythical man month does not directly cover the case of being under-manned until a month after release, then bringing staffing up to where it should be. And certainly if that is the entirety of your contribution, I have to assume you mean the most recognized portions of the concept.

Under-manned because they hired one more person? I haven't seen any evidence they were understaffed or under-manned. And someone I'm skeptical that a CEO guy with a BS in Political Science and no Software Engineering background is the key to turning this around.

Comment: Re:It may all be for naught (Score 2) 250

by Brian_Ellenberger (#45241795) Attached to: Jeffrey Zients Appointed To Fix Healthcare.gov

And since they are treated differently than people in the other 14 states that do have exchanges, you can bet an Equal Protection lawsuit will be quick in coming.

Here is the Equal Protection Clause:

All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside. No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.

Note that the boundary of the clause is the State. Different states have different laws all the time. Massachusetts has had statewide healthcare for a long time, and Vermont passed a single-payer healthcare. Oregon has vote-by-mail. Minnesota abolished the death penalty while it remains in the majority of states. Some states have legalized marijuana, while in Pennsylvania you can only buy wine and spirits from state owned shops. Taxes are different, environmental laws are different, etc.

Statehood wouldn't mean much if states weren't allowed to have different laws.

Comment: Missing human "imagination" (Score 4, Insightful) 277

by Brian_Ellenberger (#44597419) Attached to: Why Computers Still Don't Understand People

The thing missing with many of the current AI techniques is they lack human "imagination" or the ability to simulate complex situations in your mind. Understanding goes beyond mere language. Statistical models and second-order logic just can't match a quick simulation. When a person thinks about "Could a crocodile run a steeplechase?" they don't put a bunch of logical statements together. They very quickly picture a crocodile and a steeplechase in a mental simulation based on prior experience. From this picture, a person can quickly visualize what that would look like (very silly). Same with "Should baseball players be allowed to glue small wings onto their caps?". You visualize this, realize how silly it sounds, and dismiss it. People can even run the simulation in their heads as to what would happen (people would laugh, they would be fragile and fall off, etc).

Comment: Re:WTF?!?!?! (Score 1) 251

by Anonym0us Cow Herd (#44052631) Attached to: Microsoft To Start Dumping Surface RT To Schools For $199
Are you talking about the same Mac OS 6 and Mac OS 7 that I remember?

Mac OS 6 was good, as you say. But 'System 7' as they called it, was a huge improvement.

* MultiFinder only (no more single-finder)
* Aliases (eg, file system links to folders or files like symlink)
* Organized subfolders within System Folder to fix the clutter. Seperate subfolders for Startup Items, Desk Accessories, Fonts, etc.
* The Apple Menu folder. You could now customize the Apple menu. What items appeared in the Apple menu was dictated by the Apple Menu folder within the System folder. You could now put more than DA's in the Apple menu. You could put apps there. Or aliases to apps or other folders or frequently opened files. Oh, and nevermind that putting a real folders in the Apple Menu made it into a hierarchical menu. This added tremendous flexibility, customizability and convenience to the Mac.
* Fonts as separate files instead of resources within the System file. No more Font/DA Mover.
* DAs as separate files within the Apple menu. No more Font/DA Mover.
* An invisible temp folder where applications could create active temp files. If the app crashed, these moved into the trash can as recoverable files. The most notable example was Microsoft Word (on Mac). If it crashed, of if the entire system crashed, your unsaved changed file could be found in the trash can and simply dragged out.

I'm sure I'm leaving out some things. But those are the ones I remember best from twenty plus years ago.

System 7 was a gigantic step forward for the classic Mac OS. System 8 and 9 not so much. System 8 had a few improvements, like dockable folders that could appear as tabs at the bottom of the screen. System 9 had no visible improvements. Then by that time classic Mac OS was beginning to stagnate by the late 1990's, Apple was fumbling with their new OS, and it was beginning to be obvious.

Comment: Newsflash: Current flows in the other direction (Score 1) 216

From TFA . . .

One is a positive pole, and the other is used to return the current.

Current flows from the negative pole to the positive pole. It's just an accident of history how the two poles got named. It wasn't discovered until later that the particle (electron) is negative.

Comment: Re:Make metal ilegal too... (Score 1) 551

by Anonym0us Cow Herd (#43811689) Attached to: Australian Police Move To Make 3D Printed Guns Illegal
> If police don't want people to print guns they should just fill Youtube with videos of plastic guns exploding.

That would probably work as effectively as filling YouTube with teenage boys hitting each other in the balls in order to prevent such behavior. Monkey see, monkey do. Hey, cool! That looks like fun!

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