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Comment: So, clarify this for me... (Score 1) 281 281

- If I do a clean install of Windows 10 Preview onto a computer, that will turn into a full license of Windows 10 on July 29, no upgrade from a previous version of Windows is necessary? Or does this only apply if I've installed Windows 10 Preview onto an installation of Windows 7 or 8.1?

(http://blogs.windows.com/bloggingwindows/2015/06/19/upcoming-changes-to-windows-10-insider-preview-builds/ is unclear on this, saying "As long as you are running an Insider Preview build and connected with the MSA you used to register, you will receive the Windows 10 final release builld" but then "It’s important to note that only people running Genuine Windows 7 or Windows 8.1 can upgrade to Windows 10 as part of the free upgrade offer.")

- I only see Windows 10 Preview releases for x86 and x64. How do I get the Pro version instead of the Home version?

I see this as a good way that I can get free up-to-date Windows licenses for old computers I have that are running XP and Vista; all I need is to wipe them and put Windows 10 Preview on them, and link them to my Microsoft account. I just want to make sure that this will work, and I'd like to have the Pro version.

Comment: Should they search the original areas again? (Score 2) 178 178

When the Indian Ocean search began, the first areas searched were the places judged to be where the plane was most likely to have come down. And those areas were searched with a pinger locator. After 30 days, the searchers moved on to other areas and used different equipment to map the sea floor.

What if the plane actually is in one of the first places they looked, though - but because it wasn't pinging, and they weren't scanning the sea floor, they missed it? Should the searchers return to those areas and look on the sea floor, or have they already?

Comment: Why feed the lawyers? (Score 3, Insightful) 268 268

One is a desktop environment. The other is a tablet-based point of sale system. Who's going to confuse the two? "I wanted to install GNOME on my laptop, but instead it's asking me if I want to redeem a coupon."

Is GNOME going to challenge anyone who calls anything a gnome?

Comment: Be bold (Score 1) 384 384

As Wikipedia says, "Be bold." If you see code that needs to be deleted, delete it. Don't just leave it commented out and taking up space.

If you're removing functionality, then make sure you note this clearly in your commit summary, so that it can be found again if that functionality needs to be put back in.

Also, the article talks about rewriting code - throwing out the old and creating it again. This is generally a bad idea, even if you're starting with bad code, because all a rewrite does is exchange a known set of bugs for an unknown set of bugs.

Comment: What you need (Score 1) 683 683

You (and every other development shop) need:

* A coding standards document. Using one from a large open-source project (such as http://framework.zend.com/manual/1.12/en/coding-standard.coding-style.html or http://www.kernel.org/doc/Documentation/CodingStyle) is a good idea. This ensures that you do not have to spend any time being surprised or misled by how a piece of code is formatted.
* Unit tests. They make sure that your code continues to work the same way as you develop it. They also exert pressure to make sure that your units (individual functions to be tested) remain small and concise (or else the unit tests become a bear to write).
* Code reviews. This ensures that more than one person understands how a piece of code was written. It also means that the reviewee learns from your comments and you learn from his code and you both are better programmers for it.

And, most importantly:

* A manager who believes in all of the above and is willing to support and defend it.

If you have all this, then it ceases being a personal "you vs. him" issue, because you can objectively point out (to him, to your team lead, or to your manager) where he's violating the coding standards, where his unit tests are not adequate, or where he is ignoring his code reviews.

The alternative is what it sounds like you have now: cowboy programmers, quickly cranking out code that satisfies a need right now but will take huge amounts of time and money to maintain and extend in the future.

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