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Comment: Re:well.... (Score 1) 474

by Brentyl (#39581493) Attached to: Arizona Attempts To Make Trolling Illegal

All true, and I think you and I agree more than not. However, the MAS program was never shown to be "primarily for pupils of a particular ethnic group." Any kid could take the classes, just as any kid can take African-American studies for example.

Additionally, Tom Horne's opinions in a campaign do not law make - he is not (yet) on the state Supreme Court. He picked a hot button idea and rode it to election. Same with Huppenthal, his successor.

I have never sat in on one of those classes, and (I suspect) nor have you. I don't know their worth, and shutting them down may have been the right call. But TUSD still had a choice - people and agencies take the state to court all the time to determine what is right. Just because he doesn't like the program, and rants and raves to shut it, does NOT mean there is no recourse for the district.

Comment: Re:well.... (Score 5, Informative) 474

by Brentyl (#39573389) Attached to: Arizona Attempts To Make Trolling Illegal

Not to be pedantic: The State of Arizona had little to do with one school district canceling Mexican-American studies. That was a course taught at a few schools in Tucson, and the school district shut it down. There are reasonable arguments both ways on that call.

There was some pressure from the state Dept of Ed, but it was truly a local decision.

That said, as a long-time resident and observer, general knuckleheadedness runs both deep and wide in our fair state. If Brewer signs this bill, I can't imagine it withstanding any appeal. This is basic First Amendment stuff.

Comment: Perspective From a Middle-School Principal (Score 2) 493

by Brentyl (#35516876) Attached to: US Ed Dept Demanding Principals Censor More

In true /. form, I have not RTFA yet. However, I can speak on this currently looks like in the real trenches of middle school. We have no interest in what kids do on the weekends or evenings, and little ability to monitor it. I am busy enough that even if I could scrape 400+ student Facebook pages, I would have no time to do so.

The only exception to this is when an online posting creates on-campus disruption. Then we do indeed act, using existing law. Nothing is allowed to disrupt the learning environment, plain and simple. New law is not needed to address this, in my opinion.

If your cyber life remains in the cyber realm, I don't care. If you disrupt or distract at my school, I'll handle it. It is essentially that simple.

Comment: Re:whatever happened to being careful? (Score 1) 839

by assassinator42 (#30600772) Attached to: Midwest Seeing Red Over 'Green' Traffic Lights

Same here. On some left turn lights, there is a green arrow when you're allowed to turn left, a blinking red where you can turn if there is no oncoming traffic, and a red light when you have to stop. Of course they also have solid green lights that you need to treat as blinking red lights if you're turning left. I still don't like those.

Comment: In other words. (Score 1) 133

by v(*_*)vvvv (#30600694) Attached to: Quantum Encryption Implementation Broken

Even though quantum encryption is theoretically perfect...

Most things that are perfect *are* theoretical.

...real hardware isn't, and they exploit these flaws.

Most modern encryption isn't cracked by breaking the technology used to encrypt it. Security is only as secure as the pain tolerance of the person who knows the PIN, or the size of the visor that is suppose to hide the numbers you press from the person in line behind you.

Comment: Re:lol = laughing out loud? WTF? (Score 5, Funny) 274

by Brentyl (#30600640) Attached to: USPTO Awards LOL Patent To IBM

This patent would have helped a co-worker of mine's uncle: He thought LOL meant "Lots of Love."

Pretty harmless, until he started using it inappropriately: "I'm so sorry to hear of your loss. LOL" or "You're better off without him anyway. LOL".

Apparently, they had to hold an intervention. :)

Comment: Why not add a heating solution? (Score 1) 839

by cheros (#30598082) Attached to: Midwest Seeing Red Over 'Green' Traffic Lights

You switch to LEDs to save energy, changing back strikes me as failing to address the root cause, temperature.

Where I live we have a couple of awkward corners so they mounted mirrors to allow people to see oncoming traffic. As we get snow, those mirrors have a built-in heating element that only switches on when it's cold - precisely the right idea.

If I recall correctly, there's also a self-regulating tape which is used to be embedded with water pipes to prevent them from freezing, so it's not like there aren't any solutions.

Just going back to wasting energy ALL THE TIME is mad IMHO.

Comment: Re:Obvious answer? (Score 1) 736

by Wyatt Earp (#30597614) Attached to: Why Do So Many Terrorists Have Engineering Degrees

Nope, most of the engineering degreed terrorists went to school in Europe, further more, most don't come from the oil-rich states, but from the Yemen/Sudan/Egypt/PA type states. Yes, most on 9/11 were Saudi, but even then the free educations in Saudi Arabia are in theology, not engineering.

Atta went to school in Germany, Yahya Ayyash got a engineering degree from BZU*, Ramzi Binalshibh was Yemeni and went to school in Germany.

And this connection isn't new, the Israelis talked about it in the book "The Hunt for the Engineer", Kaplan talked about it, engineering and terrorism have been linked for a decade or so.

* - I just missed being on the Egged 36 bus when Yahya Ayyash bombed it.

Comment: Re:A serious question... (Score 2, Interesting) 623

by Brentyl (#26753203) Attached to: Utah Mulls a Database of Bar Customers

I can address the "which tourists would join a club" question. I used to be a sales rep in the outdoor industry, for tents, backpacks, boots, whatnot. The industry's twice-yearly trade show was in Salt Lake City, so I would spend the greater part of a week in SLC twice a year. During that time, it's really nice to be able to grab a beer with your partners, or your clients, or your friends from the other side of the country you only see twice a year...

fwiw, we rarely got hassled to "join" a club. I don't know if they relaxed the rules during those weeks in the face of thousands of heathens coming in from the outside, or if they tired of hearing each of those heathens saying, "Private membership club wot wot?" but only once that I recall did we have to sign up as members. And that was actually pretty funny - my buddy is a smartass, and went on a riff about what benefits we could expect, when do they mail the newsletter, is there a profit-sharing option, and so on - the waitress was lost.

Some oddities did exist, though: iirc, you could not order pitchers of anything, only individual drinks. You could only have one drink at a time, so if you ordered "another round", the server could not set the new drink down in front of you until you drained the first one or gave it to the server. And all the beer was 3.2, which is basically beer for people who like to pee a lot.

"Just think of a computer as hardware you can program." -- Nigel de la Tierre

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