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Comment: Sitting team handball perhaps? (Score 1) 177

by tepples (#48669569) Attached to: Should Video Games Be In the Olympics?

Basketball, team handball, soccer, rugby and gridiron football are members of a family of sports based on advancing the ball into the goal based on restrictions against arbitrarily carrying it. A Paralympic sport in the same family is wheelchair basketball. I wonder what sort of other sports in the same family could be invented for people with no legs like Jennifer Bricker in the same way that volleyball was adapted into sitting volleyball.

Comment: StepMania, but not yet (Score 1) 177

by tepples (#48669485) Attached to: Should Video Games Be In the Olympics?

How do you define dancing games as well? These are clearly very physically demanding games.

Once Konami's patents on Dance Dance Revolution expire in a few more years, I would be willing to add StepMania alongside floor exercise. StepMania is physical but doesn't need nearly as many human judges as the existing gymnastic events.

Comment: Games leave the market (Score 1) 177

by tepples (#48669465) Attached to: Should Video Games Be In the Olympics?

Any argument against e-sports works equally well against shooting and archery

You can still buy new equipment for shooting or archery. You can't buy new equipment for pre-infinite-spin Tetris because Tetris Holding won't let anybody sell it.

competitive archery is one of the oldest sports, at least 2800 years old

I'm in favor of including any sport that's at least 95 years old.

Comment: Unavailability of copies of old games (Score 1) 177

by tepples (#48669431) Attached to: Should Video Games Be In the Olympics?

Because virtual shooting changes far more rapidly than physical shooting. Strategies that work in Call of Duty: Modern Warfare may fail in Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3. Even if you standardize on one particular iteration of a series, there's no guarantee that the game's publisher will still be willing to sell copies of the old iteration. And the demise of GameSpy has shown that multiplayer won't even be available in older games after a service provider hardcoded into the game pulls the plug.

Comment: Re:Motion blur is temporal AA (Score 1) 147

by tepples (#48669385) Attached to: Human Eye's Oscillation Rate Determines Smooth Frame Rate

You need something like 50+ images per frame to create the illusion of smoothness, and at that point you're better off simply presenting 100 frames per second and letting the human eye apply blur.

A standard TV can't present 100 frames per second. The tradeoff becomes whether to improve realism by adding more detailed lighting (which takes longer to compute) or by simplifying geometry and lighting to hit 120 fps, rendering twice, and combining them into a 60 fps picture for the TV.

Comment: Re:Can YOU show me where I claim that? (Score 1) 283

by tepples (#48669359) Attached to: BT, Sky, and Virgin Enforce UK Porn Blocks By Hijacking Browsers

even if at times you've appeared to claim that the hosts file is a panacea.

I never *ONCE* have!

You don't claim that. Others have accused you of claiming that, and that's where they pick up misconceptions. The hosts file is one layer, and in-browser policy add-ons are another layer to pick up anything bad that slips past hosts.

hosts even add anonymity (vs. dns request logs)

This use of hosts essentially treats it as a DNS cache. But you still have to make DNS requests after the cache period expires to see if the record has changed. Otherwise, after the site you're trying to access has moved to a different IP address, you'll likely end up hitting the server of the attacker who has snagged that same address.

Comment: Re:Good news! (Score 1) 171

by pla (#48669133) Attached to: Sony To Release the Interview Online Today; Apple Won't Play Ball
And even if they were the same, I love how /. is so fixated on one mistake one department made over a decade ago.

How about the repeat three years ago?

And let's not forget about "OtherOS" four years ago.

Or profiteering from Whitney Houston's extremely convenient death two years ago.


No, Sony's PR problem doesn't come from "one mistake one department made over a decade ago", it comes from their entire corporate ethos, which their latest woes merely exemplify. They pretty much have made it a holiday tradition of shoving their foot up our asses on a yearly basis, and then expecting us to just smile and ask when the next gen of Playstation will come out so we can re-buy our entire game library that doesn't work on their empty promises of backward compatibility.

Comment: Re:Violence against police ... (Score 2, Informative) 307

by pla (#48667571) Attached to: Study: Police Body-Cams Reduce Unacceptable Use of Force
Again, exceptions don't prove the rule.

You have an odd definition of "exceptions", when I specifically included both the bad cops and the rest of their departments. "But you left out that one really really good cop in a coma for the past 30 years!"


And bystander videos do not exactly tell the whole story.

True enough. Why, in that first video I linked, you don't get to see the context - That the guy had just run over a spike mat, lost control of the vehicle, and almost hit a cop. Clearly that missing details justifies half a dozen armed thugs beating the shit out of an unconscious guy lying bleeding on the side of the highway. Damned biased bystanders, always trying to make the police look bad!


We get to see a far more complete portrayal of events.

Except, of course, when the cameras "malfunction" at those very convenient moments when the accused suddenly has an attack of clumsiness and walks into a brick wall... Repeatedly.


That is why police body cams are so much more useful.

And that is why police hate hate hate mandatory camera policies to the point that they piss and moan and vandalized the cameras and threaten to go on illegal strikes over them.

"No job too big; no fee too big!" -- Dr. Peter Venkman, "Ghost-busters"

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