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Submission + - Clojure 1.0 Released (

Hornsby writes: "Yesterday marked the official release of Clojure 1.0. After several years of heavy development, the 1.0 branch will enable people to consume a stable version of Clojure and move to bugfix-only incremental versions while preserving API stability. Clojure was produced over the course of a self-funded sabbatical by it's author, Rich Hickey, and aims to provide a modern Lisp running on the JVM with excellent support for concurrency and Java interoperability."
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Submission + - SPAM: Brainwaves power new neural gaming headset

destinyland writes: "A new gaming headset converts electrical brain impulses into wireless signals, allowing players to literally "pick up and move objects with the power of their minds." EPOC will finally release their neuro-headset later this year, saying its battery-powered brain/computer interface can identify 30 different emotions (without electrodes or scalp gel). Eventually these could be mapped to facial expressions for avatars in virtual worlds or chatrooms, but the $299 headset can also be used to browse files and applications using brainwaves."
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New Contestants On the Turing Test 630

vitamine73 writes "At 9 a.m. next Sunday, six computer programs — 'artificial conversational entities' — will answer questions posed by human volunteers at the University of Reading in a bid to become the first recognized 'thinking' machine. If any program succeeds, it is likely to be hailed as the most significant breakthrough in artificial intelligence since the IBM supercomputer Deep Blue beat world chess champion Garry Kasparov in 1997. It could also raise profound questions about whether a computer has the potential to be 'conscious' — and if humans should have the 'right' to switch it off."

Getting Paid To Abandon an Open Source Project? 654

darkeye writes "I'm facing a difficult dilemma and looking for opinions. I've been contributing heavily to an open source project, making considerable changes to code organization and quality, but the work is unfinished at the moment. Now, a company is approaching me to continue my changes. They want to keep the improvements to themselves, which is possible since the project is published under the BSD license. That's fair, as they have all the rights to the work they pay for in full. However, they also want me to sign a non-competition clause, which would bar me from ever working on and publishing results for the original open source project itself, even if done separately, in my free time. How would you approach such a decision? On one side, they'd provide resources to work on an interesting project. On the other, it would make me an outcast in the project's community. Moreover, they would take ownership of not just what they paid for, but also my changes leading up to this moment, and I wouldn't be able to continue on my original codebase in an open source manner if I sign their contract."

New Solar Cell Sets World Efficiency Record 299

asoduk writes to tell us that a new world record has been set for the most efficient photovoltaic device. Topping the scale at 40.8% efficiency, the new solar cell differs significantly from the previous record holder. "Instead of using a germanium wafer as the bottom junction of the device, the new design uses compositions of gallium indium phosphide and gallium indium arsenide to split the solar spectrum into three equal parts that are absorbed by each of the cell's three junctions for higher potential efficiencies. This is accomplished by growing the solar cell on a gallium arsenide wafer, flipping it over, then removing the wafer. The resulting device is extremely thin and light and represents a new class of solar cells with advantages in performance, design, operation and cost."

World's Oldest Rocks Found 254

Smivs writes "The BBC reports that Earth's most ancient rocks, with an age of 4.28 billion years, have been found on the shore of Hudson Bay, Canada. Writing in Science journal, a team reports finding that a sample of Nuvvuagittuq greenstone is 250 million years older than any rocks known. It may even hold evidence of activity by ancient life forms. If so, it would be the earliest evidence of life on Earth — but co-author Don Francis cautioned that this had not been established. 'The rocks contain a very special chemical signature — one that can only be found in rocks which are very, very old,' he said."

"There are things that are so serious that you can only joke about them" - Heisenberg