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Comment: IRS - Taxes (Score -1, Troll) 50

by Archangel Michael (#49495625) Attached to: For the most recent tax year ...

Tax day reminds us, that all taxes are regressive.

The idea that a tax can be "progressive" is simply a fairy-tale lie to get people to pay more taxes, under the guise of "their fair share" (nebulous term meaning anything and everything). The reality is, taxes are falling on those that cannot afford to not pay, and those that cannot afford to avoid them (i.e. Middle Class).

Every time a liberal cries about the rich, just know it is your pocketbook that will be impacted.

Comment: Re:Youngest ever? False. (Score 1) 308

Um, you failed to actually answer the question I actually asked.

While you are 100% accurate about when "personhood" begins (being Philosophical), we do know that premature babies as young as 24 weeks of gestation have been born, and survived. Would you at least say that was at least one likely boundry of "personhood"?

This is not arbitrary boundary, it is one established by survivability outside the womb.

None of them allow aborting while in labor when the mother's life isn't in danger. Almost none allow it when close to labor.

"Almost" doesn't mean what you think it means. "Almost None" means some. Some isn't none. Lets rephrase your statement in the positive shall we?

None of them allow aborting while in labor when the mother's life isn't in danger. Some even allow it when close to labor.

How you phrase things to minimize the effect doesn't actually negate it at all, which is kind of what you were aiming for. I happen to be able to phrase the exact same meaning in a sentence (Almost None=Some) that conveys a completely different connotation. Since both terms are equally nebulous they are equal in meaning.

Comment: Re:Hasn't this been proven to be junk science? (Score 1) 308

To hope is to long for circumstances to change. That is to say, one rejects what is real and wishes instead for a fantasy.

Here is my refutation of this. Hope and being grounded in the Here and Now (present reality) are not mutually exclusive, nor did he present any argument suggesting they are.

I am FULLY AWARE that today's world sucks in many ways, I HOPE that the suckage will change when real grownups start to run the world instead of mental three year old who react based on emotional arguments, rather than logic and thought.

My hope is not fully dependent upon what is the "now". I realize that my chances of my hope coming to fruition is between slim and none, simply because the powers to be think the best person to run for president for the Democrats and Republicans are Clinton and Bush.

Comment: Re:Youngest ever? False. (Score 1) 308

While you are 100% accurate about when "personhood" begins (being Philosophical), we do know that premature babies as young as 24 weeks of gestation have been born, and survived. Would you at least say that was at least one likely boundry of "personhood"?

The problem is, that the Blue State abortion fanatics refuse to establish even a baseline, because they know that once that line is drawn in the sand, it can be argued for movement. They refuse to even define the line in the sand, because they are just as fanatical as the Red State crowd on this issue.

Making it about Red State anti scientific types, when it is much more nuanced than that, is a disservice to the discussion.

Here is my suggestion for "personhood", legal scientific accurate. Personhood starts the moment the fetus (baby) is able to survive outside the womb. We know when that is, because we have proof via example.

Comment: Re:Speed rarely matters (Score 1) 142

by Archangel Michael (#49480719) Attached to: How do your actual ISP speeds compare to the advertised speed?

Speed doesn't matter, Congrestion matters. You can have all the "speed" you need, but if the network is congested it doesn't matter. I could have a 10Gig link, and it wouldn't matter if somewhere between me and the other end, it is congested.

You can have your 80 MBS Cable connection, and be able to pull the full 80, but if you're congested down the line, speed doesn't matter.

Here is a test, set up a BitTorrent of some popular Movie ISO, set it to FULL SPEED to your desktop/laptop. Then setup a console (XBOX) to Netflix, and see how good your Netflix is.Now run your Speedtest while watching a movie, downloading a torrent at the same time. Your "speed" doesn't matter, and your SpeedTest will reflect that you're not getting your 80 MB speed, but that is not accurate, because you are.

Comment: M.2 Specification (Score 1) 72

Looking at the Wikipedia Article and the images for the different pinouts for the M.2 Specification, I have serious concerns about the ability to inadvertently flipping the cards, and inserting them upside down. Take a look at the B vs M configuration, which is exactly a mirror of each other.

UNLESS there is part of the spec that I am not seeing about another notching somewhere, the ability to flip these over and inserting them wrong is going to be a huge issue. And looking at all the examples on the page, I don't see anything to mitigate against inserting these upside down.

Comment: Speed rarely matters (Score 3, Interesting) 142

by Archangel Michael (#49478645) Attached to: How do your actual ISP speeds compare to the advertised speed?

Speed rarely matters.

Speedtest and other such metrics often fail because the ISP codes routing to support better than real results.

What really matters is capacity of the whole network. Does the network itself route efficiently for all protocols and destinations. Speed is just one indicator of capacity, but isn't the be all, end all measurement.

At work, I sit on the end of a Gig pipeline out to the internet, Capacity is fine. Speed doesn't indicate what the capacity limit is. As long as you have capacity, speed is not ever going to be issue. The problem is when Capacity is near max, the speed suffers (symptomatically), however it is still possible to have speed tests succeed when capacity is impacted by watching for speed tests and giving network priority to those, while neglecting regular traffic, giving the appearances of speed where capacity is at limit, producing inaccurate results, "my speed is fine, but Netflix is still buffering"

Give me real monitoring tools, and I'll show you where the network problems are, and it is rarely "speed".

Comment: Re:Don't fix what ain't broke (Score 1) 183

"allows more" means "not all of them" and means "veterans are still at the mercy of our decisions"

And it was in direct response to the outcry from the public after the politicians didn't do anything other than lip service to the problems being exposed.

The fact is, the VA system still sucks, still has inordinate wait times for those that do not have the "get out free" card outlined in the news account you gave.

My actual solution would be to require congress to use the VA as their sole service provider. THEN you'd see real improvement.

If you think nobody cares if you're alive, try missing a couple of car payments. -- Earl Wilson

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