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Comment: Re:Bad apps crash. News at 11. (Score 2) 358

by Bohiti (#38935333) Attached to: iOS Vs. Android: Which Has the Crashiest Apps?

Yeah but are you going to get the plan anyways? It does lock you in, but if you were going to get the service, there's no reason to not sign the contract just out of principle. And you can get cheaper plans. Me, for example, have organized a 5-line family plan on Sprint and pay what divides up to about $40 per phone for unlimited everything smartphones.

Comment: Re:Bad apps crash. News at 11. (Score 5, Insightful) 358

by Bohiti (#38934551) Attached to: iOS Vs. Android: Which Has the Crashiest Apps?

In the short term, I'll probably opt for a BASIC voice-and-text flip-phone of some kind, because I can't afford (nor stomach!) spending $600 on a PHONE whose MAIN purpose is to MAKE CALLS when I can get a $70 model that will take care of that primary function just fine for now.

Its a common perspective, but first of all most people (at least in the US) buy their phone subsidized with a contract renewal, so the price for even a top-tier phone is $200-$300. Second, for me personally after using smartphones for a few years, I view it as the most significant personal (non-work) computing device I use daily. I definitely use it more than my home PC and tablet combined, and can therefore justify spending top dollar on a quality "phone". I won't make assumptions about you, but I know many people who found, when they get a smartphone, that its main purpose is NOT to make calls.

Comment: Re:Most importantly... (Score 1) 216

by Bohiti (#38144300) Attached to: CarrierIQ Tries To Silence Security Researcher

To be real specific, it would depend on the custom ROM. All of the Cyanogenmod builds should be free of CIQ, but if the ROM is based off stock, it all depends on how savvy the ROM-cooker is at removing CIQ, or whether it's even been updated since this information began spreading. ROMs based on stock builds from 6 months ago will still have CIQ.

Comment: Re:Badware? (Score 1) 259

by Bohiti (#29067503) Attached to: Digsby IM Client Quietly Installs Badware

Disregard my parent post. I googled "Badware" and it is a widely used term I wasn't familiar with. The likes of Google, Mozilla, Lenovo, PayPal, VeriSign, Sun, Consumer Reports are on board for this nonprofit StopBadware.org.

From their help page: "What is badware? Badware is software that fundamentally disregards a user's choice regarding how his or her computer will be used." Sounds about right.

Comment: Re:Badware? (Score 1) 259

by Bohiti (#29067379) Attached to: Digsby IM Client Quietly Installs Badware

I certainly agree that making up words and using them like they're common knowledge is a little unsavory, but "malware" is slightly off-target in this case. By definition, "Malicious Software". I wouldn't call this malicious, its not actively harming you, your data, or you computer (minus a few missing CPU cycles). Perhaps deceive-ware is more appropriate?

Comment: Re:What about this one? (Score 1) 241

by Bohiti (#28988541) Attached to: Microsoft Denies Windows 7 "Showstopper Bug"
In my experience, its less necessary for me than is for my friends and family. Their Windows life cycle usually is something like:

I give them a fresh install.
They install iTunes+Quicktime+Safari
They get a new printer and let the CD that came with it install all 15 services
Install questionable game
Get adware
I come over, clean adware.
Upgrade iTunes, adding the fancy new apple service no one needs
Upgrade HP Printing suite, adding fancy new HP service no one needs

...I could keep going...

In the end there are 50 processes in Task Manager that have nothing to do with that my friend or relative wants to use their computer for. I could spend a weekend cleaning it off, but at that point its more straightforward to just start off fresh.

Comment: Re:Vista is that bad for general and non gamer use (Score 1) 183

by Bohiti (#27357475) Attached to: Windows 7 RC Download Page Points To May Release

These HP, Dell, Lenovo systems all come pre-loaded with so much junk, it really does slow the system down a measurable amount. All these Security Suites with 30 running services, alternative media players, Vendor "Help Centers", "Imaging assistants" -- it's all junk.

Folks, the second you unbox that new system, run http://www.pcdecrapifier.com/, and let it clean this junk off. You'll have a much better experience, regardless of the base OS.

Comment: Re:I'm guessing VMWare isn't that worried (Score 1) 259

by Bohiti (#26965337) Attached to: Citrix XenServer Virtualization Platform Now Free

ARGGGGGGHHGHGHH! I just snapped. The amount of misunderstanding and misinformation in this thread is astounding. I shouldn't be surprised I suppose, I'm not that new here.

People are comparing totally different products throughout this discussion. The worst was: XenServer versus VMware Fusion. "Vmware can run OSX". Oh really? I specialized VMware desktop product can run OSX, while XenServer can't? Well guess what, neither can VMware ESX.

Folks, the comparable products here are VMware ESX (and/or ESXi) and XenServer. These are their respective companies' enterprise offerings, the main designator being running on BARE METAL. Other products like VMware Server, Fusion, VirtualBox, are all hosted (run on top of an operating system). Whether they work well or not doesn't matter for the bulk of this discussion.

It's not so hard to lift yourself by your bootstraps once you're off the ground. -- Daniel B. Luten

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