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Submission + - How Iceland is trying to make "actual journalism" legal (

An anonymous reader writes: Following the devastating financial collapse of 2008, the people of Iceland have become determined to reform media in a way that keeps the public knowledgeable in the hopes of avoiding another catastrophic incident. And they want to bring the rest of the world along with them.

In Reykjavik, Hopes&Fears talks to Guðjón Idir, Director of the Icelandic Modern Media Initiative, about how the organization aims to make Iceland the safest country in the world for journalists and journalism.

Submission + - California Exports Gasoline to Mexico Despite 'Shortage' writes: Thomas Elias writes in the Los Angeles Daily News that just one week before many California motorists began paying upwards of $4.30 per gallon for gasoline, oil tanker Teesta Spirit left Los Angeles headed for ports on the west coast of Mexico carrying more 300,000 barrels of gasoline refined in California. At a time when oil companies were raising prices by as much as $1 per gallon in some regions, oil companies like Chevron and Phillips 66 shipped about 100 million gallons of gasoline out of California. “Oil refiners have kept the state running on empty and now they are sending fuel refined in California abroad just as the specter of low inventories drives huge price increases," says Jamie Court, president of the Consumer Watchdog advocacy group.

According to Elias as the oil companies were shipping out that fuel, they reaped unprecedented profits reportedly approaching $1.50 for every gallon of gasoline they sold at the higher prices. "Gasoline prices are determined by market forces, and individuals who understand how commodity markets work have recently testified that those markets are working as they should," responded Catherine Reheis-Boyd, President of the Western States Petroleum Association, to charges of price gouging. "All of the many government investigations into gasoline markets in recent years have concluded that supply and demand are the primary reason gas prices go up and down." Kathleen Foote, who heads up the antitrust division at the California attorney general’s office, agreed that the industry operates like an oligopoly in the state. But proving price fixing is difficult in a field where only a few players exist. "This system is made to break because oil refineries keep it running on empty," concludes Court. "They have every incentive to create a price spike like this."

Submission + - FCC rules to prevent installing alternate firmware on your router (

An anonymous reader writes: CNXSoft Embedded System News reports on an upcoming talk at "Wireless battle of the mesh" in Slovenia:

The new FCC rules are in effect in the United States from June 2nd 2015 for WiFi devices such as Access Points. They require to have the firmware locked down so End-Users can’t operate with non-compliant parameters (channels/frequencies, transmit power, DFS, ). In response, WiFi access point vendors start to lock down firmwares to prevent custom firmwares (such as OpenWRT) to be installed, using code signing, etc.

Read more:

Submission + - House and Senate Science Committees in Creationists Hands. ( 3

willy everlearn writes: Does anyone else find it scary that we have put creationists on both the House and Senate's science committies? The very core of a creationist's argument is"No matter what evidence you show me my belief will continue." Extend this to Climate Change, Vaccinations or any other of myriad topices these right wing hold as sacred. What can we do about it?

Submission + - X-rays + STM = Chemical fingerprinting at the atomic limit (

millimicronano writes: (—A team of researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and Ohio University have devised a powerful technique that simultaneously resolves the chemical characterization and topography of nanoscale materials down to the height of a single atom. The technique combines synchrotron X-rays (SX) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). In experiments, the researchers used SX as a probe and a nanofabricated smart tip of a STM as a detector.

Submission + - Every weapon, armored truck, and plane the Pentagon gave to local police (

v3rgEz writes: You may have heard that the image-conscious Los Angeles Unified School District chose to return the grenade launchers it received from the Defense Department’s surplus equipment program. You probably have not heard about some of the more obscure beneficiaries of the Pentagon giveaway, but now you can after MuckRock got the Department of Defense to release the full database, letting anyone browse what gear their local department has received.

Submission + - Operation AURORAGOLD: How the NSA hacks cellphone networks worldwide (

Advocatus Diaboli writes: The documents also reveal how the NSA plans to secretly introduce new flaws into communication systems so that they can be tapped into—a controversial tactic that security experts say could be exposing the general population to criminal hackers. Codenamed AURORAGOLD, the covert operation has monitored the content of messages sent and received by more than 1,200 email accounts associated with major cellphone network operators, intercepting confidential company planning papers that help the NSA hack into phone networks.

Submission + - Lego Ends Shell Partnership Under Greenpeace Pressure 1

jones_supa writes: Since 1960s, we have been seeing the oil company Shell logo being featured in some Lego sets, and Legos being distributed at petrol stations in 26 countries. This marketing partnership is coming to an end, after coming under sustained pressure from Greenpeace. The environmental campaign, protesting about the oil giant's plans to drill in the Arctic, came with a YouTube video that depicted pristine Arctic, built from 120 kg of Lego, being covered in oil. CEO of Lego, Jørgen Vig Knudstorp, wants to leave the dispute between Greenpeace and Shell, and the toy company is getting out of the way.

Submission + - Scientists Twist Radio Beams to Send Data at 32 Gigabits p/s, Faster Than LTE ( 1

concertina226 writes: Scientists from three international universities have succeeded in twisting radio beams in order to transfer data at the speed of 32 gigabits per second, which is 30 times faster than 4G LTE wireless technology in use today.

The researchers, led by Alan Willner, an electrical engineering professor with the University of Southern California Viterbi School of Engineering, successfully demonstrated data transmission rates of 32 gigabits per second across 2.5m of free space in a basement laboratory.

Millimetre waves occupy the 30GHz to 300GHz frequency bands. They are found in the spectrum between microwaves, which take up the 1GHz to 30GHz bands, and infrared waves, which are sometimes known as extremely high frequency (EHF).

Submission + - Google boosts Chrome performance with background Javascript compilation

kc123 writes: The latest version of Chrome includes improvements in JavaScript compilation according to the Chromium blog. Historically, Chrome compiled JavaScript on the main thread, where it could interfere with the performance of the JavaScript application. For large pieces of code this could become a nuisance, and in complex applications like games it could even lead to stuttering and dropped frames. In the latest Chrome Beta they've enabled concurrent compilation, which offloads a large part of the optimizing compilation phase to a background thread. The result is that JavaScript applications remain responsive and performance gets a boost.

Submission + - Google Speeds Up Chrome By Compiling JavaScript Concurrently

An anonymous reader writes: Google today revealed a tweak it has made in the latest Chrome beta to further boost performance: concurrent compilation, which offloads a large part of the optimizing compilation phase to a background thread. Previously, Chrome compiled JavaScript on the main thread, where it could interfere with the performance of the JavaScript application.

Submission + - Colorado Department of Transportation in secret deals with private corporations.

telkis writes: It appears that not just the federal government can make secret deals. The
Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) is attempting to push through a 50
year privatization deal of a federal highway with Goldman Sachs and an
Australian toll road company called the Plenary Group.

Additional details at

Just my opinion but will our taxes provide no services for the average citizen?

Submission + - Scientists find the first gene which appears to be linked to intelligence (

Third Position writes: A gene which may make people more intelligent has been discovered by scientists.
Researchers have found that teenagers who had a highly functioning NPTN gene performed better in intelligence tests.
It is thought the NPTN gene indirectly affects how the brain cells communicate and may control the formation of the cerebral cortex, the outermost layer of the human brain, also known as ‘grey matter.’

Submission + - Europe Considers Wholesale Savings Confiscation, Enforced Redistribution ( 1

schwit1 writes: Everything that the depositors and citizens of Cyprus had to live through, may be on the verge of going continental. In a nutshell, and in Reuters' own words, "the savings of the European Union's 500 million citizens could be used to fund long-term investments to boost the economy and help plug the gap left by banks since the financial crisis, an EU document says." What is left unsaid is that the "usage" will be on a purely involuntary basis, at the discretion of the "union", and can thus best be described as confiscation.

Submission + - Rand Paul files suit against Obama over NSA's collection of metadata

RoccamOccam writes: Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul (R) is filing a class action lawsuit against President Obama and other members of his administration over the National Security Agency's collection of phone metadata, a practice he believes violates the Fourth Amendment. In a YouTube video released Tuesday, Paul compared the government surveillance to the warrantless searches practiced by the British military prior to American independence.

All Finagle Laws may be bypassed by learning the simple art of doing without thinking.