Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Aerial or underground ? (Score 1) 496

by Bob the Super Hamste (#48468137) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Why Is the Power Grid So Crummy In So Many Places?
And now I am suddenly reminded of helping a friend clean the squirrels out of his window unit AC in a 4th story apartment. One of the little bastards got caught in the fan, bounced around inside for a few revolutions and got flung out into the parking lot.I still find that way too funny.

Comment: Re:The Same Game (Score 1) 429

by Bob the Super Hamste (#48459929) Attached to: Researchers Say the Tech Worker Shortage Doesn't Really Exist
They probably should have recruited from some of the local schools. I did corn detasseling for minimum wage from age 12 to age 15 when I was finally able to get a non agricultural job. Hard manual unskilled labor in hot humid corn fields for 8 hours a day with an hour lunch. So the question in your case should be what would it have taken to get people out in the fields as agricultural workers, it wasn't the ~ $7/hr minimum wage but might it have been $8/hr or $15/hr?

Comment: Re:Number of interviews... (Score 1) 429

by Bob the Super Hamste (#48459801) Attached to: Researchers Say the Tech Worker Shortage Doesn't Really Exist
I always hated group projects in gen-ed classes in college. I had a group research paper in one of my writing classes. The rest of the group didn't do a fucking thing as far as gathering information, providing input, or typing the thing up they assumed I would just do it. One of the group members even stated that she didn't have 30 minutes in the next 96 hours to go down to the school library and check out 3 potential sources to take on spring brake with her. I did do the paper but left their names off and handed it in. Before it was returned a couple of weeks later the TA asked to see me after class and stated that she knew who my group was and wanted to know why only my name was on the paper. When the papers where handed back I was docked 20% for not being a team player and got the B on the paper. My "group" members came over and asked what they had gotten on the paper to which I replied that I had gotten a B on the paper I turned in but didn't know what their grades where on their paper since mine only had my name on it and that they should go ask the TA. Turns out they all got 0s on it so I was still happy with the end result.

Contrast that with the projects that could optionally be done in group in my upper level undergraduate major courses where you know the people and everyone is in competition to out do each other and we did some cool things (autonomous robots playing tag with obstacle avoidance, optimizing compiler for our own created object oriented language) and no one slacked off. Those were good projects and were a lot of fun

Comment: Re:Number of interviews... (Score 1) 429

by Bob the Super Hamste (#48459461) Attached to: Researchers Say the Tech Worker Shortage Doesn't Really Exist
I have always like to ask them to solve a problem. I will throw and idea out at them (usually something I worked on recently that is fresh in my mind) and ask them to try to solve it. I am not looking for someone to get the right answer, or even come up with a complete quick solution. What I am looking for is someone who is willing to think and work through a problem. I even tell them they can ask me questions and discuss with me. There are a lot of people who just say "I don't know" and give up or say they never studied that type of problem in school. Even then I am willing to prod them along seeing if I can get them to start thinking for themselves but a good number just refuse to do so. The people who are willing to try work things out are the ones I am looking for, I don't want someone who throws in the towel but will dig in to a bizarre problem as that is a lot of what I do and the people in my group do. For example a customer rolled their own code into sshd and it broke a bunch of stuff and they don't bother to tell you so you get to figure out what is wrong with the system.

As a side note in my younger college years working at a gas station as assistant manager I liked to ask in interviews the question "Why shouldn't I hire your?" as you would get all sorts of why would you say that type of responses. But there you are dealing with a different type of person who is applying for a minimum wage position.

Comment: Re:Number of interviews... (Score 1) 429

by Bob the Super Hamste (#48459275) Attached to: Researchers Say the Tech Worker Shortage Doesn't Really Exist
How about some form of the pigeonhole sort for physically sorting 1000 numbered sheets of paper? Put me in a conference room and let me have at it. If I have more information on the numbers like they are all sequential from 1 to 1000 then something like a radix sort might be faster.

Comment: Re:Duh (Score 1) 429

by Bob the Super Hamste (#48459135) Attached to: Researchers Say the Tech Worker Shortage Doesn't Really Exist
That is what always gets me. I get calls and e-mails from companies fairly regularly looking for someone with my skill set. I live in a fairly low cost area and they want me to relocate to a higher cost one but yet the pay is 1/2 to 1/3 what I am currently making. I laugh at them and have told them I already make 2 to 3 times what they are offering and that it would take at least 2x what I currently make to get me to relocate out of my low cost area to their high cost area. I'm not going voluntarily decrease my standard of living just to change jobs.

Comment: Re:Duh (Score 1) 429

by Bob the Super Hamste (#48459029) Attached to: Researchers Say the Tech Worker Shortage Doesn't Really Exist
What I always hear is from those pushing for more H-1B visas is that they need these people and cannot find anyone who can do the job. Given how critical these individuals are made out to be for the companies it would only seem correct to open up the floodgates to fill all of these critical positions. I would be all for this provided that these individuals are also compensated as such. Meaning that they are the highest compensated person working at a company, taking into account all benefits and other forms of compensation like bonuses, stock options, relocation expenses, access to corporate travel, vacation, etc. If your company is in such dire need for an individual with these skills that you can't find someone in the entire US who has those skills or can't afford the time and expense to train someone then this must truly be an exceptional skill set and thus should be compensated as such.

For a small company who needs to bring on a foreign worker for a short span of time to accomplish a highly specialized task this shouldn't be too big of a deal as they are a small company and I doubt the highest paid person is rolling in cash and it would only be for a limited time. For large companies that are basically body farms or are trying to depress wages well sucks to be you, you lying fuckers.

Comment: Re:I just don't understand (Score 1) 1087

by Bob the Super Hamste (#48457575) Attached to: Officer Not Charged In Michael Brown Shooting

How was there Brown's blood more than 150 feet from the cop car and Brown's body was fell around 130 feet(blood splatter does not go 20+ feet) ?

I would think it could go 20 feet from my experience having done deer hunting. Granted that was with a high powered rifle with a heavy expanding type bullet (203 grain soft point) but it has always been shooting in a downward direction but there was always a big spray out the exit wound at least 6 feet. Also getting shot in the heart or lungs means there will be a lot of blood out the exit wound. Finally if Brown was running forward he probably would have kept running for at least a few more steps before falling since getting shot doesn't usually drop the target instantly as every deer I have shot has been a good shot yet they still all ran about 20-40 meters.

The reason that every major university maintains a department of mathematics is that it's cheaper than institutionalizing all those people.

Working...