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Comment: Re:Btrfs features forced on users? (Score 1) 198

by Bob Loblaw (#36389240) Attached to: Fedora 16 To Use Btrfs Filesystem By Default

On top of that, I am quite certain that this isn't going to affect upgrades at all.

The partition layout/filesystem types that you had before are going to be the ones you have after just like the vast majority of upgrades before now.

So no one's existing files are going to be affected.

Comment: Re:Rollback system changes (Score 3, Insightful) 198

by Bob Loblaw (#36388940) Attached to: Fedora 16 To Use Btrfs Filesystem By Default

There was already a yum plugin for this (yum-plugin-fs-shapshot) as far back as F13 as mentioned here: http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Btrfs_in_Fedora_13

It will do an automatic btrfs snapshot of affected filesystems before every yum transaction so that you can go back to whatever point you want. Also, since it is partition dependent, you can rollback your system partition and not undo changes you may have made to your home directories if you have those on different partitions.

btrfs is quite powerful but I have found that the user/GUI tools have not come up to speed yet. I have been using btrfs from my F15 netbook and it seems to have caused no issues so far. However, enabling transparent compression and any tweaking has entailed editing /etc/fstab (never a thing to do lightly) and command lines.

Hopefully some of the GUI disk management tools will start to make available some of the capabilities of btrfs.

Comment: Re:NAT traversal in practice? (Score 1) 199

by Bob Loblaw (#36326782) Attached to: Google WebRTC: Can It Replace Skype?

DD-WRT does support IPv6 and has some setup info here:
http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/IPv6

While the native firmware may not, OpenWRT and DD-WRT bring that support to a lot of routers.

When you sign up with a tunnel broker, you get a ridiculous number of IP addresses assigned to you (you get a whole subnet). So I think once people get the hang of it and their are rubber stamp solutions available, NAT will die off.

Comment: Re:NAT traversal in practice? (Score 1) 199

by Bob Loblaw (#36324364) Attached to: Google WebRTC: Can It Replace Skype?

Unfortunately, the same is true for any peer to peer protocol. NAT breaks the Internet and there will never be a perfect workaround.

Never say never. NAT will mostly die out with IPv6 given that each person could have many directly routable IP addresses and there will still be lots left over. You switch over for free right now with a tunnel broker if you want.

The auxiliary security aspect of NAT will keep it around for a while I think. But there are better options and a simple firewall rule on the router can replicate the same thing if you only want outgoing connections.

Comment: Re:Google Voice (Score 3, Informative) 199

by Bob Loblaw (#36324218) Attached to: Google WebRTC: Can It Replace Skype?

Sadly, Google Voice is not available to non-US users. Also, even if you lived in the US and obtained a Google Voice account, it is not usable when abroad. I am in that situation now unfortunately. If I use a VPN to connect out of the US, the Call option shows up in the GMail interface but not otherwise. It is kind of bizarre for them to limit this since computer to computer GTalk is not limited and it wouldn't seem to use up any more resources.

Comment: Re:Not a good idea.... (Score 1) 132

by Bob Loblaw (#35009656) Attached to: Fedora 15 Changes Network Device Naming Scheme

Actually, Matt Domsch is from Dell ... not Redhat. So you can take the tinfoil-hat-of-conspiracy off (or put on another layer depending on your feelings towards Dell). This change is coming from an actual *need* from a certain segment of Linux users/admins. I suspect anyone who has had to deal with NIC failure/reconfiguration on a system with more than 2 cards will welcome this as it is trying to take advantage of newer BIOS technology to deterministically assign names to cards based on the actual physical location. Those with 2 or less will have to do little to no work in order to adapt to a change in nomenclature.

This change won't affect desktop people at all. The vast majority only have one NIC and they don't even know/care what it is called since Network Manager takes care of everything. Also, there are bug days being scheduled tomorrow to make sure that all the wrongly hard-coded scripts and programs are flushed out and fixed so hopefully we have a more manageable system going forward. If you care, participate in the bug days so that this change can be seamless:

https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Test_Day:2011-01-27_Network_Device_Naming_With_Biosdevname

Comment: Re:The N900. (Score 1) 359

by Bob Loblaw (#34777650) Attached to: Smartphones For Text SSH Use Re-Revisited

The N900 is the way to go just for its flexibility:
- no complicated jail-breaking needed or fighting with upstream to keep control of your phone's internals
- can install a full Openssh stack or the lighter Dropbear if you don't need all features
- several VNC clients available
- full non-crippled browser
- custom kernel available enabling various networking and filesystem modules
- great contact manager with great VOIP connectivity (gtalk/SIP/Skype all even though 3G)
- recently available custom wireless driver that allows full security testing (packet injection, full moitor mode, etc.)
- and many more ...

While the N900 might be a bit too much of a power tool for someone looking for a simple phone that works well, it is ideal for a technical person with Linux knowledge that can really take advantage of the wide-open underlying Linux base.

My only gripe with this phone is the battery life. You have to charge it every single day. Not a huge deal since it can charge from any USB port but still annoying on extended trips.

"But this one goes to eleven." -- Nigel Tufnel

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