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Comment: Version Control (Score 5, Insightful) 590

by BluePeppers (#33491374) Attached to: Programming Things I Wish I Knew Earlier

Put everything in version control. Everything. EVERYTHING!

Well. You could skip /home, but I know a roll back of /etc has saved me a couple of times on config upgrades.

Remember that once code is deleted, you can't get it back. However, version control changes that. Version control is one of the most vital tools for anyone developing/working with a computer.

Oh and git rocks and stuff :)

Comment: Re:Iceweasle (Score 1) 65

by BluePeppers (#31471804) Attached to: Mozilla Foundation Begins Redraft Process For MPL

I use archlinux, and I think it's called shireotoko by default. I've rebranded mine, using the firebrand script, but frankly... well I don't like to play up to trolls, but the point of my comment was that a lot of people find that particular clause rather annoying. If you wish to be a penickity git and tell me it's icecat, I couldn't care less :)

Input Devices

Will the Serial Console Ever Die? 460

Posted by kdawson
from the can-you-say-are-ess-two-three-two dept.
simpz writes "Will the serial port as a console connection ever be displaced — especially for devices such as switches, routers, SAN boxes, etc.? In one sense it's a simple connection. But it is the only current port that, in order to use, you need to know about wiring / baud rates / parity, etc. It has non-standard pinouts. And it is becoming too slow to upload firmware to dead devices, as the firmware updates get larger. Also, the serial port is rapidly disappearing from new laptops — which is where you often really need it, in data centers. Centronics, PS/2, and current loop are mostly defunct. Is there any sign on the horizon of a USB console connection?"
Operating Systems

Which Linux For Non-Techie Windows Users? 766

Posted by Soulskill
from the first-one's-free dept.
obarthelemy writes "Having at last gotten Linux to run satisfactorily on my own PCs, I'd now like to start transitioning friends and family from XP to Linux instead of Windows 7. The catch is that these guys don't understand or care much about computers, so the transition has to be as seamless and painless as possible. Actually, they won't care for new things; even the upcoming upgrade to Windows 7 would be a pain and a bother, which is a great opportunity for Linux. I'm not too concerned about software (most of them only need browser, IM, VLC, mail and a Powerpoint viewer for all those fascinating attachments). What I'm concerned about is OS look-and-feel and interface — system bar on the bottom with clock, trash, info on the right, menu on the left, menu items similar to those of Windows. Is it better to shoot for a very targeted distro? Which would you recommend? Are there themes/skins for mainstream distributions instead? I've been looking around the web, and it's hard to gauge which distros are well-done and reasonably active."
Idle

Directed Energy Weapon Downs Mosquitos 428

Posted by samzenpus
from the two-pound-hammer-and-ten-penny-nail dept.
wisebabo writes "Nathan Myhrvol demonstrated at TED a laser, built from parts scrounged from eBay, capable of shooting down not one but 50 to 100 mosquitos a second. The system is 'so precise that it can specify the species, and even the gender, of the mosquito being targeted.' Currently, for the sake of efficiency, it leaves the males alone because only females are bloodsuckers. Best of all the system could cost as little as $50. Maybe that's too expensive for use in preventing malaria in Africa but I'd buy one in a second!" We ran a story about this last year. It looks like the company has added a bit more polish, and burning mosquito footage to their marketing.

+ - Goofle investigating Chinese employees->

Submitted by BluePeppers
BluePeppers (1596987) writes "The Guardian is reporting that Google China is investigating it's staff in lieu of The Incident. ""We're not commenting on rumour and speculation. This is an ongoing investigation and we simply cannot comment on the details," a Google spokeswoman said. Security analysts told Reuters the malicious software or malware used in the attack was a modification of a trojan called Hydraq. A trojan is a hidden program allowing unauthorised access to a computer. The analysts said the sophistication in the attack was in knowing whom to attack, not the malware itself.""
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