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Video Sigsense is Making Interchangeable, Modular Sensors (Video) 21

Their main claim: "Sigsense Sensors are field-switchable sensing modules which replace the current generation of single purpose instruments. All Sigsense Sensors connect to the Sigsense Wireless Dock through a common interface. This portability and convenience allows workers to always carry the right instrument for the job." In other words, a technician in a food manufacturing plant doesn't need to carry a humidity-measuring tool, a multimeter, a signal strength meter, and four or five other measuring tools, to the point where he's got a backpack full of instrumentation or a rolling a cart full of measuring devices. That technician can now (in theory) carry a single, wireless sensor body, and put the sensors he needs on it as easily as you change heads on an electric hair trimmer. Check their blurb on AngelList for more about what this company is up to, and note that they are going way beyond making one measurement at a time. They're talking about collecting instrument data, along with tracking technicians, and sending all this data to the cloud, where you can do with it as you wish. But not today. The website says they will have products available "soon." (Alternate Video Link)

Comment Re:OMFG compile! (Score 1) 113

As someone who has worked on a Linux-based embedded system, and had to cross-compile to do it... dude, Linux cross-compilation sucks, and there's almost universal pushback from everyone wo deals with Linux build systems, from Debian to Red Hat, and beyond, to any attempts to make it better.

Did you try OpenEmbedded / the Yocto Project? It takes away pretty much all of the pain of cross-compilation. Most of our users seem pretty happy with it.


Linux 3.14 Kernel Released 132

An anonymous reader writes "The Linux 3.14 "Shuffling Zombie Juror" kernel has been released. Significant improvements to Linux 3.14 include the mainlining of SCHED_DEADLINE, stable support for Intel Broadwell CPU graphics, Xen PVH support, stable support for ZRAM, and many other additions. There's also a tentative feature list on"
Social Networks

Startup Out of MIT Promises Digital Afterlife — Just Hand Over Your Data 241

v3rgEz writes "A new startup out of MIT offers early adopters a chance at the afterlife, of sorts: It promises to build an AI representation of the dearly departed based on chat logs, email, Facebook, and other digital exhaust generated over the years. " generates a virtual YOU, an avatar that emulates your personality and can interact with, and offer information and advice to your family and friends after you pass away," the team promises. But can a chat bot plus big data really produce anything beyond a creepy, awkward facsimile?"

The Academy For Software Engineering: a High School For Developers 56

rjmarvin writes "The Academy for Software Engineering, right off of Manhattan's Union Square, is in its second year of educating students for a future in computer science and software engineering. No entrance exams, no admission standards, just an opportunity for any student interested in software to take specialized classes like robotics and programming, go on trips to companies like Google and Facebook, and spend summers interning at Morgan Stanley and JPMorgan Chase before heading to college and into the workforce, powering the next wave of innovation as members of the tech workforce in New York's burgeoning 'Silicon Alley.'"

Submission 'I'm the Guy Who Sent out the $12.50 Yahoo T-Shirt'

Hugh Pickens DOT Com writes: Ramses Martinez, Director of Yahoo Paranoids, writes that he's the guy who runs the Yahoo team that works with the security community on issues and vulnerabilities and it's been an interesting 36 hours since the story first appeared on slashdot. "Here’s the story. When I first took over the team that works with the security community on issues and vulnerabilities, we didn’t have a formal process to recognize and reward people who sent issues to us. We were very fast to remedy issues but didn’t have anything formal for thanking people that sent them in." Martinez started sending a t-shirt as a personal “thanks.” It wasn’t a policy, he just just thought it would be nice to do. But Yahoo recently decided to improve the process of vulnerability reporting. The “send a t-shirt” idea needed an upgrade. Yahoo will now reward individuals and firms that identify what we classify as new, unique and/or high risk issues between $150 — $15,000. The amount will be determined by a clear system based on a set of defined elements that capture the severity of the issue. " If you submitted something to us and we responded with an acknowledgment (and probably a t-shirt) after July 1st, we will reconnect with you about this new program. This includes, of course, a check for the researchers at High-Tech Bridge who didn’t like my t-shirt."