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Linux

Linux 3.14 Kernel Released 132

Posted by samzenpus
from the get-it-while-it's-hot dept.
An anonymous reader writes "The Linux 3.14 "Shuffling Zombie Juror" kernel has been released. Significant improvements to Linux 3.14 include the mainlining of SCHED_DEADLINE, stable support for Intel Broadwell CPU graphics, Xen PVH support, stable support for ZRAM, and many other additions. There's also a tentative feature list on KernelNewbies.org."
Social Networks

Startup Out of MIT Promises Digital Afterlife — Just Hand Over Your Data 241

Posted by timothy
from the ashes-to-ashes-dust-to-nsa dept.
v3rgEz writes "A new startup out of MIT offers early adopters a chance at the afterlife, of sorts: It promises to build an AI representation of the dearly departed based on chat logs, email, Facebook, and other digital exhaust generated over the years. "Eterni.me generates a virtual YOU, an avatar that emulates your personality and can interact with, and offer information and advice to your family and friends after you pass away," the team promises. But can a chat bot plus big data really produce anything beyond a creepy, awkward facsimile?"
Programming

The Academy For Software Engineering: a High School For Developers 56

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the start-'em-young dept.
rjmarvin writes "The Academy for Software Engineering, right off of Manhattan's Union Square, is in its second year of educating students for a future in computer science and software engineering. No entrance exams, no admission standards, just an opportunity for any student interested in software to take specialized classes like robotics and programming, go on trips to companies like Google and Facebook, and spend summers interning at Morgan Stanley and JPMorgan Chase before heading to college and into the workforce, powering the next wave of innovation as members of the tech workforce in New York's burgeoning 'Silicon Alley.'"

+ - 'I'm the Guy Who Sent out the $12.50 Yahoo T-Shirt'

Submitted by Hugh Pickens DOT Com
Hugh Pickens DOT Com (2995471) writes "Ramses Martinez, Director of Yahoo Paranoids, writes that he's the guy who runs the Yahoo team that works with the security community on issues and vulnerabilities and it's been an interesting 36 hours since the story first appeared on slashdot. "Here’s the story. When I first took over the team that works with the security community on issues and vulnerabilities, we didn’t have a formal process to recognize and reward people who sent issues to us. We were very fast to remedy issues but didn’t have anything formal for thanking people that sent them in." Martinez started sending a t-shirt as a personal “thanks.” It wasn’t a policy, he just just thought it would be nice to do. But Yahoo recently decided to improve the process of vulnerability reporting. The “send a t-shirt” idea needed an upgrade. Yahoo will now reward individuals and firms that identify what we classify as new, unique and/or high risk issues between $150 — $15,000. The amount will be determined by a clear system based on a set of defined elements that capture the severity of the issue. " If you submitted something to us and we responded with an acknowledgment (and probably a t-shirt) after July 1st, we will reconnect with you about this new program. This includes, of course, a check for the researchers at High-Tech Bridge who didn’t like my t-shirt.""
Patents

Rackspace Goes On Rampage Against Patent Trolls 132

Posted by timothy
from the there-should-be-blood dept.
girlmad writes "Rackspace has come out fighting against one of the U.S.'s most notorious patent trolls, Parallel Iron. The cloud services firm said it's totally fed up with trolls of all kinds, which have caused a 500 percent rise in its legal bills. Rackspace was last week named among 12 firms accused of infringing Parallel Iron's Hadoop Distributed File System patents. Rackspace is now counter-suing the troll, as the firm said it has a deal in place with Parallel Iron after signing a previous patent settlement with them."
Network

You Can Navigate Between Any Two Websites In 19 Clicks Or Fewer 185

Posted by Soulskill
from the too-close-for-comfort dept.
An anonymous reader writes "A study done by a Hungarian physicist found that of the billions of websites and over a trillion objects on the web, any given two are separated by no more than 19 clicks. 'Distributed across the entire web, though, are a minority of pages—search engines, indexes and aggregators—that are very highly connected and can be used to move from area of the web to another. These nodes serve as the "Kevin Bacons" of the web, allowing users to navigate from most areas to most others in less than 19 clicks. Barabási credits this "small world" of the web to human nature—the fact that we tend to group into communities, whether in real life or the virtual world. The pages of the web aren't linked randomly, he says: They're organized in an interconnected hierarchy of organizational themes, including region, country and subject area. Interestingly, this means that no matter how large the web grows, the same interconnectedness will rule.'"

Administration: An ingenious abstraction in politics, designed to receive the kicks and cuffs due to the premier or president. -- Ambrose Bierce

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