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Comment: Re: "There is a problem with the law, so ban scien (Score 1) 180

Better to have robots fight than people. Also once we have a lot of machine control APIs it won't be hard to make killer robots. I can make a paintball gun that shoots everyone but myself using a computer, a couple of high powered servos, a linear actuator, two cameras, and IBM's machine vision API. The fundamental technology just needs to be repurposed, so you're never going to stop the threat of killer machines.

Comment: Tablet-PC hybrids show a lot of promise. (Score 1) 333

by BlueKitties (#46901765) Attached to: Figuring Out the iPad's Place
I owned an iPad 2 since its launch, about three months ago someone broke into my house and stole it (among other things.) I decided it was time to go shopping, and finally settled on a first generation Surface Pro.

After using it for three months, I can say I prefer it over my laptop *and* my iPad. When I want to develop software, I switch to the desktop and plug in an external monitor (which means I get a second 10-inch screen to load documentation or whatever.) When I want to browse casually, I just unplug it from the extra monitor and go mobile. I don't like the screen aspect ratio (too tall and skinny in portrait) and the battery life needs work. It's also a bit heavy, and the app store isn't as rich.

Still, it has been incredibly nice to have access to my desktop and tablet all in one package. As a desktop, it's actually pretty solid. I don't do heavy media editing (most of my software development involves financial accounts) so it hasn't so much as hiccuped with what I've thrown at it. Now, I don't feel like the Surface Pro is better than an iPad as a tablet, though it's a solid desktop and a decent tablet. Still, having my desktop in such a small form factor has been a dream.

It feels like the natural progression if technology. When someone gets the hybrid-OS to work right, I could see desktops, laptops, phones, and tablets all becoming the same product in a way.

Comment: Re:April Fools stories are gay (Score 1) 1482

by BlueKitties (#46645527) Attached to: OKCupid Warns Off Mozilla Firefox Users Over Gay Rights
Lets not mince words; These "activists" want the man fired over his private political views. That's what this is about: They want heads to roll, they want someone to lose their job over a private donation. That is hateful bologna. It is sick and wrong to try to get someone fired over something like that.

Comment: Re:April Fools stories are gay (Score 1) 1482

by BlueKitties (#46636189) Attached to: OKCupid Warns Off Mozilla Firefox Users Over Gay Rights
If a company axed a low level employee for donating to a pro-gay campaign, people would crap a collective brick at the prospect of firing an employee over their private political actions. This isn't about criticizing someone for their views, this is about actively trying to get someone fired over their private, away-from-work political actions. That's wrong, and hateful. We try to ruin people's lives over a bad political choice or donation, we reason with them intelligently and kindly, with love and care. This whole "death to those who oppose pro-gay-legislation" is warped and wrong. Even gays I know are fed up with how hateful the pro-gay movement has become. Back, the hell, OFF. Your hate and cruelty is not making things better for gays.

Comment: Re:again with the assumptions. (Score 2) 108

by BlueKitties (#46307525) Attached to: Making Sure Our Lab Equipment Isn't Tricking Us
But the conspiring forces can't know what the quasars are sending off! That's the point. Nothing is capable of containing information pertaining to what the quasars have sent, because it's impossible to have made a round trip to find out ahead of time. Therefore, even if the forces can influence the scientist's choice of quasar, the mysterious force still has no idea which quasar will say what, so it can't rig the experiment.

As an analogy, imagine there are three settings: A, B, and C. The mysterious force wants to rig the experiment by forcing the scientist to select setting B. The scientist, to get around this, allows three quasars to select a setting. One of the quasars will pick A, one B, and one will select C. The scientist will then pick one of the quasars to set the settings. The mysterious force can choose which quasar the scientist will pick, but the mysterious force doesn't know which quasar will send which setting, therefore it can't force the scientist to pick B.

Comment: Re:again with the assumptions. (Score 2) 108

by BlueKitties (#46304315) Attached to: Making Sure Our Lab Equipment Isn't Tricking Us
All experimental evidence suggests that the transfer of information faster than the speed of light in a vacuum is impossible. Scientists understand full well that there is always a possibility some new discovery could upend even the most fundamental view of the universe, but until evidence to suggest otherwise comes along, scientists can only work with the experimental data they have -- and so far, all of that suggests FTL transfer of information is impossible.

Therefore, drawing from the incredible amount of experimental data, it is reasonable to conclude that such stars could not have conspired with phenomenon on Earth, since the information would need to have left Earth, reached the star, then returned. The universe simply isn't old enough for such a round trip to have happened. If the max speed you can travel is 1,000 miles in an hour, and the universe is one hour old, then it is impossible to make a round trip to a destination 1,000 miles away. Therefore, if someone arrives from that destination, we know it is impossible for them to have conspired with someone from where you are at, since such a round trip would have taken at least two hours, and the universe is only one hour old.

Comment: Re:3d-printed-exoskeleton LINER (Score 2) 41

by BlueKitties (#46291233) Attached to: Paralyzed Woman Walks Again With 3D-Printed Robotic Exoskeleton
This isn't entirely accurate. The 3D printing is important because it enabled a custom tailored design which prevents injury. Hence the "more fluid components" were 3D printed -- They just scan the person, and the computer prints an appropriately fitting shell. This is a major boon, since otherwise engineers would need to create custom molds everytime a new shaped leg came into the office.

Comment: Re:Third-rate devices (Score 1) 141

by BlueKitties (#46287813) Attached to: Two Ubuntu Phones Coming In 2014, Aiming For Top 50 iOS/Android Apps
My first Android device was a G1. Honestly, it was junk. The iPhone of the day blew it out of the water. It served as a showcase in the broader market for what Android could do, and helped Google gather real world usage data. This is arguably a "public beta" of sorts, from a development perspective.

Comment: I think most of us figured this one out already. (Score 1) 37

by BlueKitties (#46267781) Attached to: Facebook Analyzes the Impact of Love On Their Business
There's always "those two" who start posting on each other's walls, obviously as just an excuse to chat, and then when they finally hookup they stop posting because they're too busy making out. Usually the Facebook mingling accelerates slowly -- The guy posts, the girl responds (or doesn't respond, so the guy takes a hint.) Etc. When marriage finally ensues, and the two live together, they leave Facebook almost entirely. Of course this is a reflection of the general social behavior of people. When we're young, we mingle with a lot of people until we find a mate, then drop out of the social sphere partially or fully. I've long suspected the highly social nature of teenagers and young adults is (partially) a social function to find romance, even if it's unintentional. Most people who have ran in various social circles will find there's some pseudodating within coed friend groups, where one pair will spend a bit more time with each other, which then either escalates into a real relationship, or the peliminary psuedodating fails and never progresses to real dating -- I.e. they start "posting on each others walls" a lot, until they drop out of the social circle (Facebook.)

It is surely a great calamity for a human being to have no obsessions. - Robert Bly

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