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The Almighty Buck

How a Programmer Gets By On $16K/Yr: He Moves to Malaysia 523

Posted by timothy
from the wouldn't-be-for-everyone dept.
An anonymous reader writes "If you can make $10 and hour doing remote work, you can afford to live in Malysia. Make it $15 or $20, you can work 30 hours a week. Real money? Make it ten. This article talks about how John Hunter did it." Malaysia's not the only destination for self-motivated ex-pat programmers, of course. If you've considered doing this kind of sabbatical, or actually have, please explain in the comments the from-where-to-where details and reasons.
Mars

NASA: Curiosity Has Found Plastic On Mars 293

Posted by samzenpus
from the mars-needs-organic-polymers dept.
dsinc writes "Last week Curiosity was able to use its SAM (Sample Analysis at Mars) device to confirm the discovery. A robotic arm with a complex system of Spectral Analysis devices was able to vaporize and identify gasses from the sample, concluding that it is in fact plastic. How plastic formed or ended up on the Martian surface is quite an exciting mystery that sparks many questions. The type of plastic sampled as we know so far can only be formed using petrochemicals, meaning not only that there could possibly be a source of oil on the Red Planet, but that somehow it got turned into plastic. Even more interesting is that oil or petrochemicals used to create this type of plastic are only known to come from ancient fossilized organic materials, such as zooplankton and algae, which geochemical processes convert into oil pointing to the earthshaking evidence that there was once life on mars. 'Right now we have multiple working hypotheses, and each hypothesis makes certain predictions about things like what the spherules are made of and how they are distributed,' said Curiosity's principal investigator, Steve Squyres, of Cornell University. 'Our job as we explore Matijevic Hill in the months ahead will be to make the observations that will let us test all the hypotheses carefully, and find the one that best fits the observations.'" Update: Yes, it's a hoax
Iphone

+ - Apple Acknowledges Major iPhone 5 Camera Flaw 1

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Many iPhone 5 users are complaining that its camera is adding a purple flare to their photos. Speculation is that it's caused by the new sapphire lens cover that Apple touted as "thinner and more durable than standard glass with the ability to provide crystal clear images." Apple's response to those who've complained? "You're using it wrong.""
Unix

+ - Experimental, Python-powered Shell Released->

Submitted by
JonathansCorner.com
JonathansCorner.com writes "An experimental Unix/Linux command line shell, implemented in Python 3, that offers Unix strength while taking advantage of some more recent concepts in terms of usability and searching above pinpointing files in heirarchies. Nothing here is the last word, but it suggests some very interesting things to consider for the standard shells."
Link to Original Source
Mars

+ - Weather on Mars surprisingly pleasant, Curiosity rover finds Read more: http://->

Submitted by
hessian
hessian writes "Curiosity's onboard weather station, which is called the Remote Environment Monitoring Station (REMS), has measured air temperatures as high as 43 degrees Fahrenheit (6 degrees Celsius) in the afternoon. And temperatures have climbed above freezing during more than half of the Martian days, or sols, since REMS was turned on, scientists said.

These measurements are a bit unexpected, since it's still late winter at Gale Crater, the spot 4.5 degrees south of the Martian equator where Curiosity touched down on Aug. 5.

"That we are seeing temperatures this warm already during the day is a surprise and very interesting," Felipe Gómez, of the Centro de Astrobiología in Madrid, said in a statement."

Link to Original Source

+ - SHA-3 winner announced->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has just announced the winner of the SHA-3 competition: Keccak, created by Guido Bertoni, Joan Daemen and Gilles Van Assche of STMicroelectronics and Michaël Peeters of NXP Semiconductors.

“Keccak has the added advantage of not being vulnerable in the same ways SHA-2 might be,” says NIST computer security expert Tim Polk. “An attack that could work on SHA-2 most likely would not work on Keccak because the two algorithms are designed so differently.”

For Joan Daemen it must be a "two in a row" feeling, since he also is one of the authors of AES."

Link to Original Source

+ - Weaponized radiation testing from 1950 to 1970 in St Louis discovered->

Submitted by
filekutter
filekutter writes "Quote from paper: "This piece analyzes a covert Manhattan Project spin-off organization referred to here as
the Manhattan-Rochester Coalition, and an obscure aerosol study in St. Louis, Missouri,
conducted under contract by the U.S. military from 1953-1954, and 1963-1965. The military-
sponsored studies targeted a segregated, high-density urban area..."
Link to research paper:http://gradworks.umi.com/35/15/3515886.html"

Link to Original Source
Security

+ - Graphics Cards: The Future of Online Authentication?->

Submitted by Gunkerty Jeb
Gunkerty Jeb (1950964) writes "Researchers working on the "physically unclonable functions found in standard PC components (PUFFIN) project" announced last week that widely used graphics processors could be the next step in online authentication. The project seeks to find uniquely identifiable characteristics of hardware in common computers, mobile devices, laptops and consumer electronics.

The researchers realized that apparently identical graphics processors are actually different in subtle, unforgeable ways. A piece of software developed by the researchers is capable of discerning these fine differences. The order of magnitude of these differences is so minute, in fact, that manufacturing equipment is incapable of manipulating or replicating them. Thus, the fine-grained manufacturing differences can act as a sort of a key to reliably distinguish each of the processors from one another.

The implication of this discovery is that such differences can be used as physically unclonable features to securely link the graphics cards, and by extension, the computers in which they reside and the persons using them, to specific online accounts."

Link to Original Source

I have never seen anything fill up a vacuum so fast and still suck. -- Rob Pike, on X.

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