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Comment: Re:science doesn't have the answer... (Score 2) 133

by Black.Shuck (#49499423) Attached to: The Origin of the First Light In the Universe

Science isn't supposed to "have answers". The premise of a scientific theory is twofold:

1. It must "work" given certain conditions.
2. It must be able to be proved NOT to work outside of those conditions.

Science says nothing about rights and wrongs, just whether things work or not within certain measurable parameters.

Premise 2 is important. If you can't say what will make your theory break, then it's not clear you're really saying anything at all.

Mars

Road To Mars: Solving the Isolation Problem 137

Posted by Soulskill
from the cryostasis-is-not-just-for-sci-fi-and-weekly-meetings dept.
An anonymous reader writes: As space technology matures, new missions are being funded and humanity is setting its goals ever further. Space agencies are tackling some of the new problems that crop up when we try to go further away than Earth's moon. This New Yorker article takes a look at research into one of the biggest obstacles: extended isolation. Research consultant Jack Stuster once wrote, "Future space expeditions will resemble sea voyages much more than test flights, which have served as the models for all previous space missions." Long-duration experiments are underway to test the effects of isolation, but it's tough to study. You need many experiments to derive useful conclusions, but you can't just ship 100 groups of a half-dozen people off to remote areas of the globe and monitor all of them. It's also borderline unethical to expose the test subjects to the kind of stress and danger that would be present in a real Mars mission. The data collected so far has been (mostly) promising, but we have a long way to go. The technology and the missions themselves will probably come together long before we know how to deal with isolation. At some point, we'll just have to hope our best guess is good enough.
Software

Developers and the Fear of Apple 269

Posted by Soulskill
from the think-different-except-about-us dept.
An anonymous reader writes: UI designer Eli Schiff has posted an article about the "climate of fear" surrounding Apple in the software development community. He points out how developers who express criticism in an informal setting often recant when their words are being recorded, and how even moderate public criticism is often prefaced by flattery and endorsements.

Beyond that, the industry has learned that they can't rely on Apple's walled garden to make a profit. The opaque app review process, the race to the bottom on pricing, and Apple's resistance to curation of the App Store are driving "independent app developers into larger organizations and venture-backed startups." Apple is also known to cut contact with developers if they release for Android first. The "climate of fear" even affects journalists, who face not only stonewalling from Apple after negative reporting, but also a brigade of Apple fans and even other journalists trying to paint them as anti-Apple.

Comment: Re:The solution is obvious (Score 5, Insightful) 579

how is apple able to upgrade their phones for like 5 years and Scamsung, LG and HTC cannot?

Apple is comparatively disciplined, releasing about one new phone a year, and hardware and software are under their full control.

Together, the others release dozens, and different companies share different responsibilities. Nice for consumer choice, but not so nice for support, since nobody wants to maintain a software stack nor wrestle with the politics involved in updating so many different devices.

Comment: Will Ripple Eclipse Bitcoin? (Score 5, Insightful) 144

by Black.Shuck (#48627057) Attached to: Will Ripple Eclipse Bitcoin?

...let's see:

Strictly speaking, Ripple isn't the name of the digital currency

So it's not actually a real competitor to Bitcoin. How about a look at the Wikipedia page:

It is not recommended for a user to grant trust to other parties unless the user fully understands the ramifications.

It is not recommended for a user to allow rippling unless they fully understand the ramifications.

At best, it's not competing with BC in the first place, and at worst it sounds too complex for consumers to get their heads around.

So I guess the answer to the original question is a resounding "no", but Betterage could have told you that.

fortune: cannot execute. Out of cookies.

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