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Comment: Re:needs some (Score 1) 470

by Black Parrot (#46673719) Attached to: It's Time To Bring Pseudoscience Into the Science Classroom

Really if you want to see pseudoscience in action take a good look at all the assumptions behind cosmology and astronomy. Redshift = distance is an ASSUMPTION and Edwin Hubble himself was the first to point that out. Or start being honest enough to teach students that LOTS of biologists as well as physicists like Sir Hoyle have valid doubts about the theory of evolution, and no they are not creationists. Their main problem with evolution being that it is so often presented as settled established fact when it really has a lot of serious problems that need to be worked out. Just saying that is some kind of heresy in most English-speaking areas. Truth is many scientists would love to replace evolution with a better theory.

Every hypothesis is "an assumption". But some stand up to scrutiny and offer a lot of explanatory value.

As for evolution, what you said isn't heresy - it's a claim that you didn't try to back up.

Comment: Re:needs some (Score 2) 470

by Black Parrot (#46673711) Attached to: It's Time To Bring Pseudoscience Into the Science Classroom

Roughly one in three American adults believes in telepathy, ghosts, and extrasensory perception," wrote a trio of scientists in a 2012 issue of the Astronomy Education Review.

Yes we must use government institutions to regulate what people believe! If we start young we can change the next generation.

That's one spin you could put on it.

Another choice is "How is a country full of people that believe nonsense going to survive the 21st Century?"

Comment: Re:The Religious Right will have your head on a pl (Score 1) 470

by Black Parrot (#46673653) Attached to: It's Time To Bring Pseudoscience Into the Science Classroom

There is a great deal of pseudoscience belief on both sides of the isle. The left has irrational beliefs on nuclear power, GMO foods, etc.

You're trying to pee in the punch with a "both sides do it" argument. The not-so-subtle difference is that "the left" doesn't deny that nuclear power and GM foods exist. To paraphrase the famous saying, everyone is entitled to their own policy opinions, but not to their own realities.

But then the Republicans aren't generally as bad as they get a rap for. Their only substantial reality-denying party positions are on evolution and global warming, and both of those are for easily understandable political reasons (the former too keep the dwindling numbers of the faithful faithful, the latter to please their corporate masters).

Comment: Re:Headline writing (Score 1) 103

by Black Parrot (#46560005) Attached to: French, Chinese Satellite Images May Show Malaysian Jet Debris

It''s called "telegraphic speech", as if the writer didn't want to pay for the extra characters.

Newspapers do it for space: the bigger the typeface, the less room for text.

I suspect it carries over to internet articles because of cognitive side-effects: if every headline was a complete sentence they would take more effort on the readers' part. You want something that will instantly grab (or lose) a reader's attention without any mental effort on their part.

(Look at how many people don't RTFA, or even RTFSummary. Full sentences would lead to people who don't even RTFHeadline.)

However, telegraphic speech can cause problems for readers.

Comment: Re:Great Headline (Score 1) 103

by Black Parrot (#46559909) Attached to: French, Chinese Satellite Images May Show Malaysian Jet Debris

Mod up pleeze. This story has turned into the orgy that fuels the spree US media wants to be.

They were hoping a little blonde girl would be kidnapped or murdered, but they had to settle for a missing airplane mostly full of foreigners.

And with it missing at sea, they can't even pose a teddy bear in photos of the wreckage.

Thus mathematics may be defined as the subject in which we never know what we are talking about, nor whether what we are saying is true. -- Bertrand Russell

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