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Journal Journal: Trump - a warning from the present 8

I don't believe for a second Trump believes a word he's saying.

What I am concerned about is that Trump could, very realistically, be elected because of the views he's espousing. That says something terrible about too many people at the moment, and also makes possible the frightening scenario whereby someone who believes what Trump is currently saying could be elected too.

In the mean time, Trump is also validating the opinions of many extremists.


Journal Journal: Capituation 17

Just a rather obvious observation that nobody seems willing to make. Responding to a terrorist event by banning people who are trying to escape those terrorists does not hurt the terrorists in the slightest. It's actually what they want.

And giving terrorists what they want generally doesn't stop terrorism.

The Military

Journal Journal: There's a reason it's called Terrorism, not Endofcivilizationism. 30

For the next few days, weeks, months, the usual suspects will channel their fears and hatred towards both those who murdered in France two days ago, and those who disagree with them on how to tackle it. They'll whip themselves up into a hatred-filled frenzy against those who are unfortunate enough to share the same religion as the terrorists, and they'll blow the "threat" up out of all proportion.

These people are simply stupid. Don't get angry at them, ignore them. They're victims of terrorism in its purest sense - they're the people shitting their pants at what just transpired, in a way nobody in Paris, New York, or London is doing, or will do. They're weak, scared, and pathetic, and they're lashing out at everyone from ordinary Muslims to Liberals because ISIL just played them like a violin.

Tomorrow is another day. It'll be like Tuesday of last week, except there'll be 150 or so fewer people to enjoy it thanks to a group of religious extremists who represent nobody but themselves. We'll miss those who are gone, but life goes on. Dealing with those who cause such horrors involves reason and human decency. ISIL's plan involves us having neither. Their success requires we have neither.

But we're better than they are.


Journal Journal: Pale Moon

I broke down and installed Pale Moon as my default browser. For those who haven't heard of it, it's Firefox 3.x with updates.

Comments so far? Well, it seems snappy, but then most browsers do if they don't have any crud from a year's worth of browsing sessions. Compatability looks OK. Memory usage is not off the wall but not awesome either - I've suspected for a while that the out-of-control memory usage of Firefox has more to do with how Javascript is being used these days than anything Firefox itself is doing.


Journal Journal: Media bias 8

It has to be said, in defence of the whole "Lieberal media" nonsense, that the media has been telling a lot of lies about Ben Carson recently, albeit most of which sourced from his autobiography.


Journal Journal: No President Lessig 3

So Larry's dropped out of the race. This is because the Democratic Party are totally unfair, because they said someone needs to have more than 1% of the vote for a slightly more sustained period of time than Lessig could manage.

In other words, the Democratic Party didn't want to waste anyone's time with clear no-hopers who were only running to use their debates and a convention as a platform.

I'm with the Democratic Party on this, for two reasons. One is I agree with them. The other is quite simply that tech does not currently deserve a place in polite society when it comes to discussing the major social issues of our time.

If we're still throwing tantrums in 2015 because we can't call Anita Sarkeesian the C-word on a Go language mailing list, then as an industry we need some deep introspection, and we need to ask ourselves why the hell such a small band of lucky, privileged, individuals as ourselves (we're overpaid for work we love, be honest) are fundamentally incapable of dealing with people less fortunate than ourselves.

Lessig is the only Democratic Party candidate worthy of having his speeches interrupted by BLM. That's how terrible we are.

User Journal

Journal Journal: Pet Peeves of the Job Search

- Pushy recruiters with foreign accents so thick you can't understand what they are saying
- Who clearly have not read your resume and only found you on a keyword search
- Who cannot read a map and do not understand "I cannot relocate 500 miles for a temporary job, and in software, all jobs are temporary"


Journal Journal: Bye Biden 1

I don't think it's a coincidence that Biden's announced he'll not be running immediately after two polls suggesting that the pundits, not the loudest Internet critics, were apparently right about who "won" last week's debate. As I've said, I think Biden was solely hanging around to handle the chance Clinton would lose to Sanders. That... doesn't appear to be happening.

Maybe it's too early to tell, but I really don't buy a Sanders victory. Although I'm tempted to get the HD DVD journal entry out just to use its awesome power to upset the status quo.


No that would be wrong. With great power comes great responsibility. If it were important that Sanders win, I would consider it. But it is not. Sorry Berniphiles, but we need something better than the Democrats answer to Ron Effing Paul.

User Journal

Journal Journal: So who won the debate? (Updated: Clinton) 1

Update Oct 20th 2015: No serious answers from you people, but it appears at any rate to be Clinton who won the debate. Most votes are coming at Biden's expense (and Biden isn't even running) but Sanders is essentially treading water at this point.

Media consensus: Hills.
Internet consensus and every single poll: The Bern.

Anyone who actually watched it have an opinion?

User Journal

Journal Journal: Knowledge Transfer Time 11

What is your favorite Data Modeling Software that interfaces with SQL Server?

It looks like Microsoft has dropped Visio for Enterprise Architects, which is what I used the last time I had to do a massive knowledge transfer of a data heavy application.

United States

Journal Journal: The other car 11

President Clinton - GWB's fifth term. The continuation of everything from the partisan insanity to the continuation of the post-9/11 war-on-humanity. Rating: *OHMYHELL*.

President Sanders - the establishment isn't going to let this happen unless it somehow becomes extremely difficult to stop him AND the Republicans put up either Rand Paul or Donald Trump. Pretty much anyone else from the Republicans, even a deranged religious nutcase, will result in "something" happening to Sanders, be it an invented scandal or an assassination. If he ever makes it into office (thanks Trump) then he'll be cut off politically pretty early on and won't get a second term. *OHWELL*

President Biden - the best we can hope for (which is a terrible thing to say, I guess, but at least Biden has a certain amount of respect from both sides, but I don't see him stopping the post-9/11 thing), but let's be honest, it's getting a little late for him to jump on board even if Clinton starts to falter. *OHWELL*

Me, I'll probably vote Sanders or Biden. At least the latter likes passenger trains.


Journal Journal: So... Windows 10 1

The supposed pattern of Windows releases is similar to Star Trek movies, bad, good, bad, good. This doesn't make a lot of sense, I mean, Windows 1 was innovative but not exactly going to set the world on fire. Windows 2 was better, but again wasn't going to set the world on fire. Windows 3 was an incremental improvement on Windows 2 (largely code clean up, some minor fixes such as Program Manager) and, uh, set the world on Fire.

OK, fast forward. There's 95 (Yay), 98 (Boo.. . wait, yay.), Me (Booo), XP (Yay though I don't know why, I personally couldn't stand it), Vista (Booo), 7 (Yay), and...

OK, there really isn't a pattern there is there?

OK, OK, get on with it:

So, anyway, people have been saying "Well, 8 was a dud, therefore 10 will great and set the world on fire."

Is it me, or is Windows 10 a slow bug ridden piece of crap that's actually more like Vista was to XP than Windows 7 to Windows Vista?

Windows 8.x wasn't perfect. But it wasn't slow. It was relatively stable, not as stable as 7, but for the most part stable. The only problem with it (which admittedly was huge) was the lack of a Start menu.

Windows 10 seems ambitious, but it's ambitious in a Vista way, and I think they released it way too early and didn't really care about the consequences of half their decisions. My tablet crashes (rebooting) periodically, it didn't before. The laptop I've been trying it on is chronically slow, so slow I can boot up my Ubuntu laptop in the time it takes to get the lock screen to start recognizing key strokes after I've unsuspended it.

The features of 10 are hit and miss, with some, such as Cortana, being very impressive and completely useless, and others being a giant step back on what we had before. Mobile Office seems decent, albeit buggy. Mail will be excellent when it's finished and the numerous bugs are squished (same for other bundled groupware apps.) Edge appears to only exist because "Internet Explorer" had a bad reputation, but it's hardly feature complete, and to make sure we use it, we Windows 8.x tablet users lost our actually-pretty-good (and secure! No ActiveX!) version of IE for tablets. Why? Why remove that before you have the same features in Edge? And what about the extent to which many apps are reliant upon (unnecessary - I'm talking Freecell here!) network access and have been coded in such a way that they only start properly if the network is either completely turned off, or completely perfect?

There's the mandatory Windows Update nonsense. I can only imagine someone at Microsoft said "Nobody will complain, Android does that already, my Android phone is always downloading updates for apps", ignoring the fact that (1) Android isn't used on desktops, and (2) updating apps and even app infrastructure doesn't imply needing forced reboots. Hell, I regularly update my Ubuntu machine and virtually never reboot it, I don't need to, only updates to the kernel and X11 actually need reboots, and it's rare, if ever, that either absolutely 100% needs to be updated.

Couldn't Microsoft have just, you know, added the Start menu, and released that as Windows 8.2, and then held back on Windows 10 until they had a usable, stable, pleasant to use operating system? I know they were kinda in a panic, but the Start menu was literally the only thing anyone ever complained about with 8.x.

BTW I'm always wrong on these issues, so expect Windows 10 to be very popular with everyone lauding how great it is that Freecell will sit spinning at a Please wait screen because your laptop or tablet automatically connected to a coffee shop hotspot and is now waiting for you to log in.

User Journal

Journal Journal: Back to coding, doing something I haven't done before 6

Does anybody know of a good Javascript, .NET, or HTML5 (or combination of the three) library for doing a user-customizable widget grid?

I've seen it done enough that this *should* be a readily available control, but I don't seem to be able to find one with my first three rounds of google searching, I'm probably calling it the wrong thing.

What I want is to be able to configure a user's home page on the website with their choice & order of several widgets.

Anybody know of a great tool for doing this? Worst case scenario is I roll my own with a three column table built up from a sub table off of the users.

Oh yeah, and mandatory technology for this project is SQL Server Database, Visual Studio .NET Webforms (yeah, after doing MVC the last 4 projects I'm thinking Yuck too with these code-behinds), intended for HTML5 browsers.

The solution of this problem is trivial and is left as an exercise for the reader.