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Comment: Re: and... (Score 1) 270

by TheRaven64 (#49551027) Attached to: Tesla To Announce Battery-Based Energy Storage For Homes
It obviously can be done, the question is whether it makes financial sense. It seems that, if it were cost-efficient to store electricity in LiIon batteries then the biggest buyers of them would be power companies, so maybe there's some market inefficiency that you can exploit by doing it in customers houses, but it even with that it sounds like it will have a very long ROI. I pay about £400/year for electricity (about $600). A $13K battery storage array would cost me the same as almost 22 years of electricity. Even if it reduced my electricity bills to zero, it would take 22 years for it to pay for itself. I think the overnight rate, if I switch to a tariff that has one, is about half of the normal rate, so it would actually take 44 years. Probably a bit less as electricity prices are likely to go up over the next few decades, but even with a 20 year ROI there are far better uses of my money.

Comment: Re:UK ISPs cause DoS (Score 1) 134

by TheRaven64 (#49550163) Attached to: Pirate Bay Blockade Censors CloudFlare Customers
Lawsuits don't have to be expensive, it depends on how much you're asking. If you claim, say, the cost of one year of Internet subscription then you're in the lowest bracket for small claims court filings (plus your time, which may be a lot more depending on how flexible your working hours are). The cost for the ISP to send someone is more than they're likely to lose, so you're very likely to get a default judgement against them. For added irony, you might ask for the ISP to be required to pay for you to transfer your subscription to A&A and pay the difference in the cost of Internet access for the next two years...

Comment: Re:This never works (Score 3, Insightful) 281

by hairyfeet (#49548885) Attached to: Microsoft, Chip Makers Working On Hardware DRM For Windows 10 PCs

What he is talking about is DIVX (all caps), named to make people think of the OTHER DivX , which was an attempt at "DRM in a box" that went over about as well as a loud ripping fart in an elevator.

I predict other than the *philes (the same folks that bought Beta, Laserdisc, and anything else that claimed to be "better" than the rest) 4K is gonna flop as bad as 3D TV, the reasons why are numerous, 1.- DVD is "good enough" for the majority, which is why after all these years BD is still not a blip compared to the massive DVD install base, 2.- The bandwidth in the USA to stream 4K without getting capped? EXTREMELY rare, most folks would be lucky to be able to watch 2 vids before they get capped, 3.- The not insignificant investment from users that really like what 1080p looks like now, and 4.- The fact it won't work with anything they already have, thus causing the "I gotta buy the Beatles albums again" syndrome which in a "jobless recovery" isn't gonna fly.

Considering the majority of PCs still don't come with BD? I'm really not worried about 4K DRM, it'll be another WMA, only bitch is the wasted die space used by your GPU and/or board for this shit you'll never use. Damn, now I'm gonna have to grab that R9 270x before they have time to add that shit.

Comment: Re: SystemD added? (Score 3, Insightful) 458

by hairyfeet (#49547115) Attached to: Ubuntu 15.04 Released, First Version To Feature systemd

Uhhhh...yeah dude? The post he is referring to used "compartmentalized", "intrinsic" and "homogeneous" in less than 3 sentences....normal folks and IT guys? yeah they don't talk like that. So the poster is either 1.- A shill, or 2.- Works in PR or marketing, because those guys DO talk like that.

Frankly I was shocked he didn't roll out "synergy" but I think they wised onto it thanks to Dilbert ragging on it so many times.

Comment: Re:Missing data point. (Score 1) 337

by TheRaven64 (#49543949) Attached to: Median Age At Google Is 29, Says Age Discrimination Lawsuit
If you think architecture doesn't change much over time, then you haven't been paying attention to architecture. Lots of data structures from 10-15 years ago suck on modern hardware because of changes in the relative costs of cache and branch predictor misses, and that's just on a single machine. When you get into distributed systems then the relative speeds of networks and local storage have changed dramatically.

Comment: Re:That shouldn't surprise anyone (Score 1) 337

by TheRaven64 (#49543913) Attached to: Median Age At Google Is 29, Says Age Discrimination Lawsuit

There's one more reason, which is that there are sometimes good reasons for writing your own sort routine. Specifically, if you have data that has a known distribution that lets you beat a comparison sort. One of the questions I was asked in a Google interview was along these lines. The point was not to see how well I could write code on a whiteboard or reproduce an algorithm from a textbook, it was to see if I could understand that the problem wasn't the same as 'sort arbitrary data', see if I could extract what properties of the problem made it amenable to optimisation, and see what tools I had for approaching that kind of optimisation.

And sometimes it's not about knowing if you can reproduce an algorithm, but about knowing whether you understand the limitations of a particular approach. Do you understand when that off-the-shelf quicksort library would do a terrible job on certain input data? In one interview, I discovered that my interviewer didn't know about hopscotch hash tables, but did know about cuckoo hashing, so we ended up with a discussion about what the overheads of the two approaches are and when either would be better.

Comment: Re: Google: Select jurors who understand stats. (Score 1) 337

by TheRaven64 (#49543799) Attached to: Median Age At Google Is 29, Says Age Discrimination Lawsuit

People should be hired based on who is best for the job. Period.

If you have a mechanism for identifying, up front, who is best for a job requiring creativity and technical skill and is not subject to subconscious biases by interviewers then please let the rest of us know. I know a lot of companies that would be able to save huge amounts of money by replacing their hiring mechanisms with such a technique.

You can write a small letter to Grandma in the filename. -- Forbes Burkowski, CS, University of Washington

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