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Submission + - Intel buys into e-text books buys Kno

BigVig209 writes: "Intel Has Acquired Kno, Will Push Further Into The Education Content Market With Interactive Textbooks"
TechCrunch is reporting that Intel has purchased e-textbook publisher Kno for an undisclosed sum. (

According to a blog post by John Galvin, GM of Intel Education, "The acquisition of Kno boosts Intel’s global digital content library to more than 225,000 higher education and K-12 titles through existing partnerships with 75 educational publishers. Even more, the Kno platform provides administrators and teachers with the tools they need to easily assign, manage and monitor their digital learning content and assessments.

We’re looking forward to combining our expertise with Kno’s rich content so that together, we can help teachers create classroom environments and personalized learning experiences that lead to student success. Check out the Intel Education newsroom for ongoing updates from Intel." (

Submission + - FTC Strengthens Children's Privacy Protections Online (

An anonymous reader writes: The U.S. Federal Trade Commission today updated the privacy standards that protect children's privacy online. The new rules say companies must gain parental consent before collecting a kid's geolocation data, photos, and videos. It also broadened existing language to include third parties and companies that collect data on users across multiple websites. 'While the new rule strengthens such safeguards, it could also disrupt online advertising. Web sites and online advertising networks often use persistent identification systems — like a customer code number in a cookie in a person’s browser — to collect information about a user’s online activities and tailor ads for that person. But the new rule expands the definition of personal information to include persistent IDs — such as a customer code number, the unique serial number on a mobile phone, or the I.P. address of a browser — if they are used to show a child behavior-based ads.'

Submission + - Most Kickstarter Projects Fail to Deliver on Time 1

adeelarshad82 writes: A recently conducted analysis found that out of the top 50 most-funded Kickstarter projects, a whopping 84 percent missed their target delivery dates. As it turns out, only eight of them hit their deadline. Sixteen hadn't even shipped yet, while the remaining 26 projects left the warehouse months late.

Submission + - Broun: Evolution, big bang theory are "lies straight from the pit of hell" ( 1

BigVig209 writes: "Evolution and the big bang theory are “lies to keep me and all the folks who are taught that from understanding that they need a savior,” U.S. Rep. Paul Broun said in a recently released video.

In the video, taken from the 2012 Sportsman’s Banquet at Liberty Baptist Church in Hartwell, Broun also repeated fundamentalist Christian tenets that the Earth is less than 10,000 years old and the Holy Bible is a guidebook to every aspect of life."


Submission + - FTC Releases Google Privacy Audit, Blacks Out The Details (

chicksdaddy writes: "Google could tell you about its privacy practices except, well....they're private. That's the conclusion privacy advocates are drawing after the Federal Trade Commission took a black marker to an independent audit of the company's privacy practices before releasing it to the group EPIC in response to a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request.

Security Ledger is reporting that the FTC released a copy of a Price Waterhouse Coopers audit of Google that was mandated as part of a settlement with the FTC over complaints following a 2010 complaint by EPIC over privacy violations in Google Buzz, a now-defunct social networking experiment. However, the agency acceded to Google requests to redact descriptions of the search giant’s internal procedures and the design of its privacy program."

The Almighty Buck

Submission + - Russian hackers target the for profit and politics

BigVig209 writes: "The Chicago Tribune has an article (,0,5245524.story) about why younger Russian programmers are committing crimes online instead of getting lower paying, non-illicit jobs:

"Not long ago, the simple, anonymous thrill of exposing chinks in American software was enough of a payoff for a Russian hacker.

Today it's cash. And almost all the targets are in the United States and Europe, where Russia's notorious hackers pilfer online bank accounts, swipe social security numbers, steal credit card data and peek at e-mail log-ins and passwords as part of what some estimate to be a $100 billion-a-year global cyber-crime business.""

Going the speed of light is bad for your age.