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Comment: Re:Falsifiability is not optional for science (Score 1) 704

by BasilBrush (#47438843) Attached to: When Beliefs and Facts Collide

So you still have no evidence for your claim falsifiability s a necessary part of science. Let's face it, you know full well your claim was wrong.

Falsifiability is quite obviously the answer to the demarcation problem

That's Karl Popper's angle. Which does precisely zero to make it a part of the scientific method.

Comment: Re:Movies (Score 0) 105

by BasilBrush (#47438323) Attached to: FAA Pressures Coldwell, Other Realtors To Stop Using Drone Footage

You have your entire concept of liberty, and of the constitution, exactly backwards.

It;s clearly different from yours. But one could describe yours as being backwards just as easily as mine. It's simply a matter of perspective.

Should every new concept, innovation, invention, tool, technique, strategy, and technology be prohibited by default? What the hell is wrong with you?

What the hell is the matter with you, asking a question, and then assuming an answer. A WRONG answer.

No, I never said "every" anything. I said drones. Period.

Drones come into the category of the tragedy of the commons. Deli slicers don't. That being said for different reasons, there are plenty of regulations applying to deli slicers.

And in the case at hand, picture two people standing right next to each other. Each has their hands on the controls of a 4-pound plastic quadcopter carrying a GoPro.

Personally I'd say they were flying model aircraft not drones.

As to the distinction between private use and commercial use, this distinction applies in other areas too, such as using a car to take people where they ask. If you are doing it for free, or nothing more than fuel cost split, no problem. If you are doing it commercially then you tend to require a permit.

Comment: Re:that's not the FAA's job (Score 1) 105

by BasilBrush (#47438141) Attached to: FAA Pressures Coldwell, Other Realtors To Stop Using Drone Footage

What is the risk of a drone hovering 100 feet up taking photos of a house?

What's the risk of a box of electronics, possibly with cargo, falling out of the sky?

Just have the FAA issue $50 ADS-B transponders

Just? Will the system scale? And in what way will it stop faulty drones from falling out of the sky?

As far as heavy drones go - regulate them like baseballs hit into windows and such. You don't need a license to operate a baseball and yet we don't have them showering down on our cars all day long.

A drone carrying cargo is not like a baseball, and no amount of regulation will make it so.

Comment: Re:The death of the American dream (Score 0) 78

by BasilBrush (#47438107) Attached to: Lyft's New York Launch Halted By Restraining Order

The American dream was the idea

Yes, it was a dream or an idea. It was never a reality, never. It was simply a tale told by rich people to poor people to make them believe that their position as their own fault, rather than the exploitation it really was. A tale to get them to work hard for promise of rewards in the future which rarely transpire, rather than rewards now. A myth that the people with the money got it by working hard.

Comment: Re:Why are the number of cabs [artificially] limit (Score 1) 78

by BasilBrush (#47438073) Attached to: Lyft's New York Launch Halted By Restraining Order

So your argument against permitting people to hire their services is that it will threaten others' wages? Congratulations, you just cast your vote for no progress ever. Please move back into a cave, and give up your PC.

There was no logic in that statement whatsoever.

Comment: Re:Why are the number of cabs [artificially] limit (Score 1) 78

by BasilBrush (#47438065) Attached to: Lyft's New York Launch Halted By Restraining Order

I'm pretty sure the "regulation is good" crowd are only talking about good regulations. They are not an equal and opposite side to the libertarians who are not simply against bad regulations but all regulations. (Except for the ones that they feel protect them personally.)

Comment: Re:Movies (Score 1) 105

by BasilBrush (#47437975) Attached to: FAA Pressures Coldwell, Other Realtors To Stop Using Drone Footage

It is common for the the movie industry to shoot scenes from drones.

Your assertion doesn't appear to be true.

http://www.cnn.com/2014/06/04/...

This is the way it SHOULD happen. An overall prohibition on drones then specific exceptions for uses where the benefits to society are seen to outweigh the costs.

Comment: Re:that's not the FAA's job (Score 2) 105

by BasilBrush (#47437959) Attached to: FAA Pressures Coldwell, Other Realtors To Stop Using Drone Footage

The FAA was created to regulate passenger and air traffic

Drones are air traffic.

And make no mistake, FAA's attempts to assert authority have nothing to do with safety.

For sure there's a safety angle to drone regulation. A toy drone probably weighs a few ounces, but commercial uses of drones will include much heavier vehicles. There's Amazon's plans, plus the existing illegal use by smugglers that show the way that's going to go.

But there's also the intrusiveness aspect. Sunbathers may not want their gardens overflying, nobody wants a drone hovering outside their bedroom window.

Drones are certainly not something that some be free from regulations.

Comment: Re:Perfectly appropriate action for the FAA to tak (Score 1) 105

by BasilBrush (#47437901) Attached to: FAA Pressures Coldwell, Other Realtors To Stop Using Drone Footage

But the operation of drones needs to be consistent across all uses.

Why? You go on to promote commercial drone use, so it seems unlikely that banning of hobby use would satisfy you.

A distinction can be drawn and so there's no reason not to. Hobby use is likely to remain low, with a small number of people perhaps flying for an hour or two a week. Commercial use on the other hand is likely to be far more pervasive and intrusive. Better to assume they are not allowed and grant specific permissions for uses where the gain to society is seen to outweigh the costs.

Comment: Re:Falsifiability is not optional for science (Score 1) 704

by BasilBrush (#47437123) Attached to: When Beliefs and Facts Collide

So, according to you

Nope, I never said anything of the kind.

Still waiting for you to provide evidence that falsifiability is a necessary part of science, and not just a proposal by the philosopher Karl Popper.

You can't of course.

You're wasting your time with youtube links by the way. I'm not going to waste the time it takes to watch them. You're not worth it.

Comment: Re:Falsifiability is not optional for science (Score 1) 704

by BasilBrush (#47434487) Attached to: When Beliefs and Facts Collide

If you'd like to assert that falsifiability isn't required

You're the one doing the asserting that a falsifiable statement *is* required for science. I'm not required to prove a negative.

It is not and never has been a requirement for science. It's a belief of the philosopher Karl Popper, and nothing more.

A penny saved is a penny to squander. -- Ambrose Bierce

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