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Comment: Re:Yeah (Score 2) 97

by BasilBrush (#47538787) Attached to: Private Data On iOS Devices Not So Private After All

In the TFA case, apple has control over your keys.

False. The private keys are unique to the phone and the paired device. The public keys are shared between the two when they are paired. Apple doesn't have have the private keys (or the public keys for that matter), and thus cannot read either side of the communication.

Comment: Re:Keyboards (Score 1) 221

by BasilBrush (#47533353) Attached to: Chromebooks Are Outselling iPads In Schools

I'd argue that engineers provide quality apps for iOS despite Objective-C, and not because of it.

How many iOS apps have you worked on?

Except the "old thing" is practically from the 1980s.

C is even older. As is the Unix model (programs, shell, POSIX) that Linux users swear by.

I'd agree that Objective-Cs deficiencies are in the C parts. The good "Objective" parts are being retained in Swift.

I'd still rather have Objective-C even with the C baggage than Java. I did a course once that used Java as the language, and I hated it.

Anyhow, this is rapidly becoming an obsolete debate with Swift 1.0 approaching rapidly.

Comment: Re:Keyboards (Score 1) 221

by BasilBrush (#47532619) Attached to: Chromebooks Are Outselling iPads In Schools

Yes, because people not even being ever confronted with programming before enrolling into a university course is the optimal approach to STEM promotion.

Who told you you couldn't learn programming on an iPad?

https://www.google.co.uk/webhp...

Apple hasn't been able to provide programmers with a decent consistent and modern language for over a decade.

Objective-C and Cocoa continue to be great, and produces far better quality apps than on exist on Android. Swift one day might be better. But the "oh there's something new coming along so the old thing must be crap" game is juvenile.

Comment: Re:Keyboards (Score 1) 221

by BasilBrush (#47532399) Attached to: Chromebooks Are Outselling iPads In Schools

Porn is viewable in the browser these days.

Not on school networks it's not.

No hacker tools is a major crippling factor in iOS in any educational settings. No in-process compilation => no JIT-equipped programming learning environments, no LuaJIT, no hosted Oberon or any similar environment, no nothing.

The topic is schools. Not computer science/software engineering at university.

Compared to the technical capabilities of iOS and OSX, Android and Chrome are the crapfest of the century.

Comment: Re:Keyboards (Score 1) 221

by BasilBrush (#47532365) Attached to: Chromebooks Are Outselling iPads In Schools

...except consumer tablets aren't proper digitizers. This is especially true for platforms where a stylus is a banned option because it doesn't seem fashionable enough.

Your ignorance is showing.
https://www.fiftythree.com/pen...

Even a mundane mouse is better at the "direct manipulation" stuff than what's provided on your average consumer tablet.

Ignorance again. A mouse cannot be direct manipulation. It's an indirect tool. You move your hand on one place, and a pointer moves in another. It's like the difference between piloting a plane, and controlling a model aircraft.

Comment: Re:Keyboards (Score 1) 221

by BasilBrush (#47532311) Attached to: Chromebooks Are Outselling iPads In Schools

Lack of "hacker" tools is a disadvantage for any educational environment. Students might actually be expected to create something rather than just being mindless consumers.

You seem to be confusing schools with universities. Creating hacker tools is beyond school level education, and for the occasional over achiever who might want to try it on their own, will usually find it a disciplinary offence.

There have already been educational programs mired by patent attacks that have been pre-emptively banned from the iPad.

If it breaks IP law it shouldn't be in schools.

Comment: Re: Eh? (Score 1) 137

by BasilBrush (#47532275) Attached to: Internet Explorer Vulnerabilities Increase 100%

The number of vulnerabilities per time has, but the number has not. Both numbers are 10. 10 is 0% more than 10.

Yeah, that's what a rate is.

They're making a prediction on the total number of vulnerabilities based on the rate of vulnerabilities.

No they're not. You are. There is a point at which language pedantry becomes idiocy you know.

Comment: Re:Ugh. (Score 1) 164

by BasilBrush (#47531251) Attached to: Mac OS X Yosemite Beta Opens

Terrible font - Helvetica Neue roman needs to die in a fire when compared to Helvetica medium or Lucida Grande.
Font is too thin, spacing is too wide. Looks weak, girly, empty, frail. Ick.

Are you looking at it on Retina? That's what it's optimised for. The rest of us will have to put up with it until the time comes to upgrade hardware.

Comment: Re:Flat UI Design (Score 0) 164

by BasilBrush (#47531075) Attached to: Mac OS X Yosemite Beta Opens

Fuck these designers who have no idea how to make a good UI, but sure know how to destroy one.

Clearly they do. It's their specialism. Your disagreement is because people tend to be resistant to change - even when after a period of time they come to appreciate the improvement.

Chances are in the years to come you'll look back at pseudo 3D controls and think they look cheap and tacky. Just as 1990s GUIs now look grey and boxy.

Comment: Re:Flat UI Design (Score 0) 164

by BasilBrush (#47531037) Attached to: Mac OS X Yosemite Beta Opens

A 'Notebook' that does not look anymore like a notebook is hard to find on the UI.

The icon still looks like a notebook, so how's it hard to find?The UI of the notes app itself doesn't need to look like a notebook. I'm more familiar with typing text into an app than writing text in a notebook, so I don't need the metaphor whilst using the app.

A calendar that does not look like a calendar but like a piece of paper coloured by a child, a bit like a copy of what our days MS Outlook looks like, is uncomprehendable, unuseable.

And yet the calendars on iOS7 and Yosemite both work better than their predecessors.

Comment: Re:What is so wrong with Skuemorphism? (Score 0) 164

by BasilBrush (#47530911) Attached to: Mac OS X Yosemite Beta Opens

Anyone like seeing only 2 videos instead of 7 on youtube on our phones due to big fonts and flat elements?

If you're talking about iOS 7 or 8, ten the font sizes are adjustable for accessibility. Choose a smaller size.

There is a reason Skuemorphism was used. Namely ... IT WORKS.

It works FOR BEGINNERS.

Skuemorphism is a visual metaphor. Metaphors can help introduce people to new concepts by referencing old familiar ones. But once the concept is understood, the metaphor gets in the way and can only mislead or clutter. Skuemorphic buttons were good for teaching computer newbies about mouse clicking on screen items. Skuemorphic buttons were good for easing phone users over from real buttons to touch screens. But people who know how to use computers or phones don't need them.

Notice that most clickable things on the web do not have Skuemorphic button chrome. In the beginning they used purple text and underlining to indicate which text was clickable. Even that is not needed any more as people have more experience of the web.

If IOS looked like it did in 2007 it frankly wouldn't sell.

Absolutely. But we're more sophisticated people than we were in 2007.

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