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Comment Re:It depends on who is in charge (Score 1) 434 434

I will quote once more

" His authority to classify and control access to information bearing on national security and to determine whether an individual is sufficiently trustworthy to occupy a position in the Executive Branch that will give that person access to such information flows primarily from this constitutional investment of power in the President and exists quite apart from any explicit congressional grant."

The President, due to solely wielding the constitutional power of the executive, can classify and declassify information as he pleases. Also, there are many individuals in Government who have been granted by the President the power to classify and declassify information.

Comment Re:It depends on who is in charge (Score 1) 434 434

You're actually flat out wrong.

The President, after all, is the "Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States." U.S. Const., Art. II, 2. His authority to classify and control access to information bearing on national security and to determine whether an individual is sufficiently trustworthy to occupy a position in the Executive Branch that will give that person access to such information flows primarily from this constitutional investment of power in the President and exists quite apart from any explicit congressional grant. See Cafeteria Workers v. McElroy, 367 U.S. 886, 890 (1961). This Court has recognized the Government's "compelling interest" in withholding national security information from unauthorized persons in the course of executive business. Snepp v. United States, 444 U.S. 507, 509 , n. 3 (1980). See also United States v. Robel, 389 U.S. 258, 267 (1967); United States v. Reynolds, 345 U.S. 1, 10 (1953); Totten v. United States, 92 U.S. 105, 106 (1876). The authority to protect such information falls on the President as head of the Executive Branch and as Commander in Chief. - See more at: http://caselaw.findlaw.com/us-...

http://caselaw.findlaw.com/us-supreme-court/484/518.html

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