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Comment meme (Score 1) 3

What is the name of your least favorite child? I hate all children, equally.

In what year did you abandon your dreams? 2009, when I realized the recession was going to be a severe one.

What is the maiden name of your father’s mistress? Football.

At what age did your childhood pet run away? My pets have always loved me. Because they know they're not people.

What was the name of your favorite unpaid internship? Yard work for my parents.

In what city did you first experience ennui? Try English next time.

What is your ex-wife’s newest last name? Marriage is for suckers.

What sports team do you fetishize to avoid meaningful discussion with others? Watching sports is (generally) boring.

What is the name of your favorite canceled TV show? Nowhere Man.

What was the middle name of your first rebound? Off the backboard.

On what street did you lose your childlike sense of wonder? It was closed for resurfacing that day.

When did you stop trying? When I realized what Lefties truly are.

Comment sounds an awful lot like (Score 1) 2

What I want is to be able to configure a user's home page on the website with their choice & order of several widgets.

That sounds exactly like what I've (only*) read ASP.NET WebForms' "Web Parts" is for.

*I wouldn't know in practice; the place I work at never really learned ASP.NET, so they re-invented things like Web Parts and ASP.NET Membership.

after doing MVC the last 4 projects I'm thinking Yuck too with these code-behinds

Couldn't parse that of course, but it jogged my memory of something from an earlier discussion, where you said MVC was overkill for what you were doing, and after Slashdumb closed the discussion I was thinking the following. We've used ASP.NET MVC for our last three projects. Yet we haven't structured our code in the MVC pattern. The MVC pattern is just used by ASP.NET MVC framework, that we hook into. But really that's the same as WebForms. We don't architect our code to some kind of code-behind model, or say copy the Viewstate concept for anything else in our code. We just hook into the framework we're using, however it's been architected. Either way our application architectures are always (very poorly done) 3-tier ones.

p.s. We've stopped doing WebForms projects, so I've no idea if/how well that supports HTML5. Why I prefer ASP.NET MVC is the control over the HTML generated (which is especially important for jQuery-heavy UI's, like my immediate boss has grown accustomed to), and I started out web programming in now-classic ASP, so I had to learn how it really worked, sans WebForms' hiding of statelessness et al. (To me what WebForms hides from me, not to mention imposes on me (if you haven't been tripped up by the page life cycle, you haven't done anything really complex), is more trouble than it's worth. WebForms was intended to allow desktop application developers to make web apps without having to learn too much (the programming model is, intentionally, *very* similar to WinForms). So it doesn't at all apply to me (as a benefit).)

Submission Boulders high on the coast of Cape Verde show 170-270m Tsunami 73,000 years ago->

TaleSlinger writes: Researchers from University of Bristol, UK found that boulders strewn 200m above sea level on Cape Verde, off the west coast of Africa, were ripped from cliffs below and washed up there by a tsunami between 170m and 270m (550-850ft).
Researchers at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory dated the tsunami at 73,000 years ago.
Its interesting that this is about the same time as the Mt. Toba Eruption and about the same time humans nearly became extinct.

Link to Original Source

Submission Intuit stores users' ids, passwords and financial data

wbean writes: I wonder how many Quicken users understand that their user ids, passwords and financial data are stored on Intuit servers. This seems like a disaster waiting to happen. Take a look at this link:

Click on the "Express Web Connect / Quicken Connect — Details" link near the bottom of the page to get the full scoop on what Intuit stores.

Consultants are mystical people who ask a company for a number and then give it back to them.