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Comment: Re:Back in the day... (Score 1) 110

by BancBoy (#48591281) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Best Software To Revive PocketPCs With Windows Mobile 5-6?
Loved the Libretto back in the 90s. Paperback book sized portable workstation. Had a Ricochet Wireless modem hooked up. Road Warrior stuff! I remember running the Windows NT 5 Betas and then 2K on it. I even had it dual boot into BeOS. If memory serves, the trick around the proprietary floppy issue was that we used a PC Card controller hooked up to an external portable CD-ROM drive to install alternate operating systems.

Comment: Re:Why? (Score 1) 327

by BancBoy (#48400355) Attached to: Apple Disables Trim Support On 3rd Party SSDs In OS X

NeXT couldn't keep up with Intel and by the time Jobs caved in and went with his dual-architecture 68K/Intel binary format, it was too late.

Whilst Apple did have hybrid 68k/PPC binaries back in the 90s, and they did have hybrid PPC/Intel applications during the transition to Intel CPUs,.."68K/Intel binary format"?

Comment: Re:Speaking for myself (Score 2) 320

by BancBoy (#48066617) Attached to: The Era of Saturday Morning Cartoons Is Dead

In the mid 1990's the government mandated that children's programming be educational.

Did they really? I was under the impression that they mandated a certain amount of Educational/Informative Children's Programming be shown per week. Hence the Sunday morning cartoons in the time slot when the network didn't have any sporting event or important programming to show.

The Military

Could Tech Have Stopped ISIS From Using Our Own Heavy Weapons Against Us? 448

Posted by Soulskill
from the smart-phones-are-way-smarter-than-smart-bombs dept.
JonZittrain writes: This summer, ISIS insurgents captured Mosul — with with it, three divisions' worth of advanced American military hardware. After ISIS used it to capture the Mosul Dam, the U.S. started bombing its own pirated equipment. Could sophisticated military tanks and anti-aircraft missiles given or sold to countries like Iraq be equipped with a way to disable them if they're compromised, without opening them up to hacking by an enemy?

We already require extra authentication at a distance to arm nuclear weapons, and last season's 24 notwithstanding, we routinely operate military drones at a distance. Reportedly in the Falkland Islands war, Margaret Thatcher was able to extract codes to disable Argentina's Exocet missiles from the French. The simplest implementation might be like the proposal for land mines that expire after a certain time. Perhaps tanks — currently usable without even an ignition key — could require a renewal code digitally signed by the owning country to be entered manually or received by satellite every six months or so.

I'm a skeptic of kill switches, especially in consumer devices, but still found myself writing up the case for a way to disable military hardware in the field. There are lots of reasons it might not work — or work too well — but is there a way to improve on what we face now?
Earth

Fighting Invasive Fish With Forks and Knives 180

Posted by samzenpus
from the don't-forget-the-tartar dept.
An anonymous reader writes NPR commentator Bonny Wolf has a unique solution to battle the threat of invasive fish species in our waterways. She proposes we fight them with a knife, fork, and a few lemon wedges. From the article: "Take the northern snakehead, which has made its way into tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay. It competes with native species for food, and then eats the native species, not to mention the odd frog or bird, with its mouthful of sharp teeth. It's been called "Fishzilla." It breeds fast, has no natural predators and can grow to be 4 feet long. The northern snakehead hangs out in grassy shallows, making it hard to catch. But a couple of years ago, Maryland started promoting the snakehead as an eating fish. Its harvest has increased from zero to 5,000 pounds a year."

Long computations which yield zero are probably all for naught.

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