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Comment: Re:As an ex. Commodore Service tech (Score 1) 192

by Bambi Dee (#47515297) Attached to: The Almost Forgotten Story of the Amiga 2000

there was also an A1200 which was a later version of a 500-type layout. I don't remember if that was US only.

I've got a mildly souped up German A1200HD next to me right now, built by a German company after the demise of Commodore. They also sold a tower version of the A4000. The A1200 is something like the keyboard-case counterpart to the A4000. OS 3.0/3.1, internal IDE connector, 68020, early PCMCIA slot, AGA graphics with 16.8 colours (not at the same time) and various crazy resolutions like 1024x1024 or 1280x512.

Comment: Re: Why is it embarrassing? (Score 1) 814

by Bambi Dee (#44020729) Attached to: Transgendered Folks Encountering Document/Database ID Hassles
I don't get too angry at the world for largely sticking to an either/or idea of gender; that's inconvenient but still understandable. I just wish the gender field could be made optional more often, along with that dreaded form of address field. It's a little more difficult than a change address because there can be a long "homeless" or "I live here, but my mail still goes there" period - although I can't say I've run into any real trouble because of the mismatch (but then I've yet to "fly while trans").

Comment: Re: Why is it embarrassing? (Score 1) 814

by Bambi Dee (#44020605) Attached to: Transgendered Folks Encountering Document/Database ID Hassles
What you (or whoever it was if it wasn't you) asked was "why is it embarrassing?", not "why would you think it'd never come up again?". Of course it'll come up again and again for possibly a long time. And yes, it shouldn't be embarrassing... but many trans people do have an intense degree of gender/body dysphoria. They feel awful about their faces, body shape, hair, skin, voice, pronouns, or about being seen or treated as that unloved other gender. This doesn't just magically clear up when you've reached the point where you (can) change your "official" gender. Yes, it takes effort and often some bravery to pull this off, but it can be a bravery born out of discomfort and need rather than out of "prouder" feelings like ambition or motivation.

Comment: Re:Gnome...is it beautiful? (Score 1) 169

by Bambi Dee (#43930583) Attached to: One Week With GNOME 3 Classic

I think it is and, well, isn't. I love the generously laid out (layouted?) minimalist white-on-black of the Gnome shell itself. Clean and uncluttered fits. But I don't much like the default GTK 2/3 theme (too angular, too silvery-grey) and the somewhat incoherent icon theme. Fortunately there're a few working alternatives to those, so in the end it's still the nicest-looking desktop I remember having. And I wasn't a big fan of Gnome 1/2.

Comment: What a bewildering game (Score 1) 146

by Bambi Dee (#43891923) Attached to: Salvaging E.T. In Software, Instead of New Mexico
...I've never known how to play it. Had the module, but no manual. It was almost as bewildering as Raiders of the Lost Ark. Didn't help that I hadn't, and still haven't, seen either movie (honestly...). Sadly my favourite 2600 games are rarely mentioned any more (most are by Imagic and Activision, not Atari).

Comment: Re:Fonts! (Score 1) 56

by Bambi Dee (#42462967) Attached to: An Ode To Skulpture
Oh, I meant the fonts, which don't have anything to do with Skulpture. I think Skulpture is nice enough in a "Windows 95 plus polish" kinda way... then again I'm not really looking for "Windows 95 plus polish". Liking my rounded corners and hipster flatness, actually...

Comment: Re:Fonts! (Score 1) 56

by Bambi Dee (#42456257) Attached to: An Ode To Skulpture
I'm not sure I can see the problems, except for the kerning issue in the small text. I'm mostly using Gnome Shell and GTK 2/3 applications at the moment and frankly didn't notice a difference versus KDE. Deja Vu Serif looks pretty much the same to me in Gedit (say) as in your first screenshot... maybe I'm just not used to anything better...

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