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Comment: Re:Easy of porting over is the key (Score 1) 199

by Baloo Uriza (#49149809) Attached to: The State of Linux Gaming In the SteamOS Era

Not to mention as long as Torvalds has a pulse the driver situation will NEVER get any better as Torvalds refuses to let go of the same crap driver model he has been pushing since 1993, so they get the "fun" of dealing with that mess, and for what?

Oh, I'm sorry that having plug'n'play actually work on a far wider variety of devices, and much more rapidly, right out of the box is such an inconvenience to you. Didn't know moving a keyboard from one port to another without having to wait 10 minutes to install another copy of the same keyboard driver is such a massive burden. If anything, the Linux hardware support model is proof positive that hardware guys shouldn't go near compilers, and programmers shouldn't wield soldering irons. The only folks who haven't seemed to get this through their thick fucking skulls yet are nVidia and AMD, and let's face it, their drivers are blowful on every platform.

Comment: Re:Easy of porting over is the key (Score 1) 199

by Baloo Uriza (#49149687) Attached to: The State of Linux Gaming In the SteamOS Era

They don't require a user have expert knowledge.

This isn't 1998 anymore. Linux doesn't require "expert knowledge" to run and use.

This. Microsoft hasn't put out an easy to use OS in over a decade now, and even XP was pushing it. It's to the point where it's usually easier to run Linux than it is to run Windows, because at least Linux will work reasonably well for most people out of the box without fucking around with a diaspora of idiot vendor-written drivers spread across the internet. Good luck if Windows didn't bother to include the right ethernet driver, a problem Linux hasn't had since I was a sophomore in high school almost 20 years ago.

Right now Linux just isn't popular with gamers because there are no games for it, and there are no games for it because gamers don't use it.

If it doesn't release on Linux, it doesn't exist. Wolfenstein: The New Order is the new Duke Nukem Forever. Fucking Bethesda ruins everything.

Comment: As a native recovering Portlander... (Score 1) 158

Their first hint should have been from the last time this happened in the 1980s and 1990s, and Hillsboro got built up from being a farm town in the middle of the last arable land west of Portland to one of the 5 largest cities in the state, now making it pretty much nonstop city from Forest Grove to Wood Village. Yet the gridlock is horrible because all the tax breaks that were given to build up the tech meant that there's nothing in terms of basic infrastructure to support it. Intel's campuses sit on two lane farm roads, with the exception of Hawthorne Farm (which has it's own MAX station), despite being, literally, in the middle of a city with more than 100,000 people and no mass transit to speak of (TriMet largely doesn't serve Washington County except for the MAX, and frequent service ends miles east of the economic incentive zone in Beaverton). God help you if your house catches fire or you have a heart attack at rush hour, nothing's getting through that traffic. But that's only the tip of the socioeconomic iceburg.

I was born and raised in Portland on Jessup and Garfield, just off of 99E, in the only part of town that has any racial diversity. I'm Cherokee, I'm bisexual, and I can't say I miss the low IT wages, unavailability of anything longer than a six month contract, employer abuse of H1B visas (we're looking at you, Intel, undermining a market with 20% U6 unemployment to basically hold wage slaves on the threat of deportation!), extremely high cost of living, and entrenched white-supremacist racism and homophobia. Or getting harassed by the Washington County Sheriff's Office, Hillsboro Police, Beaverton Police and the Portland Police Bureau on a twice-weekly basis for driving or waiting the bus while redskin (yet, good luck getting one of 'em to turn up any of the more than a dozen times my home was broken into or my vehicle stolen over the years; that only happened during a brief few months living in Salem, turns out Oregon State Police are the only professionals there). Or getting punched in the face by a total stranger for holding my boyfriend's hand on the MAX (Portland Police's answer? "Don't hold hands."). Worst yet, I didn't know this wasn't normal behavior for people until I just packed what I could into a duffelbag, spent the last of my money on a plane ticket, took the MAX one last time to Portland Airport and flew off into the sunrise, and discovered that Oregon, all of it, big cities included, is an unmitigated backwater yearning to be the hipster version of the Deep South.

You know your hometown has a problem when moving to an indian reservation in the midwest, sight unseen, a single bag of clothes, no savings, and no game plan, when the only thing you know that's waiting for you when you get there is a safe couch to surf, and even without taking advantage of any of the tribal benefits, it improves every aspect of your life personally and professionally, being the exact opposite of Oregon in every regard, with the sole exception of relatively minor things like sales tax rate (way lower prices and WAY higher wages more than offset this, though) and access to public transportation. I have my own car now (which hasn't been stolen yet, making 3 years and counting the longest I've ever owned a car), I have my own home now (which hasn't been broken into yet, equally record-setting), and I have job security and upward mobility (both of which are things you read about other people having if you're in Oregon).

Self sufficient income and personal safety are two things I deeply lacked in Oregon, and it's the three things I prize above everything else now (hey, you live the first 30 years of your life without those two things and the novelty won't wear off once you do). About the only way I'd ever go back there is if someone actually hired me with a high enough wage so that I don't have to deal with the locals unless I really want to, and make me well off enough inside a few months that I could go back home to Oklahoma and take the rest of the year off, or fatten out my retirement (retirement is something else that actually looks like it's not purely in fantasyland anymore). And I like Portland compared to some of the other folks I've seen show up living here that I knew back in Portland...

Oregon needs to wake up and start putting people back to work, because the longer Oregon slides deeper in to the Bush Depression of 2002, the more it reaps what it sows in crime, income inequality and poverty. You'd think they'd have figured it out by now given it's been getting worse almost half my life now. Oklahoma clearly figured it out.

Comment: Re:Terrible (Score 1) 77

by Baloo Uriza (#49080607) Attached to: OpenStreetMap.org Gets Routing

I'm sorry, but openstreetmaps can't even find my place of employment given the full street address. Compared to something like google maps, it is terrible.

So go add it? Try expanding abbreviations?

With google I can give just the street name and it ends up close enough to navigate me there in less than a second. With other locations, google (and pretty much anything else but osm) can get by with just a business or street name and city.

To find my house, osm needs a ridiculous amount of information, such as my county. The default location on the map isn't even the correct continent for me - something easily determined by my IP address.

Places where you need that level of information to find something have the opposite problem with Google Maps. Google is unfuckwithably impossible to locate where you're trying to go. This is especially true in the US for addresses that have a house name instead of a house number. Which, if you've ever traveled around the reservations of the Five Civilized Tribes and their neighbors, is actually a pretty common problem (only further compounded by the fact that there's literally thousands of unnamed roads, and the roads that are named tend to recycle the same names in every town).

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