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Comment: Re:Windows !!! (Score 1) 90

by BadDreamer (#49558251) Attached to: Buggy Win 95 Code Almost Wrecked Stuxnet Campaign

How many vulnerabilities is there in Ubuntu 6?

39 total vulnerabilities, 7 high severity, 27 medium severity, 5 low severity.

http://www.gfi.com/blog/most-v...

Debian Sid?

Couldn't find that. It's in NVD though, if you're really interested.

https://nvd.nist.gov/

Windows XP is FIFTEEN YEARS OLD

No it's not. It's still under development, and there is almost nothing left of the codebase from the original XP when you have patched up an XP install.

Otherwise Linux is TWENTYFOUR YEARS OLD, but you know, writing that in all caps as if it means something just seems silly. Because it is.

And hardly any of the Linux vulnerabilities allow a web client attack, like a whole slew of the Windows ones do. Because Linux does not have a web browser with kernel access. Therefore, the low level vulnerabilities in Linux are not like the low level vulnerabilities you are used to.

Comment: Re:Hah (Score 1) 296

by BadDreamer (#49553991) Attached to: Microsoft, Chip Makers Working On Hardware DRM For Windows 10 PCs

A case can possibly be made for lossless, especially for complex music. A fan of Meshuggah can usually tell the difference between lossy compressed and lossless versions of their tracks. However, even a good mp3 compression algorithm at decent bitrate is so good it's very hard to beat chance in an ABX test.

As to 24 bits and any sample rate over 60kHz? Only useful for trying to blow up stereo systems and turning people deaf. The dynamic range of 16 bits alone is more than a healthy, young human can make use of outside the laboratory (or even for the most part inside it) and is much, much higher than that of any music. And if there is magical information hiding above around 20kHz, we simply can't hear it - or see it with any existing measurement tools, which means we can't record it either.

Comment: Re:This never works (Score 1) 296

by BadDreamer (#49553905) Attached to: Microsoft, Chip Makers Working On Hardware DRM For Windows 10 PCs

4K downsized to 1080P gives a great more detail, due to downsampling gives a higher detail, due to 1080P using 4 blocks with the same pixel, so 4k downsize, each 4 blocks are have a different pixel, its very noticeable

That downsampling can be done before the pixels are pushed to your TV and will yield the exact same benefits.

Comment: Re:The study was flawed (Score 1) 90

by BadDreamer (#49553865) Attached to: Bees Prefer Nectar Laced With Neonicotinoids

I agree it is important to ask questions. But the questions should not be of the strawman form, or asked from a position of apparent and obvious ignorance about not only the subject, but the very study being questioned. There is no added value, and in fact negative value, to ask that kind of questions.

Trying to think laterally about the issue and find other causes for the observed behaviour is completely different from ignorantly spouting off unfounded criticism of test methodology.

Comment: Re:Windows !!! (Score 1) 90

by BadDreamer (#49553823) Attached to: Buggy Win 95 Code Almost Wrecked Stuxnet Campaign

If we are talking found and reported vulnerabilities, then yes, Linux has more. Although notably, even grouping together all Linux kernel vulnerabilities regardless of version the number of HIGH vulnerabilities is not higher than the number of HIGH vulnerabilities in Windows 8.1.

But then, it's a lot easier to get fewer vulnerabilities when dropping support for one of the most used OS'es on the planet. Although XP is only on about 14% of all PC's now, it appears. And now support for Windows 8.1 is dropped as well. That seems to be the way Microsoft keeps vulnerabilities in supported systems down; by simply dumping older OS'es.

Comment: Re:Industrial revolution was a disaster... (Score 1) 288

by BadDreamer (#49530743) Attached to: Robot Workers' Real Draw: Reducing Dependence on Human Workers

Given that you were talking about the industrial revolution, which was ended by 1840, those numbers have nothing at all to do with your claims. The industrial revolution is not the cause of this fall, and even if it figures in to some extent it can not be the major reason as the numbers are from over a century later.

Comment: Re:the endgame is ironic here (Score 1) 288

by BadDreamer (#49525821) Attached to: Robot Workers' Real Draw: Reducing Dependence on Human Workers

I don't hear those arguments as I do not live in the US. I live in a democracy where the constitution provides the limits of government. Something you claim does not exist.

If I were you I'd demand the money you paid for that so called education back. It evidently has not enabled you to comprehend reality, only to project your wishful thinking on the world.

Comment: Re:the endgame is ironic here (Score 1) 288

by BadDreamer (#49522335) Attached to: Robot Workers' Real Draw: Reducing Dependence on Human Workers

As a result of these discussions I make certain that people realize that calling this country a "democracy" is in fact part-and-parcel of a straw-man argument.

Except you have no support for this assertion other than bad (even incomprehensible) grammar and personal incredulity.

Comment: Re:the endgame is ironic here (Score 1) 288

by BadDreamer (#49521529) Attached to: Robot Workers' Real Draw: Reducing Dependence on Human Workers

Of bloody course a democracy and a republic are not the same; the concepts are complementary.

And I live in a democracy, which has a constitution, so your comments about them not having one betrays a complete lack of comprehension of reality. You're off your rockers, or just plain dumb, and either way need to learn a lot more before you spout off about stuff you do not understand again.

Comment: Re:Hmmm (Score 1) 392

by BadDreamer (#49237715) Attached to: Does USB Type C Herald the End of Apple's Proprietary Connectors?

I need a small, light laptop with a good display, primarily for writing and coding with the occasional browsing (though I mostly use an iPad for that). I need excellent portability, high resolution, modest cpu, good battery life and ease of docking and use.

When I am on the move, I want as few openings collecting dust as possible. I want no fan sucking dusty air through the machine. In the past I needed USB for memory sticks, but these days that is rare as I send material over email or dropbox instead, or just check it into git. And I don't want to stick a foreign USB stick into my machine. Lack of USB1/2 is a bonus. I also have no need for external screens when on the move.

If I dock it, I want one connector to the laptop which goes to a hub connecting to all my desktop peripherals and power; I have no desire to click in lots of different connectors, power and other stuff. One cable, or a "click in" dock. Not two cables. Absolutely not three cables (power, display, USB). That's just nuts. Why should I need to plug all that cruft in when one cable could do it all? As to keyboard and mouse, those are bluetooth and need no cables.

The Macbook Air is a different model than what I want. It has unnecessary ports I would not use - and worse, no port which can do everything for docking. It has a needless fan sucking dust through the machine, and a low resolution screen, all in the name of getting more cpu power I have no need for. It's not aimed at the same needs. Merging those lines would leave some users out. And yes, my need is not the typical (although it is a lot more common than people on /. seem to realize). A lot of people still believe they need all those ports, even though they can't recall when they last used them. That is why the Macbook Air still exists, and will for a while longer. And yes, this is where Jobs would have simply killed it and told people to deal with it.

Comment: Re:In Massachusetts... (Score 1) 1051

by BadDreamer (#48587165) Attached to: Time To Remove 'Philosophical' Exemption From Vaccine Requirements?

That is a *horrible* compromise, because what will *cause* an outbreak is compromised herd immunity. And this compromise allows for compromise of herd immunity.

When the outbreak happens, cause by this excemption system, the damage is already done and children are probably already dying. And worse, this lets the disease get a foothold and provides it with a breeding ground to mutate from, which allows it to improve its ability to overcome vaccination.

There is NOTHING good about this "compromise". It's horrible. The only way to conclude it is anything but atrocious is to be completely clueless about how disease and vaccinations work.

If it happens once, it's a bug. If it happens twice, it's a feature. If it happens more than twice, it's a design philosophy.

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