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Comment: Re:In Massachusetts... (Score 1) 1051

by BadDreamer (#48587165) Attached to: Time To Remove 'Philosophical' Exemption From Vaccine Requirements?

That is a *horrible* compromise, because what will *cause* an outbreak is compromised herd immunity. And this compromise allows for compromise of herd immunity.

When the outbreak happens, cause by this excemption system, the damage is already done and children are probably already dying. And worse, this lets the disease get a foothold and provides it with a breeding ground to mutate from, which allows it to improve its ability to overcome vaccination.

There is NOTHING good about this "compromise". It's horrible. The only way to conclude it is anything but atrocious is to be completely clueless about how disease and vaccinations work.

Comment: Re:There is no vaccine for the worst diseases (Score 1) 1051

by BadDreamer (#48587113) Attached to: Time To Remove 'Philosophical' Exemption From Vaccine Requirements?

And if you no-one around you had the vaccine you'd be dead now, since that means you're very sensitive to pertussis.

Adjuvants are an excellent tool. What about them do you want us to look at? How well they do their job?

Doctors get MORE money from letting you and all the kids around you get pertussis and treat it. Lots more. We're talking magnitudes here. Vaccines are a horribly bad deal from a business perspective; there is a lot more money in letting people get sick. So much more that a comparison is nuts. Trying to argue doctors provide vaccinations to pad their wallets is a complete and utter disconnect from any scientific evidence and reality.

No scientific objections here, just pure ignorance and prejudice.

Comment: Re:Burial customs? (Score 1) 244

by BadDreamer (#48475123) Attached to: Health Advisor: Ebola Still Spreading, Worst Outbreak We've Ever Seen

Actually the computer was invented in Germany, and my CPU was developed in Israel. Most of the rest of the parts were developed and manufactured in Asia.

In fact, I can't find a single component in my computer which is from the US. Nor in my network solution, or the network of my house.

Comment: Re:To be expected (Score 1) 473

by BadDreamer (#48416371) Attached to: Elite: Dangerous Dumps Offline Single-Player

But that isn't the comparison. It's dropping usage by 99% *period*, and increasing the paid portion of the *remaining* use by 10%. Because that is what happens if your game isn't already in a hit series, with very few exceptions.

Plus. games which have a Minecraft model just keep selling. At GoG you can buy games which were made over 20 years ago, and they still sell. Very few games which charge by server use keep selling.

Comment: Re:Hyperbolic headlines strike again (Score 1) 181

by BadDreamer (#48344559) Attached to: There's No Such Thing As a General-Purpose Processor

This is why we at one time had Lisp Machines with specialized hardware optimized for running Lisp efficiently. Message based machines were tried for Smalltalk.

But people do not use these kinds of languages enough. Operating systems and applications are largely written in C and its derivatives. That is why processors optimized for C won out.

So yes, it is in a way a vicious circle. Most of our software is C, so most of our hardware is optimized for C, so writing software in C makes the most efficient use of it.

Comment: Re:I don't really see the point. (Score 1) 130

Cubasis with a number of software synthesizers and some filters on recorded tracks is heavy number crunching, and something the tablet format is excellent for. More computing power means more filters and synthesizers, meaning less limitations on what can be done right away.

Many synthesizers and trackers can be used for realtime performances, and there the limiting factor is raw CPU power. This move is excellent news for those using iPads to perform.

Comment: Re:it solves some unicode issues (Score 1) 774

by BadDreamer (#48105027) Attached to: Systemd Adding Its Own Console To Linux Systems

And how many of those binaries can you replace with previously existing alternatives to do the same thing? Can you unplug journald and instead run a previous logging daemon? Remove 20-30 of those binaries and instead use the older solutions for the same problems?

Unless you can, it's monolithic.

Comment: Re:Every new employee (Score 1) 554

Mainly because it was touted as an intuitive interface, but it wasn't. It made use of non-obvious gestures and key presses to do everyday tasks. This made it a power user interface, excellent for people who love spending time in the OS instead of in their applications.

Unfortunately that is hardly any people at all. And therefore hardly any people at all liked it.

Comment: Re:Locking USB... (Score 2) 97

by BadDreamer (#48054835) Attached to: Hacking USB Firmware

You can lock the flash memory as much as you like. The PRAM on the Phison chip is unaffected.

What is being reprogrammed is the Phison control chip. There is no write enable pin on the Phison chip. It has a pin to control the write lock of the flash memory, but that has no effect on the Phison PRAM where the firmware resides.

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