Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:File this under "no shit" (Score 2) 331

by BDZ (#40899425) Attached to: Wozniak Predicts Horrible Problems With the Cloud
You are very much and sadly correct.

I have, every time the revised TOS pops up, hit "decline". If I try to start one of the games I actually have currently installed I get the pop up. Hit "decline" and it closes down. The games are not launchable. I haven't tried to reinstall anything I have purchased from them, but just downloading and installing a game I purchased will, I assume, not even be possible without agreeing to the new TOS. Of course, even if I could install one, I would not be able to play it anyway.

I've been going back and forth with Steam Support on this and not getting any definitive explanations to my questions. The only thing I am told is that unless I agree I cannot access any Steam services. Sure makes me feel robbed to not be able to access the games I paid them for already. Not like I use them to play online or intend to ever again make a purchase from them, so they can cut me off from using any of their services aside from being able to access the games I paid them for.

I have also sent some emails from Valve's contact page. Gabe Newell is on vacation until the 24th of this month. I wrote an email to one of the points of contact he recommended in his vacation auto-reply. Haven't heard anything back yet, but it hasn't even been 24 hours at this point.
Businesses

The Gradual Death of the Brick and Mortar Tech Store 491

Posted by samzenpus
from the say-hello-to-the-dodo dept.
Cutting_Crew writes "As we all know brick and mortar stores have been closing left and right recently. We had CompUSA, Borders and Circuit City all close their doors within the last 4 years. According to an article on Forbes.com, it is spelled out pretty clearly why Best Buy is next in line to shut its doors for good. Some of the reasons highlighted include a 40% drop is Best Buy stock in 2011, lack of vision regarding their online services, management too concerned with store sales instead of margins and blatant disregard for quality customer service."
Input Devices

Research Lets You Type Words By Thought Alone 114

Posted by StoneLion
from the put-on-your-thinking-cap dept.
An anonymous reader writes "How about typing on a computer just by thinking about it? The downside is you have to wear a skull cap with electrodes that capture your brain waves like an EEG machine. According to this EE Times story, a team of researchers from Belgium and the Netherlands has presented Mind Speller, a thought-to-text device intended to help people with movement disabilities. The system does rely on a lot of processing on a remote computer, but it is a wireless system. And these thought-to-computer systems have wider applicability than medical support. One of the research groups involved in this development has already looked at wireless electroencephalography (EEG) to enable measures of emotion to be fed back into computer games."
Networking

Cisco's New Router — Trouble For Hollywood 335

Posted by Soulskill
from the giving-pirates-a-bigger-pipe dept.
Shakrai writes "Time Magazine has published an article about the impact of Cisco's new CRS-3 router on the business practices of the MAFIAA. This new router was previously mentioned here on Slashdot and is expected to alleviate internet bottlenecks that currently impede steaming video-on-demand services. Some of the highlights from the article: 'The ability to download albums and films in a matter of seconds is a harbinger of deep trouble for the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) and the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), which would prefer to turn the clock back, way back. ... The hard fact is that the latest developments at Cisco, Google and elsewhere may do more than kill the DVD and CD and further upset entertainment-business models that have changed little since the Mesozoic Era. With superfast streaming and downloading, indie filmmakers will soon be able to effectively distribute feature films online and promote them using social media such as Facebook and Twitter. ... Meanwhile, both the MPAA and the RIAA continue to fight emerging technologies like peer-to-peer file sharing with costly court battles rather than figuring out how to appeal to the next generation of movie enthusiasts and still make a buck."

Comment: Re:I will never pay for DLC (Score -1, Troll) 466

by Totenglocke (#31488002) Attached to: <em>BioShock 2's</em> First DLC Already On Disc

Wow, troll much? Copying a file (especially one that I've already decided on moral grounds that I will not pay for) is NOT stealing because the company doesn't lose anything from it. In order for there to be theft, someone must lose something while another gains. They lose nothing by copying a file.

I don't get people like you - why don't you care about your rights? Why don't you care about having control over the property you pay for? Why are you so eager to be beaten down and forced to do things against your will? It's completely illogical.

Comment: Informants, Agents, Identities. (Score 1) 555

by elucido (#31487976) Attached to: US Intelligence Planned To Destroy WikiLeaks

The names of spies must be kept secret for many of the same reasons.

In criminal investigations the identities of informants must be kept secret.

It's not an option to release that information. Because if the government did not protect that information, the government would have no informants, spies, or intelligence capability.

Comment: Re:Refuting the imaginary article in your head (Score 1) 410

by Sancho (#31487914) Attached to: How To Guarantee Malware Detection

Yeah, but from the article:

Still, many malware agents slip through the cracks undetected... until the rules of the anti-virus programs are updated, that is.

...

Instead of looking for known patterns -- whether of instructions and data, or of actions -- wouldn't it be great if we could look for anything that is malicious? That may sound like a pipe dream.

Maybe it's just badly worded or written, but he's making it sound like he's found the panacea of virus detection. Unfortunately, it doesn't work on viruses which a) don't have a known signature and b) don't try to keep themselves in RAM (i.e. don't mind being swapped out.) I would think that if the virus can overwrite parts of the OS in memory that it would not detect those, either (e.g. it could overwrite services which are commonly started but uncommonly used and live in their process space--autoupdaters would be good candidates for this.)

What this country needs is a good five dollar plasma weapon.

Working...